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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Interesting read...

Looks like the plan is to get to 20 percent electric by 2035 and 90 percent by 2050. Or, I should say, alternative fuel sources without emissions. That leaves room for anything like hydrogen or new systems that may occur between now and then.

2035 FJR-E(lectric) anyone??? If we have bikes then, I would doubt there would be any shifting.

 

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I'd buy one if it ran on D cell batteries located in the mufflers....
 

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2006 FJR1300 AS - Orion The Hunter
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We better have jetpacks, flying cars and bikes, but 2050!!
 

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I hate the term "zero emissions". They don't take into account the entire "food chain" to build, sustain, and eventually dispose of all the stuff that is used to replace what is now spewing emissions out the tail pipe.
 

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Versys 1000 CBF1000 VFR800
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Oh we could have a good long discussion about that..... even argue that nukes are better. Think of all the resources and precious metals being used for lithium batteries that nobody knows (yet) how to properly recycle. What does it take to manufacture solar panels and windmills that isn't gobbling up energy and resources? If only a third of us had nothing but electric vehicles, there isn't enough power to charge them all up, and this will drive a huge investment in infrastructure. Gotta stop burning coal though.
So, when the demand for petro-fuels dies off someday, where are we going to get all our plastic stuff and all the petro by-products we use today?
For sure, the true big picture has to be considered rather than knee-jerk reactions to getting rid of the internal combustion engine. And I don't know who is going to put together that picture.......
Anyway, not trying to start that debate here, surely there's other forums for that.
 

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Oh we could have a good long discussion about that..... even argue that nukes are better. Think of all the resources and precious metals being used for lithium batteries that nobody knows (yet) how to properly recycle. What does it take to manufacture solar panels and windmills that isn't gobbling up energy and resources? If only a third of us had nothing but electric vehicles, there isn't enough power to charge them all up, and this will drive a huge investment in infrastructure. Gotta stop burning coal though.
So, when the demand for petro-fuels dies off someday, where are we going to get all our plastic stuff and all the petro by-products we use today?
For sure, the true big picture has to be considered rather than knee-jerk reactions to getting rid of the internal combustion engine. And I don't know who is going to put together that picture.......
Anyway, not trying to start that debate here, surely there's other forums for that.
Ray, I have so much respect for you that I appreciate you validating my humble opinion.
 

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"Dust to Dust" leaves battery-electric worse than just keeping the car you now have until it has to go to the junk yard. This is where the argument for someone like H fuel cells (increasing efficiency of course) could make a difference. Or a Mr. Fusion.
 

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Hi Ray, I also Agee with you. Electric cars and motorcycles are not the answer. Hydrogen is the most common element on the planet and all you have to do is separate it from water but unfortunately that requires electricity and a lot of it so more massive modifications to infrastructure. Kind of a depressing thought but when you cut through all the bs one sure way to reduce energy consumption on planet earth is to reduce the number of us humans, drastically. Somehow I think good old mom nature will take care of that little modification for us.
 

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COVID = Certificate of Vaccine Identification
 
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No one is proposing a magic bullet. The idea behind electrically powered vehicles is both, to concentrate a large chunk of our carbon emissions into a single source (such as coal fired power) and to allow more versatility/flexibility in supplying that power (such as nuclear).

It is much easier to regulate and control single LARGE sources of emissions versus regulate and control ZILLIONS of tiny sources of emissions.
 

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.......... If we have bikes then, I would doubt there would be any shifting. ...................
Our internal combustion engines seem to GAIN quite a bit of mileage with highway travel. What I find really interesting is Welcome To Zero Motorcycles Li-Ion motorcycles, LOOSE a crap ton of mileage on the highway. If it would make them more efficient, I assume they would've already added more gearing.
 

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Electric is great if you have short trips, warm weather, and have a lot of time to kill waiting for recharges. If it's too hot it catches on fire. If it's too cold you lose 10-40% range. And every year you own the bike you lose driving range.

It's like having a bike with a peanut gas tank with a hole in it and it takes 8 hours each time to refill at a gas station. And every year the hole in the tank gets bigger.
 

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Electric is great if you have short trips, warm weather, and have a lot of time to kill waiting for recharges. ................. It's like having a bike with a peanut gas tank with a hole in it and it takes 8 hours each time to refill at a gas station. And every year the hole in the tank gets bigger.
Well, from a daily perspective, that fits most people; more especially up North or East where 95% of motorcycles are little more than garage queens, meant for weekend rides under a 100% perfect weather forecast.

Now that EV cars have been around a decade, EV motorcycles are just starting to really show up. Technology has and is improving. Personally refill every two-three days with my sport bike, approaching 150 miles. Daily riding time probably averages an hour. Current EV wouldn't work for my previous all-over the tristate in a day occupation but would work for my ride to work, to store, may visit someone and back situation. Out West the miles really rack up quick so that could turn into a nightly recharge and top-off while at work.

Here's what one rider reported: "Took a really long ride on Saturday (250 miles) and another shorter ride yesterday (100 miles). ............... ride 90 minutes or so then charge for 45, repeat,.............. https://www.fiestastforum.com/threads/buying-an-ev.26879/post-451478"

If it's too hot it catches on fire.
Whether it was RC Cars, Segways, Laptops, Phones, or Teslas, nearly every if not every product with fast-charging capability had initial issues with battery fires. They've all learned from their and other examples of fire and no longer really have the issue.

Charging circuits have gotten complicated. There are a myriad of safeties built into the chargers now. Laptops for example monitor temperatures and will refuse to charge if outside of spec. The lawnmower charger has a built-in cooling fan. They'll refuse to charge if they're over-depleted. They'll reduce charge rate based on various parameters and absolutely avoid over-charging. Each battery-pack has its own logic components to help control charging and prevent overcharging. The technologies are still vulnerable to fire when compacted (garbage truck fires) and/or in cases of manufacturing defect.

If it's too cold you lose 10-40% range. And every year you own the bike you lose driving range.
I had tried Li-Ion starter battery some years back and what nobody warned, was the fact that they absolutely SUCK in cold weather. The Shorai battery was marketed as a CCA equivalent to lead-acid, and they flat-out lied. On my lead-acid battery in 32 degree and 19 degree weather, I could just start it up and go. The Li-Ion I had to stand around with the key in the ignition for five to twenty minutes trying to "warm up" the battery and bbbaaarrreeelllyyy have enough juice to keep the ECU alive during the crank. That's not a fault of Li-Ion but a problem with how Shorai engineered and marketed their batteries. 👺They could've engineered them to actually meet CCA spec but chose not to. By the time Winter rolled around and I discovered this, it was too late to return it.
 

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Ride for 90 mins and charge for 45... no thanks. if you stop for lunch sure.. but a 5/10 minute break that has to be 45 mins... no thanks
 
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