FJR Owners Forum banner
  • Hey Everyone! Enter your bike HERE to be a part of this months Bike of the Month Challenge!

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,492 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Stop & Go Tire plugger

I've been carrying this kit around for a few years now and finally got a chance to use it today. A friend brought his Ninja 1000 over for me to help with some work on it, and I noticed a drywall screw sticking out of it. That's unfortunate for him, but I'd been waiting for an opportunity to try the Stop & Go Tire plugger out.

Time will tell, but it was sealed and not leaking when he left a few hours later. I must say I'm glad I got to try it out at home first. I wouldn't have wanted to figure it out by the side of the freeway on a hot, summer, Arkansas day.

My biggest problem was that the instructions ay to screw it in until it stops. I did that and it didn't push the plug in. So I took it off and counted the turns to turn it all the way, and it was 20 turns. I tried again with the plug, and it stopped at 15. I pretty much had to force it the last five turns. But it worked as advertised.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
That kit is a POS in my not so humble opinion. I had one years ago. Only marginal success. I eventually went to the sticky string/gummy worm method and have had great success with that. And that is repairing approximately 25 or so flats over the years. Most folks who chime in and repaired more than a few flat tires are going to agree with me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
308 Posts
I don't know if the Stop & Go kit is a POS but I do know that sticky string works. It's what I carry and unfortunately have used.

Haynes
 

·
Premium Member
2007 FJR A Model
Joined
·
8,063 Posts
I've never tried a Stop & Go kit. Tell me, is it possible to insert more than one plug? I've had to do that twice with sticky strings (which worked fine) just to get me home. I inserted the first then held it with pliers as I inserted the second. In one case I held those 2 while inserting the third.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,492 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
That kit is a POS in my not so humble opinion. I had one years ago. Only marginal success. I eventually went to the sticky string/gummy worm method and have had great success with that. And that is repairing approximately 25 or so flats over the years. Most folks who chime in and repaired more than a few flat tires are going to agree with me.
I tried it twice, and it didn't work. Then I figured out what I was doing wrong, and it worked. I've tried to fix one tire with it, and I managed to fix one tire. Yay, I'm batting 1000. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,492 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I've never tried a Stop & Go kit. Tell me, is it possible to insert more than one plug? I've had to do that twice with sticky strings (which worked fine) just to get me home. I inserted the first then held it with pliers as I inserted the second. In one case I held those 2 while inserting the third.
I haven't tried, but I'm gonna say it's probably unlikely. I think if you tried to push the tool through again, you'd likely damage the first one. But I don't know. I've never done it, but I've seen holes filled with several pieces of sticky string.

I do still carry the sticky string, but I added the Stop & Go because I've got arthritis in my hands, and I hoped the Stop & Go needle would be easier to push through the hole. It was. For me, it's a serious struggle to try to push the tool through with a piece of string in it. I use a little glue on it to lubricate it some, and it's still a pretty good wad of material to try to push through. The Stop & Go isn't easy, but I managed without pain. :)

After my experience yesterday, if I were to have a small puncture on the road, I'd probably try the Stop & Go, just because it's so much easier to push the tool through. A bigger hole, I'd try to patch with the sticky string until I could replace the tire.
 

·
Premium Member
2007 FJR A Model
Joined
·
8,063 Posts
I haven't tried, but I'm gonna say it's probably unlikely. I think if you tried to push the tool through again, you'd likely damage the first one. But I don't know. I've never done it, but I've seen holes filled with several pieces of sticky string.

