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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
What's the "common practice" when crossing Texas gates; "A" or "B" ?

personally I don't like them, cause some are sunken in an inch below the road surface, upsetting the bike a lot if crossed at full speed, and that's why;
  1. I slow down usually
  2. I aim for "A" (the metal strips) to minimize the vibrations
...my Vstrom front knobby tire doesn't care if I don't line up the "A" strips perfectly, but I can definitely feel it on my FJR so I go "B" with FJR

p.s. yes it's a very short distance when crossing the gates, but still, I have seen cars crossing Texas gates at full speed and at "B" choice and they get shaken so violently that the hubcaps sometimes fall off.

79399


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I crossed a few of those on 240 in the badlands last week. I cross at B. Was doing maybe 30, no issues.
We would call those cattle guards around here.
 
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Whichever path you choose, make sure the bike is perfectly vertical and not leaned over. If leaned, traction will disappear in a heartbeat.
 

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We have lots of those in Montana. I cross on B.
 
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Ditto lots of CATTLE GUARDS here. ;)

And B.

Definitely B.

A looks like a good place to get caught in that steel rut, and have your bike pitched violently in one direction when you try to steer out of it (like a deep rut in a dirt road - for those who have experienced dumping a dirt bike in dried ruts)
 

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Damir,

Plan B, certainly. Plan A can be a disaster, if a tire goes off one edge (you will not get it back). That could dump the bike. Plan be is rough, but Plan A (possibly sliding on pavement) can be rougher.

Funny story on cattle guards (I watched this happen on the national news):
Then-President Clinton once told a gathering of press and Congress people that he was eliminating the government handouts for Colorado cattle guards. A Colorado Congresswoman (who was a real card, in her own right) immediately spoke up, saying that if the cattle guards were not to be paid for with Federal money, then the President should authorize re-training of those cattle guards, for some other occupation. On camera, Clinton agreed to that option. :LOL:
 

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A, definitely. Slow down, be perfectly perpendicular, relax the grip, no brakes. Perhaps stand up on the pegs a bit. Just like riding on a washboard section of dirt road. You do do that, eh ;) ? If you haven't tried it on the FJR, give it a shot. It does surprising well on moderately maintained national forest roads.
 

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Ok, the midwest rube is going to speak now ! I have never seen those ! I’ve been all over east of the Mississippi and quite a bit in the west when I used to travel for work but never seen one of those, what’s the purpose ? Not something I’d particularly seek out to ride on, reminds me of the grated surface on the Mackinaw bridge which is anything but a pleasant experience.
 
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Ok, the midwest rube is going to speak now ! I have never seen those ! I’ve been all over east of the Mississippi and quite a bit in the west when I used to travel for work but never seen one of those, what’s the purpose ? Not something I’d particularly seek out to ride on, reminds me of the grated surface on the Mackinaw bridge which is anything but a pleasant experience.
It is to keep cattle/buffalo from crossing without having to use a gate. You will typically see a fence on both sides of the road perpendicular to the road. So it is an extension of a fence line. Even in the midwest you see them, more often at the end of a driveway of a farm that has cattle.
 
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As Vince mentioned, cattle guards are ubiquitous in Montana. Every entrance and exit to an interstate has one, for example. We live in ranch land with a cattle and buffalo ranch adjacent to us. I do not recall seeing the "A" strips on a cattle guard around here. On major highways they sometimes just paint stripes on the road to simulate the metal tubes of the cattle guard; seems to work. We just make sure to cross them at a 90 degree angle and will slow down a bit if one is on a high speed road. Most rural roads around here are posted for 70 MPH.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
A, definitely. Slow down, be perfectly perpendicular, relax the grip, no brakes. Perhaps stand up on the pegs a bit. Just like riding on a washboard section of dirt road..
You mentioned washboards, so that would be "B" then ?
 

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I should mention that none of the cattle guards I crossed last week actually had an "A" section, there were a few perpendicular bars between tube sections but nothing that wide. Not even sure I have seen one like that. I stayed off the perpendicular bars not wanting to be hitting the corners of anything.
 

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It is to keep cattle/buffalo from crossing without having to use a gate. You will typically see a fence on both sides of the road perpendicular to the road. So it is an extension of a fence line. Even in the midwest you see them, more often at the end of a driveway of a farm that has cattle.
AND to add, if you're crossing them that usually means that you're traveling through open range, meaning cattle could be on the road at any given time.
 

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AND to add, if you're crossing them that usually means that you're traveling through open range, meaning cattle could be on the road at any given time.
Or buffalo ;)
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B since A would leave more time in contact with tractionless steel.

I don't slow down and, when doing the desert outback of the western, USA, have started a day crossing them when they sounded like BRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR. By the end of the 1611-mile day, they sounded like BR (very quick, higher-pitched "zip").
 

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Ok, the midwest rube is going to speak now ! I have never seen those ! I’ve been all over east of the Mississippi and quite a bit in the west when I used to travel for work but never seen one of those, what’s the purpose ? Not something I’d particularly seek out to ride on, reminds me of the grated surface on the Mackinaw bridge which is anything but a pleasant experience.
I'm with you: Never seen one. Looks scary.

Haynes
 

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We even have cattle guards in Missouri and Arkansas. I've seen them in TN, GA, KY, NC, CA too. I don't recall seeing an 'A' either - but I would choose 'B' anyway. Like railroad crossings, they're easier if perfectly perpendicular (and on one wheel ;) ).
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
I'm with you: Never seen one. Looks scary.
Haynes
Haynes, You think that was scary?

...check what else we have in some places, "especially designed for City Buses" they are wide so they fit nicely...but good luck if you are a car or a bike...how stupid and dangerous is that :rolleyes::oops:

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and some other places in the World have EVEN BETTER solutions :D:ROFLMAO::rolleyes:

 

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They are no big deal really. Depends on how well they match up with the road surface. Some are smooth as glass and others with launch your butt off the seat and into the air. Like Forrest Gump says, they are like a box of chocolates, you never know what you gonna get.
I just stand on the pegs like a dirt bike and let the bike do whatever its going to do under neath me. It happens real quick and you are back on the seat. You do need to be upright and not leaned over. New Mexico is notorious for having them in a curve so just be aware. They are sort of like tar snakes. You are over them and gone before you know it.
 
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