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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
but can't decide.

I'm new here and this is my first post so if I'm asking something that's super "newbie" I apologize.

I like the color and heated grips of the AE but the tranny has me second guessing whether or not to go with it.

Any opinions or thoughts as to why one would go one way or the other would be appreciated
 

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Hi There: Gee, I don't know. I have been riding bikes for 35 years and I really like being cutting edge. :lol: ...... but not the bleeding edge :shock: . It sounds really impressive, but I think I will wait a bit until it has been tried and truly tested. I just bought my 04 and will play with it for at least another year but will definately put the new version (non AE version) on the next buy list. Then after that maybe put the AE version on the next to buy list
 

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There has been a lot of discussion on this topic already, but the fact is, no-one has ridden one, so everything is guess work at this stage. In my opinion, this system will be good. They have been using similar systems in road racing, drag racing, and cars for some time now, so it must work.

On the other hand, it's not usually a good idea to get the first model with new technology. There are always kinks to be ironed out. My advice is, go for it, then report back here so we can make up our minds. :lol:
 

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A vs AE.......

Given the engineering expertise Yamaha seems to have I don't think I'd be concerned about the reliability of the AE. However, as I simply prefer shifting I ordered the A, and of course it's less $$$, too.

Altho given that you do control the shifting on the AE it should be far more "engaging" than a full automatic. My Mazda 3S has a dual gate stick on its 4 speed automatic that allows me to manually shift up or down one gear at a time; the only drawback is that the car's electronic "brain" is programmed so if my revzz are too high she will not shift manually when I flick the shifter and that can be a bit disconcerting going into a tight curve........ Still that is far superior to the straight line shifter without positive detents that my C4 Vette has: real easy to miss a gear when trying to manually shift her under power. I wonder if the AE has electronic programming like the Mazda?

There sure hasn't been any cycle mag tests that I've seen of either version of the "new" FJR...wonder why? Meanwhile time s-l-o-w-l-y drags on towards March....oh sigh.... DFO :(
 

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While the AE offers simplification for riding I can only wonder at the weight penalty for handling and performance. The 2006 FJR already has the bike weighing in significantly heavier than the 2005 due to solutions/modifications for long running issues.

It almost seems that the initial product niche of reasonable power to weight with good road touring attributes may be branching between the 06 FJR A and the AE. Maybe we are seeing a product direction with the AE towards a more sedate, "fully catered" touring approach as per the GoldWing and ST1300

The FJR has consistently been good value on a $ vs attributes. I think it will be hard to go past the 2006 FJR A even against the BMW KS or KGT it's planned touring equivalent particularly if the changes effectively fix well documented issues.

Just my personal taste but I can wait until March / April 06 when the money and models will hopefully be available in Australia.

Cheers
Lenz
 

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lenz said:
Maybe we are seeing a product direction with the AE towards a more sedate, "fully catered" touring approach as per the GoldWing and ST1300
The FJR torque, throttle response and handling will not be affected by the '06E version. If anything it will be quicker steering, as I believe they have reduced the rake by a degree or two. To compare it with HONDA'S heavy set sport touring and touring duo is just wrong. Wrong league altogether.
 

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@Rocketdoc

If the US Yamaha site is accurate then the 2006 FJR A is almost 30lbs heavier than the 2005 FJR A. I haven't been able to find reliable information for the weight of the 2006 AE but it's certainly not going to be lighter. I can't find any evidence of an increase in engine output to give an equal power to weight ratio to cover the weight increase. Nor have I been able to find any information on amendments to the steering head angle or trail specs. The Canada Yamaha shows unchanged caster/trail from 03 to 06.

I'm not suggesting the AE IS a corpulent equal to the Goldwing or ST1300 just that perhaps there has been a change in market targeting initiated by Yamaha.

If you have reliable specs on the 2006 FJR A & AE above what is available on the US site please enlighten me.

Cheers
Lenz
 

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What I'm looking forward to learning about the e-box, is how one can engage the "clutch" to isolate the gear-box from the engine, as when gearing down, or accellerating, ie slipping/modulating the clutch is a major part of riding, especially through twisties, or in traffic, or in the wet. Will the bike pitch forward when rolling off? Will the rear lock up when aggressively shifting down?

