FJR Owners Forum banner
  • Hey Everyone! Enter your bike HERE to be a part of this months Bike of the Month Challenge!
21 - 40 of 85 Posts

·
Registered
2005 FJR1300ABS
Joined
·
20 Posts
Well, the bike finally died. I only rode it for 10 miles the day prior and the bike did not idle properly, not only could it not idle but every time I touched the throttle it would die. I ended up towing the vehicle back to the garage and the headache begins. Yes, I try adjusting the idle but no matter what I did, nothing change and then it would not start......Crap......
I should mention that I just purchased the bike on 24 August.

View attachment 88025 View attachment 88026

First thing of course was removing the fuel in the tank and then removing the tank itself, Good grief the amount of crud within was bad.


View attachment 88028

Pulling all of the parts off to get to the throttle body was interesting in itself, if anyone can tell me why there is some type of goo on the intake tube flanges please let me know.

View attachment 88029
View attachment 88031 View attachment 88030

Needless to say pretty bummed at this machine, It did not look abused and was kept in a warm garage (to my knowledge) unfortunately rust in the tank does indicate that the vehicle was not properly stored for the winter and probably sat in the corner for lord knows how long. I did not imagine that I would be drilling into the bike so soon and it probably won't be done in time for the riding season this year. I do have 3 other M/C's to play with but as all of you can imagine my disappointment with this machine is understandable.

View attachment 88032

I will try and keep folks posted on this......:confused:
I had the similar misfortun, RUST!
took the tank off, washed it out, scrubbed the rust with brushes and used the POR 15 Fuel Tank repair kit. Etches the rust off, cleans and then apply a sealant. T hake 3 days to dry!
took fuel pump apart and flushed rust out of it.
reassembled after a week and runs great! No rust again after coating the tank.
 

·
Registered
2003 Yamaha FJR1300
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I had the similar misfortun, RUST!
took the tank off, washed it out, scrubbed the rust with brushes and used the POR 15 Fuel Tank repair kit. Etches the rust off, cleans and then apply a sealant. T hake 3 days to dry!
took fuel pump apart and flushed rust out of it.
reassembled after a week and runs great! No rust again after coating the tank.
For me the light rust in the tank is really not the issue anymore, one of the wallowed out bolt holes that holds the fuel pump on the tank is. Will probably clean it up very carefully and see what I have to work with, helical insert? weld, drill and tap? that is my main concern now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
For me the light rust in the tank is really not the issue anymore, one of the wallowed out bolt holes that holds the fuel pump on the tank is. Will probably clean it up very carefully and see what I have to work with, helical insert? weld, drill and tap? that is my main concern now.
Fuel will not leak through that damaged screw hole, it is a blind hole. As long as that missing screw does not cause a leak around the "O" ring gasket it is not a problem. If you try drilling out the hole for a heli-coil or similar repair, you run the danger of drilling through the blind end of the fitting and causing a leak. Reach through the fuel pump hole and run your finger around the edge inside the tank and you will feel the blind ends of those screw holes.
Welding on a fuel tank?? runs the risk of deforming the opening possibly enough to cause the "O" ring not to seal.

dan
 

·
Premium Member
2003 Gen 1
Joined
·
184 Posts
Well, the bike finally died. I only rode it for 10 miles the day prior and the bike did not idle properly, not only could it not idle but every time I touched the throttle it would die. I ended up towing the vehicle back to the garage and the headache begins. Yes, I try adjusting the idle but no matter what I did, nothing change and then it would not start......Crap......
I should mention that I just purchased the bike on 24 August.

View attachment 88025 View attachment 88026

First thing of course was removing the fuel in the tank and then removing the tank itself, Good grief the amount of crud within was bad.


View attachment 88028

Pulling all of the parts off to get to the throttle body was interesting in itself, if anyone can tell me why there is some type of goo on the intake tube flanges please let me know.

View attachment 88029
View attachment 88031 View attachment 88030

Needless to say pretty bummed at this machine, It did not look abused and was kept in a warm garage (to my knowledge) unfortunately rust in the tank does indicate that the vehicle was not properly stored for the winter and probably sat in the corner for lord knows how long. I did not imagine that I would be drilling into the bike so soon and it probably won't be done in time for the riding season this year. I do have 3 other M/C's to play with but as all of you can imagine my disappointment with this machine is understandable.