I do still carry the sticky string, but I added the Stop & Go because I've got arthritis in my hands, and I hoped the Stop & Go needle would be easier to push through the hole. It was. For me, it's a serious struggle to try to push the tool through with a piece of string in it. I use a little glue on it to lubricate it some, and it's still a pretty good wad of material to try to push through. The Stop & Go isn't easy, but I managed without pain. :)

After my experience yesterday, if I were to have a small puncture on the road, I'd probably try the Stop & Go, just because it's so much easier to push the tool through. A bigger hole, I'd try to patch with the sticky string until I could replace the tire.
I had the same problem with sticky string tools until I found out there are T handled ones. The straight handles are very difficult for me to grip. I found them at Auto Zone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
I had the same problem with sticky string tools until I found out there are T handled ones. The straight handles are very difficult for me to grip. I found them at Auto Zone.
And the 'pistol grip' handles are even better than the T-handles!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,492 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks guys. I'll see what I can find. There's an Autozone near me.
 

·
Premium Member
CBF1000 VFR800
Joined
·
8,084 Posts
I've tried a couple of the "higher tech" plug systems, back to sticky strings they work. Have not tried the Stop & Go, so can't comment on those.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Stop & Go Tire plugger

I've been carrying this kit around for a few years now and finally got a chance to use it today. A friend brought his Ninja 1000 over for me to help with some work on it, and I noticed a drywall screw sticking out of it. That's unfortunate for him, but I'd been waiting for an opportunity to try the Stop & Go Tire plugger out.

Time will tell, but it was sealed and not leaking when he left a few hours later. I must say I'm glad I got to try it out at home first. I wouldn't have wanted to figure it out by the side of the freeway on a hot, summer, Arkansas day.

My biggest problem was that the instructions ay to screw it in until it stops. I did that and it didn't push the plug in. So I took it off and counted the turns to turn it all the way, and it was 20 turns. I tried again with the plug, and it stopped at 15. I pretty much had to force it the last five turns. But it worked as advertised.

Im out on a ride miles away ..................the kit properly installed will get U home

no hammering

no blitzing

priority is to get home safely ..............get a new tyre install 1st opportunity
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
I tried them all at one time or another. Sometime they do work and some other time they don't. Some are better than others.
For the past few years I've been using Nealey Mini Tire Repair Kit.
Ten 7 inch repairs and inserting tool.
Repairs 2 and 4 ply tires on autos, small pickups, motorcycles, ATV's, golf cars, garden tractors, riding mowers, etc.
Top Notch quality. Better than everything else I've ever used with the exception of a regular patch.
Give it a try.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
27 Posts
Hey Calboy,
Thanks for the Nealey Tire Repair Kit suggestion. I just
ordered a kit directly from them, as I prefer to support small Made in the USA companies and products!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Hey Calboy,
Thanks for the Nealey Tire Repair Kit suggestion. I just
ordered a kit directly from them, as I prefer to support small Made in the USA companies and products!!
I buy American made products over any of the crap made anywhere else with the exception of Germany, England, Sweden and Japan. I've been doing it for decades.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
168 Posts
My brother had a flat on his K1600 GTL last fall while we were on a ride in Quebec. He somehow picked up a cotter-pin in the tire. Fortunately we were only 20 minutes from the hotel and he had trailered his bike there from Ontario. We used the stop-n-go plug and I would give it a thumbs-down. It was a pain to use and we couldn't get a tire to seal - we may have been better off leaving the cotter pin in the tire. It should be called the stop-n-go-but-not-too-far. Our buddy Ryan at Fortnine does a nice analysis of various tire plug kits.


Zwartie
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
168 Posts
I buy American made products over any of the crap made anywhere else with the exception of Germany, England, Sweden and Japan. I've been doing it for decades.
Yeah, you better stay away from that Canadian crap, eh!

Zwartie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,492 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Yeah, you better stay away from that Canadian crap, eh!

Zwartie
He said "American made." Unless they moved it while I wasn't looking, Canada is still in North America. :) Seriously, I consider Canadian made and US made to be "American made."
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
168 Posts
He said "American made." Unless they moved it while I wasn't looking, Canada is still in North America. :) Seriously, I consider Canadian made and US made to be "American made."
Does that include Mexico as well? What about Central and South American countries? Asking for an amigo.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top