The promotional literature focuses on ease and comfort as the benefits of this new feature, not performance. I love gearing down when setting up for a bend in the road: Pull the clutch, blip the throttle, gear down keeping the revs up, slipping the clutch and hitting that bend in the road, engine singing while on the boil and in the right gear to pull hard on the exit.

The extra weight must be a slipper clutch.
 

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st ryder said:
The extra weight must be a slipper clutch.
To make the clutch and gearchange work will require hydraulic pressure, therefore the new system will have a pump and a series of electro-magnetically controlled hydraulic switches. I'd guess that's where most of the 4kg goes.
 

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Whether they've used a hybrid hydraulic-electronic mechanism or a pure "E" system of switches and motors to achieve the mechanical advantage over the push rod - pressure plate will be interesting to discern, though they do state "E" for electronic shifting. It's the lack of a lever, and the ability to both, engage it at will and modualte the clutch's "grab" that confounds me since the lever plays a crucial role when matching engine speed with road speed in more technical riding. I figure a slipper clutch is necessary to avoid upsets in a drive train with no clutch lever and apparent rider "feel."

It will be interesting to read some reviews. Personally, though I'm interested in trying one, I wouldn't buy one until the riding reports are out. Ease and comfort are not selling points for me. Using the clutch proficiently is part of the fun.
 

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The "E" version has an electric servo that depresses the clutch, and an electro-mechanical shifter. The transmission still shifts as the current model, only not by a shift lever but rather by the new mechanism. There is still a foot shift lever, but is is not connected directly to the transmission but rather, as the lever on the handlebar, is connected to the computer/servo for shifting.

The Yamaha rep at the '06 presentation could not explain to me (I could not understand or picture) exactly how the clutch will work other than the computer is "reading" engine revs and speed. It will be interesting to read the first ride reports by magazine testers.

Re: rake/trail/handling. I seem to remember reading that the swing arm is longer and IIRC, the wheelbase is slightly longer. This will surely affect handling. Not for most of us, but specifically for those who ride more sport or aggressive.
 

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st ryder,
The photos from the NEC clearly show that the clutch is operated hydraulically, with the hose to the slave cylinder coming from somewhere behind the silver side panels.
Would be interested to see how this limits the choice for aftermarket shocks, what with all the ABS gubbins as well.
 

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Ahh, well that answers that. Guess I missed that line in the photos I saw. Thanks.
 

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If the US Yamaha site is accurate then the 2006 FJR A is almost 30lbs heavier than the 2005 FJR A. I haven't been able to find reliable information for the weight of the 2006 AE but it's certainly not going to be lighter. I can't find any evidence of an increase in engine output to give an equal power to weight ratio to cover the weight increase.
With a little bit of dieting and a touch of excercise (other than 12oz curls :D ), I could shave 30lbs off of myself instead of the bike, have the same power to weight ratio, and a lower center of gravity. As a bonus, I could even pretend the girlies were looking at me, not the bike. :wink:
 

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Personally, I think the AE is at least worth a test ride before dismissing it as hare-brained technology. What I'd really like to know, though, is how does Yamaha know how many of them to build? It's not like there was some mandate from the masses that they eliminate the clutch lever; just how many riders do they think are going to pay a premium for this mysterious new farkle? After they got burned on the GTS, Yamaha is the last manufacturer I would expect to try something this innovative. Why not let wacky old BMW test the waters on this one?
 

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This isn't the photo I was thinking of, but it shows the redirected hydraulic line.



(from the Belgian FJR site)

Hope they tidy the routing up a bit on the production models :(
 

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Yes, I can see why the earlier reference to a pump was made, definitly hydraulic from that photo. That *would* add considerable weight if there is a pump, but maybe all the "E" does is to replace the hand lever with an electronic verison and maintains the typical master reservoir/slave system moving it under the seat, ie all the action is the same re reservoir/piston etc. with an electronic push on the piston via a big servo rather than a hand lever. How the electronics will "finesse" the clutch during more technical riding is what I'm looking forward to reading about. Just a matter of time before we see a torque converter I'm sure. Not that there's anything wrong with that.
 
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