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Sorry, long post...I have been following this thread for a quite a long time, and finally decided to go lighter, at least a bit. I live in a place where roads are different than for most of people in here, but some might find my considerations interesting though. I bought my '16 FJR brand new in 16 and has been very happy with the bike, during this time I have learned to maintain it and have been practicing and increased riding skills and have no problem with the handling. But on trips my wife is always with me and we typical ends up in smaller roads between fjords and mountains where the real speed is often quite low due to topography with poor view corners, narrow roads, pavement with holes and bumps and so on. During the last two years I have been gradually realizing the FJR is too much of a speed monster used in a wrong environment and not the right tool for our typical trips, so last summer I sold my lovely bike, and spoiled by the FJR, finding a replacement wasn't going to be easy.

My requirement was...
Size: Big enough for two-up with luggage.
Weight: Less than the FJR, and lower center of gravity.
Engine: Less power than the FJR, less intense, more relaxed engine. I don't care for speed, just happy to ride a bike.
Suspension: Needs to handle poor pavement well, but also cornering and a little sport.
Ergonomic: Getting older, needs better ergonomic and better knee angle.
Height: I am not flatfooting the FJR, cannot be taller.
Saddle: Saddle has to be comfortable for both, passenger to sit a bit higher than on the FJR and be able to look over rider.
Chain/ FD: I don't really want to go back to chain after 5 years with a FD.
Finish/quality: High
Fairing: Weather protection needs to be good, not necessarily FJR level. Easier maintenance and less plastic to get damaged at a tilt-over.
Price: My budget allows me to buy what I want within reasonable limits.
Maintenance: It must be possible to do your own maintenance with reasonable skills and equipment.

Never been a fan of ADV bikes, but with all this in mind, the GS was the only bike that tick all the boxes and it had to be tested. Last September wife and me test drove one at a dealer for 1.5 hour, after 15 minutes decision was made and order placed within following month.

After a cold 420 km 7 hour trip home from the dealer mid mars, with only two short stops, my first impressions are...
Ergonomic is close to perfect, steering, knee angle, both saddles very good ( comfort version, heated), after 7 hours no pain at all. Clutch very light.
Weather protection: Surprisingly good, less buffering and wind noise, but a bit more wind on the passenger on the highway compared to FJR, won't be a problem for our usage.
Height: Maybe a bit taller than the FJR, but not so wide, so foot on the ground - approx. equal to the the FJR.
Weight is approx. 45 kg less than FJR, center of gravity lower and low speed handling feels very much easier. Manually handling in garage is much lighter compared to FJR.
The boxer engine is very characteristic, I really love this 100 year old concept, it just feels right with the longitudinal engine and the two heads out on each side combined with the FD. Less engine noise, nice.
Suspension (electronic version) will be a huge difference on the typical roads with poor pavement. My wife does not longer complains when hitting a pot hole or a bump.
The TFT, menus and the "wonderwheel" is very good, it really works well when getting used to it.

Further I think...
A misstep with your foot on a parking lot on a fully loaded FJR can easily end with a tilt, same with the GS, but with the GS it will not be the end of your trip due to low center of gravity and proper crash bars, damages if any will be a few scratches.
I have read up a lot, will buy the tools I need and will do my own maintenance, seems no more difficult than on the FJR. Panels are done in 10 minutes, the valves are just waiting for you.
Regarding reliability, I know BMW scores less than Yamaha, but I find it a bit difficult to compare the GS and the FJR directly, especially when you see how owners around the world use their GS's off road. Anyhow, I can accept increased maintenance cost compared to the FJR.

The alternatives, considered a few and was at the dealer and had a look at the Yamaha T9. I did not like the split screen, I am not fan of 3 cyl engines (just me), chain was not what I wanted, but could have lived with it if everything else was in place, details and finish ok, but no more, seems a bit to be designed by economists, passenger saddle seems missing height in front, don't like the small headlights, side cases have odd shape, overall size for two-up could work but no more. If you take a look at the Yamaha line-up compared to what BMW have, it seems like Yamaha is giving up big and expensive bikes. Here in Europe, the FJR and the Super Tenere are both gone, seems like they have forgotten the group of 50+ years. If the S Ten have been upgraded, it would definitely been an alternative to the GS.

BTW, I am not trying to convince anyone to follow my choice, I leave it to BMW to sell their bikes.