View attachment 88032

I will try and keep folks posted on this......:confused:
You may be cursing your bad luck, but with the low mileage, and your attention to details, you will get years of fun from that bike. Persevere!
You might want to consider removing the PAIR system. It's a nest of crap and always in the way. I did this and have not noticed any difference in performance, fuel mileage, or spark plug fouling.
At the risk of throwing a wrench in your forward progress, the first gens had a valve guide problem which resulted in a factory recall. Mine had the problem and thankfully the first/original owner had it fixed before I bought the bike. Don't know if after all these years it would be fixed for free, but keep an ear out for a loud ticking that may slowly creep in after a few miles, once you get her back on the road. Hopefully you won't have that problem.
And yeah, replace the CCT. A major PITA but after you have exhausted your vocabulary of expletives you will experience a huge sense of satisfaction at a job well done.
And yeah, to confirm what others have said, this forum is most excellent. Lot of good info, and almost all are congenial.
 

·
Registered
2003 Yamaha FJR1300
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Welding on a fuel tank?? runs the risk of deforming the opening possibly enough to cause the "O" ring not to seal.

dan
When I clean up the hole it will be using an itty bitty carbide tip (like the dentist use for your teeth) just to clean up the hole. I should have mentioned my TIG rig may be more appropriate than the MIG, lots of practice on empty pop cans :D.
Hopefully the clean up will give me enough useable threads to just run a "blind" thread cleaner in there to make it look nice.
 

·
Registered
2003 Yamaha FJR1300
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #29 · (Edited)
You may be cursing your bad luck, but with the low mileage, and your attention to details, you will get years of fun from that bike. Persevere!
You might want to consider removing the PAIR system. It's a nest of crap and always in the way. I did this and have not noticed any difference in performance, fuel mileage, or spark plug fouling.
At the risk of throwing a wrench in your forward progress, the first gens had a valve guide problem which resulted in a factory recall. Mine had the problem and thankfully the first/original owner had it fixed before I bought the bike. Don't know if after all these years it would be fixed for free, but keep an ear out for a loud ticking that may slowly creep in after a few miles, once you get her back on the road. Hopefully you won't have that problem.
And yeah, replace the CCT. A major PITA but after you have exhausted your vocabulary of expletives you will experience a huge sense of satisfaction at a job well done.
And yeah, to confirm what others have said, this forum is most excellent. Lot of good info, and almost all are congenial.
I really can't call it bad luck, was lucky enough to die only a 1/2 of a mile from the house and 1/4 of it is my driveway;).
The PAIR system will eventually get removed since I really do not believe in having unnecessary weight with no benefits, since I have everything in pieces the chain tensioner access does not seem like too bad an issue (famous last words), Will probably check on valve clearances too. All of my poking around have unearthed a few other potential problems as well but am addressing them one by one.
This will be a project that will go thru the winter and I can take my time on it. Just waiting for the termination dust to fall out of the sky now. I will document and take lots of pictures so this will hopefully benefit others in the future.
 

·
Registered
2003 Yamaha FJR1300
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #31 ·
I removed all 4 fuel injectors and will probably send them off to be cleaned and tested, started to clean the throttle body when I noticed 3 of the 4 fuel/air mix gates were frozen in the closed position (RED) the one with the green arrow functioned fine. The arm assembly (Light Blue) operated all 4 gates worked smoothly. Very carefully pulled each apart, cleaned and got them to work freely with no binding.You can also notice all of the crud on the throttle plates, cleaned 2 and took a picture for a side by side comparison.
The plugs were really dirty and will obviously be replaced once all of my parts come in.

Motor vehicle Vehicle Electrical wiring Audio equipment Gas
 

·
Registered
2003 Yamaha FJR1300
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #37 ·
I wonder if you could use a Timesert in that damaged holed. May have to modify the insert so it sits flush and red locktite it in
Yep, been looking at a lot of viable solutions but have to be careful on cleaning that area up without warping/damaging the metal around the hole. You cannot see it but there is a broken drill bit in there :mad:. I think if I try and extract it I may cause more damage so I will leave it be for now.
 

·
Premium Member
2015 FJR-1300ESF
Joined
·
711 Posts
Yep, been looking at a lot of viable solutions but have to be careful on cleaning that area up without warping/damaging the metal around the hole. You cannot see it but there is a broken drill bit in there :mad:. I think if I try and extract it I may cause more damage so I will leave it be for now.
You might be better off drilling & tapping a new hole off to the side (at least 1 hole diameter is probably best) in the tank ring, then matching one in the pump flange. IOW, moving the bolt over. or even 2 new ones, one on each side of the old one.

Easier said than done of course. I'd want to do the drilling in a drill press, since it's a blind hole and you really don't want to drill too deep. Most drill presses don't have a table big enough for the tank. Might be a chore to somehow hold the tank square for drilling. Tapping the new holes would be the easy part, comparatively.

Possibly you have enough clamping force with only 5 out of 6 bolts, but if it were my bike that would bug me. Sure would be awkward if it started leaking.

Good luck!
 
21 - 40 of 85 Posts
Top