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The state of the current tech and infrastructure places EVs in the realm of daily commuter vehicle. (made up numbers) For some 95% of people that will suffice 95% of the time they hop behind the wheel. For trips and long-haul commuting people will be obviously be renting and sticking with fossil fuels.

Asking this question at this time does nothing but give certain folks a chance to hate.

Why is it that no one has brought up the obvious approach of a quick battery swap? (sure, that has its challenges as well)
 

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Why is it that no one has brought up the obvious approach of a quick battery swap? (sure, that has its challenges as well)
Intuit,

At least one proposal for the solid-state batteries does not include recharging at all. They propose to run the long-life battery low, and then swapping in a new (rebuilt) battery after some impressive mileage is travelled.
India, China, and Israel are developing quick battery-swap stations, instead of charging the batteries in the car.
 
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My car insurance already provides for such roadside service calls, exactly like AAA, but without the flak.
Yeah, so does mine if I want to pay an astromical fee for it otherwise it's good for $100 and a 40 mile tow. AMA is $39 per yr for me. It paid $720 for an 80 mile ride on a rollback for my '07 FJR.
 

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Battery swap reminds me of the electric (multi-cell lead acid) fork lifts we had at work. Charge times were similar to EV's but very heavy. So a spare was sitting on a roller stand and simply roll one in while pushing the old one out the other side. The problem is a spare battery is just too expensive and takes up storage room, and even the EV batteries aren't very light.
I imagine the solid states are going to reduce/eliminate the need to battery swap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #85 ·
The biggest issue I see with the battery swap is ownership of the batteries, they are not cheap, what happens when I swap a new battery out and get a beat up weak battery in return from the local station. That would be a deal breaker to me. I like the solid state idea but there are some large hurdles to clear before they are ready for prime time. To do this right we need to make the transition as infrastructure and tech catch up not by legislation. There's not a lot of room on a motorcycle for energy storage so batteries need to be compact and powerful to be practical for touring.
 

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The biggest issue I see with the battery swap is ownership of the batteries, they are not cheap, what happens when I swap a new battery out and get a beat up weak battery in return from the local station. That would be a deal breaker to me.
Mad Cat,

Any battery can be load tested, even our lead-acid batteries. I doubt that any battery-swap shop would let a bad battery go out of the door, and happily replace it if anybody finds a problem at any time. I can imagine, other than paying a start-up fee, you probably won't "own" any of the batteries that you use. Chances are, you will be getting newer batteries each time than if you owned "your" set. As for abusive users, taking a lead-acid or lithium battery down flat is deadly to them. Solid-state batteries don't have that problem, and they can even be rebuilt when necessary.
 
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Here's the vision:

You're on a commute and realize the power was out for a good part of the night due to the storm. You did some extra errands yesterday and realize you're going to come up a bit short for your commute.

You pull into the station, make your payment. A couple of minutes later someone rolls out with a couple of empty transmission jacks. You open your rear quarter panel, they raise the jack to the appropriate level, then slide one lloonngg battery out, then position the other jack and repeat. Behind them, someone rolls up with some replacements. They raise the jack to the appropriate level, then push one battery in its slot, then the other. Close the rear quarter panel and off you go.

These are just the quick-swap easy-access batteries. There would be more in other places in the vehicle. (they typically mount them between the wheels for both safety and balancing the vehicle's center-of-gravity) Depending on driver preference, you can opt to use those quick-access batteries to charge their primary while driving, or just keep them if they can make it through the day to their intended long-term charging destination. If they just use them to charge their primary set, they'll make plans to perform another swap as needed; maybe after another hour or two of travel. Obviously there are losses with every transfer of power; more transfers drops energy efficiency.

When you buy a used (a.k.a. "renewed") phone from Amazon, they guarantee that your used phone will have at least 80% of original capacity. The two phones I ordered for my folks, I connected to the PC, ran ADB and verified. One phone battery was 96% of original capacity and the other was 86% of original capacity. The point is, battery health is no longer an unknown and can be easily read.
 

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I would. It's easy. Just call someone and bitch. They'll install charging stations every 100 miles along your route just for you. It has to be true. I seen it on tee vee!
 

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The obvious solution is to install a wind turbine/generator on the back of those electric motorcycles. Then you could simply charge your battery as you move down the road.
 

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From prisons to nuclear power to fracking to Walmart, the "not in my backyard" fight is universal among backgrounds.
 

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Mad Cat,

I could see a tow truck picking up and transporting a dead EV to the nearest charging station.
A roadside recharge would probably take too long.
I would not have any AAA membership (it is really just an insurance company).
My car insurance already provides for such roadside service calls, exactly like AAA, but without the flak.
Some cars coming out right now can pick up 100 mile range with a ten minute charge. You need 240Volts, but that’s no big deal for a portable generator.
 

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Well more than a decade ago, I ran into a young fellow at a Tim Hortons. He had not been able to get drivers licence. and was on a rather longish ride, riding an electric scooter with pedals attached. He said he had unlimited range with it. There was Honda generator tied to the rear.
 

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Booooo!!!!! :LOL:
 

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They could get double the results (or half the environmental damage) if they used a dime mine.
Considering the scale at which these mines operate, it would certainly NOT be a "nickel and dime" endeavor. :unsure:
 

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Aside from all the political issues, would I tour with an electric bike? NO, not with the current bikes available and for three reasons.

1. Weight, too much, the FJR is heavy enough without the need for more weight. I don't want to be driving Miss Piggy.
2. Range and charging availability. I would spend too much time looking for a charging station (good luck in rural areas where the riding is the funest) and spend too much time charging.
3. Price, way too much.
 

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