Here it is, my FJR replacement which I hope will be the right thing for my preferred roads, I felt for the simple white. Except some minor equipment, I will keep it stock, and will always have street tires on.
Some things never change, FD shaft splines needs to be lubed on this one as well :)
View attachment 84567



/rogerf
Congratulations. I had a deal made on a GS and was 12 hours away from taking delivery when I changed my mind and bought the FJR instead. I was trading a 1600. But I had an FJR before, and I was two days away from retiring, so the extra cost is what stopped me. I’m not an adventure bike guy (understatement), but I liked it for the same reasons you did.

Two questions. 1). Did you find one without spoke wheels, or did you order it? I could not find one within 2,000 miles without them. 2). What is your gas mileage when freeway cruising? I only ask because of the smaller gas tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,022 ·
Used inventory is better this year than the last 2. That said demand and prices are still high. I don't see that changing anytime soon judging by auction numbers both volume and pricing. It is also dependent on bike. For example and everyone here should love this FJRs are very hard to get and priced high right now. '13-16 FJRs are selling for more money than same year RTs that's if you can find them while there's a lot of used RTs out there.

On another note...it's here
Tire Wheel Fuel tank Automotive fuel system Automotive lighting
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,023 ·
Congratulations. I had a deal made on a GS and was 12 hours away from taking delivery when I changed my mind and bought the FJR instead. I was trading a 1600. But I had an FJR before, and I was two days away from retiring, so the extra cost is what stopped me. I’m not an adventure bike guy (understatement), but I liked it for the same reasons you did.

Two questions. 1). Did you find one without spoke wheels, or did you order it? I could not find one within 2,000 miles without them. 2). What is your gas mileage when freeway cruising? I only ask because of the smaller gas tank.
I have a couple of friends with GSs and while I cannot tell you exactly what mileage they are getting I can tell you that before they get to 200 miles on a tank they are in severe panic mode. As far as cast vs wire wheels on my KTM I simply ordered a set of cast wheels and switched them over. I think in the US only the base model GS comes with cast wheels and they are hard to find.
 
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I found going to a lighter bike (Honda 1000) a way bigger step down in every way and in particular I just couldn't adjust to the ergos. Sold it after one season. But still I'm approaching the age where the weight and top heaviness of the FJR is going to become problematic (sooner than later) and so I'm looking again for something lighter and in particular less top heavy. I'll be following this thread religiously...never thought I would go back to BMW again, but even that's a possibility...
 

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2009 FJR 1300AE
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I found going to a lighter bike (Honda 1000) a way bigger step down in every way and in particular I just couldn't adjust to the ergos. Sold it after one season. But still I'm approaching the age where the weight and top heaviness of the FJR is going to become problematic (sooner than later) and so I'm looking again for something lighter and in particular less top heavy. I'll be following this thread religiously...never thought I would go back to BMW again, but even that's a possibility...
So they say once the FJR is moving you don't feel the weight and it feels very nimble. So that's the solution. Keep it moving, don't stop if you can avoid it. All kidding aside the other day I stopped on an off camber spot and had a hard time getting her off the side stand so I know what you're talking about but I'm a stubborn SOB and don't want to consider the alternative. :confused:
 

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So they say once the FJR is moving you don't feel the weight and it feels very nimble. So that's the solution. Keep it moving, don't stop if you can avoid it. All kidding aside the other day I stopped on an off camber spot and had a hard time getting her off the side stand so I know what you're talking about but I'm a stubborn SOB and don't want to consider the alternative. :confused:
Let’s be honest, you won’t be happy with anything else.(y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,027 ·
Actually you may be surprised. There's lots of good bikes out there. I like the FJR and enjoyed owning one. I'm loving the 890 Adventure because I like the things it does better than the FJR and the 1 or 2 things it doesn't do as well don't bother me. If you keep an open mind you may find new ways to have fun on motorcycles.
 

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Congratulations. I had a deal made on a GS and was 12 hours away from taking delivery when I changed my mind and bought the FJR instead. I was trading a 1600. But I had an FJR before, and I was two days away from retiring, so the extra cost is what stopped me. I’m not an adventure bike guy (understatement), but I liked it for the same reasons you did.

Two questions. 1). Did you find one without spoke wheels, or did you order it? I could not find one within 2,000 miles without them. 2). What is your gas mileage when freeway cruising? I only ask because of the smaller gas tank.
Answer to your questions...

1). I ordered a brand new bike, and at least here the GS comes with alloy wheel as standard if not the enduro package is ticked off. I never go off road and don't need spoke wheels, I also prefer alloy wheels, no adjustments, easy cleaning.
2). Still only 1500 km on the clock, but so far it seems like 0.5 l/10 km equal to 47 MPG (US), and that with two-up. Seems to end there for all type of driving, so I would say identical to my FJR.

/rogerf
 

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I bought a new fjr, and rode it a week with nothing- no top case, no side cases, no aerostich pump under the seat. Pretty much stock except for an Aeroflow shield.
Wow. A totally different bike from my 2018 fully loaded. Like a complete different model. I was amazed.

This is my third new fjr. I don’t know why this experience was so revelatory. But it has been a different ride, for sure.
Here we go again but now it’s my turn. I love the FJR but I’m thinking of going to something lighter. Would like to stay sport touring as I already have the Multis. Bike must have cruise, windshield and bags. I wish someone else made an R1200R or RS than BMW. Sort of what I’m thinking but do not want to own a beemer. Ducati Supersport is ok but the bags are tiny and no cruise. Any thought or suggestions?
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,030 ·
I bought a new fjr, and rode it a week with nothing- no top case, no side cases, no aerostich pump under the seat. Pretty much stock except for an Aeroflow shield.
Wow. A totally different bike from my 2018 fully loaded. Like a complete different model. I was amazed.

This is my third new fjr. I don’t know why this experience was so revelatory. But it has been a different ride, for sure.
Bill, not trying to throw salt in the wound but is that because it didn't come with side cases? I would think a stripped down bike WOULD feel totally different and better than a loaded up bike. Just having empty bags on the bike make a big difference. Were you able to keep the bags from your '18 until Yamaha gets bags for you?
 

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I still have the 2018. The 2022 has Yamaha city cases. I quite like them. It’s no mystery- the stock bar position and unladen bike are why the 22 felt different.
Bill, not trying to throw salt in the wound but is that because it didn't come with side cases? I would think a stripped down bike WOULD feel totally different and better than a loaded up bike. Just having empty bags on the bike make a big difference. Were you able to keep the bags from your '18 until Yamaha gets bags for you?
 

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Yes..... came out with 2018 Tracer 900 GT I believe. Lids are flatter than FJR bags, have 22L capacity. Bases are common to FJR, only the lids are different.
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,036 ·
Been riding the Norden 901 a bit the last couple of days and I'm quite pleased. Same great 890 Adventure I've come to know and love with a better seat, fairing, and suspension. It makes me think that KTM is in a position to do the same as Honda with making many bikes from 1 platform a la Africa Twin /NT1100. Slap a set of 17" wheels and some bags on the Norden and you've got a sport touring bike!
 

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You're not going to believe this but...

My brother calls me about a month ago, looking to update his ride from an 1100 V-star to something more "capable." I provide him w/a load of info regarding current models, engine types, blah, blah, blah and he responds he's not in a rush but he'll look at the info.

A day later he's changed his mind. Wants to buy NOW, got the bug and that was that. What does he decide on? An FJR. So after much shopping by me (my specialty,) we find a '16ES model in Melbourne, FL, about 3 hrs from him, an hour and a half from me. 15k on the odo, ok price, he and the owner agree to a deal and blammo, yday we meet up to pick it up.

This is the biggest, most powerful, advanced bike he's ever owned and he flat out fell in love w/it on the ride home, noting he cruised at 103 MPH at one point and wasn't aware he was going that fast. Thought he was doing 75!

I gotta admit, having seen the '16 again, I became a little envious and as I've said, I'm searching again for a ride to replace my Z900RS ST/UJM. I'd pretty much settled on the '15-18 Versys 1000 but now... I may just buy another FJR, dagnabit.

Thank God it's only money, right? A real first world problem...
Lee
 

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Having passed the "70" mark now, and still not being especially long of leg, this question is a daily one for me still.
We've been having a cold spring so far until this week (north central US) so the FJR's superior weather protection is of value. (I've added some light handguards and wind wings for cold weather use to go with the large Rifle windshield.)(Plus, Soupy's links and a Seat Concepts saddle gets it down a little so that I'm almost flat-footed.)
So the V-Strom 650 went into the box and my '09 FJR came out. Frankly, I needed to convince myself that I am still able to handle it well in the low-speed situations. I am, it turns out.
And there's no getting away from that fabulous FJR motor. That thing never gets old. Staying out of the throttle is the bigger problem.
Great brakes, excellent handling, the electric windshield, good sidecases, it's still an excellent machine.
I am fortunate to have these other two bikes here, the V-Strom and the fifth-gen (hello, Ray!) VFR800 to switch off to. I do ride the VFR the most these days. I have Heli Multi-Tour Sport bars on a conversion to save my old neck plus some extra-windshield setups so that it's closer to touring and I know I can do a 600-mile day on it since I did just that last autumn to prove a point to myself.
That all said, the Versys 1000 is high on my radar, being a Kawasaki guy by long association. As mentioned previously, I had a sweet lucky opportunity to put a free 1000 miles on a pair last summer and know that it will do what I am looking for, provided a couple of mods get done.
One popped up on Facebook a week ago over in Lansing, Michigan, a '16 with only 5000 miles on it what appeared to be really good shape. The fellow started at $6000 and it didn't sell in the first week! I was beside myself because my motorcycle-buying pot was emptied over the winter and I would have had to have sold the FJR instantly to make the move.
Then the guy lowered the price to $5200! Good heavens! It was gone before I could even make an appeal to the Better Half to break into the non-motorcycle precincts, needless to say.
So the good 'ol FJR remains as my Big Road Bike For Traveling and I guess, at 75K miles, I'm going to have to subject myself to the ordeal of a valve adjustment.
And since my beat-up left hand is getting worse (40 years a carpenter, used up a lot of cartilage), I may have to go back and research the late-model clutch mod said to reduce the lever pressure.
 

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Having passed the "70" mark now, and still not being especially long of leg, this question is a daily one for me still.
We've been having a cold spring so far until this week (north central US) so the FJR's superior weather protection is of value. (I've added some light handguards and wind wings for cold weather use to go with the large Rifle windshield.)(Plus, Soupy's links and a Seat Concepts saddle gets it down a little so that I'm almost flat-footed.)
So the V-Strom 650 went into the box and my '09 FJR came out. Frankly, I needed to convince myself that I am still able to handle it well in the low-speed situations. I am, it turns out.
And there's no getting away from that fabulous FJR motor. That thing never gets old. Staying out of the throttle is the bigger problem.
Great brakes, excellent handling, the electric windshield, good sidecases, it's still an excellent machine.
I am fortunate to have these other two bikes here, the V-Strom and the fifth-gen (hello, Ray!) VFR800 to switch off to. I do ride the VFR the most these days. I have Heli Multi-Tour Sport bars on a conversion to save my old neck plus some extra-windshield setups so that it's closer to touring and I know I can do a 600-mile day on it since I did just that last autumn to prove a point to myself.
That all said, the Versys 1000 is high on my radar, being a Kawasaki guy by long association. As mentioned previously, I had a sweet lucky opportunity to put a free 1000 miles on a pair last summer and know that it will do what I am looking for, provided a couple of mods get done.
One popped up on Facebook a week ago over in Lansing, Michigan, a '16 with only 5000 miles on it what appeared to be really good shape. The fellow started at $6000 and it didn't sell in the first week! I was beside myself because my motorcycle-buying pot was emptied over the winter and I would have had to have sold the FJR instantly to make the move.
Then the guy lowered the price to $5200! Good heavens! It was gone before I could even make an appeal to the Better Half to break into the non-motorcycle precincts, needless to say.
So the good 'ol FJR remains as my Big Road Bike For Traveling and I guess, at 75K miles, I'm going to have to subject myself to the ordeal of a valve adjustment.
And since my beat-up left hand is getting worse (40 years a carpenter, used up a lot of cartilage), I may have to go back and research the late-model clutch mod said to reduce the lever pressure.
Well Cherry it's good to run into a fellow Woodpecker. At 69 I'm right behind you. An accident with a Power Miter back in 1987 left me with little to no use of my left hand which put me unable to work a clutch/ride until I discovered my AE in 2009. Another thing I had considered was an EMF auto clutch (which they say they can fit to any bike) though never acted on it. Curious if anyone had any experience with these or might be something you'd want to look into. :unsure:
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,040 ·
Well I made it halfway through first tank of gas with my new Norden before I found myself on the side of the road! Gas gauge said I had half a tank and range said 170 miles but sure seemed like the bike ran out of gas. GPS said nearest gas station was .8 miles away and it's a light bike so I started pushing. Bike took less than 3 gallons of gas in a 5 gallon tank and fired right up. Did some research and found out out that with the saddle style tank there is a cross over tube with a petcock on both sides. Whoever prepped the bike at the dealer must have forgotten to open the right side so I did indeed run out of gas with half a tank left! There's always seems to be some silly little things that need to get sorted when you buy a bike, new or used. Glad to get this one out of the way. Had a nice ride after and got my exercise for the day. All joking aside I realized pretty quickly how light the bike is, it was pretty easy pushing the bike to the gas station even on the uphill parts.
 
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