FJR Owners Forum banner
  • Hey Everyone! Enter your bike HERE to be a part of this months Bike of the Month Challenge!
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For the past couple of years, I have tolerated the Las Vegas heat and/or avoided it by not taking extended mid-summer rides. Well, I'm getting tired of the easy bake oven effect that can occur when living in God's blast furnace. Have any of you 'stitch owners had much luck with the evaporative cooling vests?

I have found Silver Eagle Outfitters, the TechNiche cooling vest, and Colorado Coolwear products. Most of them recommend only using these vests inside of jackets that ventilate "well".

Here is my issue. What does "well" mean? Will they work inside of my roadcrafter suit or am I just setting myself up for an easy bake sauna treatment? I don't mind feeling a bit wet inside of the suit as long as it works to reduce my core temperature. I'm sure there are quite a few of you out there with mesh jackets that are thinking.... get one. I'm not sure if I'm willing to give up on the sense of security that my aerostitch provides for me.

Any constructive input would be greatly appreciated.

Worldbound4now
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,358 Posts
I've been caught out in the 'stich in some extreme heat and humidity... and it's not pleasant. I wetted my shirt, and that helped... but I still choose mesh when it's really hot.

There is some good, protective mesh out there.

I understand your feeling about the protection of the 'stich, though.

Good luck.


:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,358 Posts
Sorry PocketPC temporarily posessed by devil. Calling Priest. :|


:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Love my coolvest

Dude, I got a coolvest from http://www.coloradocoolwear.com like 3 years ago and am loving it! The pavement gets HOT here in NC around June and stays that way until well into October.

I put that vest in some cold water for about 15 mins, pull it out and put it on. I have ridden with it for more than 5 hours in the heat and it's great. Best part, $40.00!! The others I found were like $90 and up! I figured that for $40.00, if it only worked for a little while, I'd be happy. This things STILL GOIN!

You can keep your $160 vest, mine's just fine! :mrgreen: I wear it under a leather jacket (pavement hurts!) and I'm cool as a cucumber!

Later, all![/url]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
372 Posts
Before spending any money on a cooling vest, I would suggest wetting down a Tshirt , and ride with your 'stich vents open. If you get cooling with the wet Tshirt, you will get cooling with the Vest. It requires evaporation to create the cooling, the more ventilation, the better evaporation, the cooler the ride.
Not owning a 'stich yet, I have no idea how well the vents really work, but the ventilation/evap cooling you get with a mesh over a vest is truly wonderful.
I wear a wet bandana under my helmet and open the vents on the RF1000 and it does a nice job too.
Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
I don't know about the Roadcrafter, but I ride with a Darien all year long. I also have a mesh jacket.
Both of them suck monsterously when stationary at a light being beaten by the sun.

The mesh jacket is soooooo sweet when coming off the line and all of the built up sweat evaporates, but then it's just hot air blowing across me. An evaporative set-up of some kind would probably be very nice.

The Darien doesn't have quite as much air-flow, but IMHO keeps me cool longer (perhaps it's just a perception, but there it is. Someone with more specific knowledge in biological heat transfer may disagree). Thus I wear it all the time, and my mesh jacket hangs in the closet.

I've also heard of folks stuffing their jacket pockets with ice cubes to get some direct and evaporative cooling... Try the wet T-shirt, and see what you think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Although I don't have a stich, I do ride in the desert (Mojave) with full leathers for a one hour commute (one way)... every day. So, I guess I can at least offer my perspective.

I use a Silver Eagle Outfitters evaporative cooling vest and it works pretty well. I don't plan on moving over to the mesh jacket until maybe it gets closer to 110 degrees since I manage to stay pretty cool, even with the leather jacket. My jacket is a Tourmaster Cortech Coaster and has the following vents: two in biceps area (3-4 inches), two along back (vertical - 6-7 inches), and two in the upper chest (horizontal - about 2 inches - not very effective). Still, though, I get pretty good cooling effects with a jacket that I'm fairly certain is not all that well vented (most definitely when compared to my leather/mesh jacket).

A few days ago, I showed a bike mechanic my vest (in Barstow) and he nearly flipped out when he felt how cool it was inside my jacket (it was about 98-99 degrees out). When it's about 105 degrees, I can ride comfortably for about 2-3 hours before I normally re-dip the vest in water. I could probably work it longer, but just feel better when I know it's at maximum "charge." With the residual cooling effect, I can sit down for 10-15 minutes in 95 degree heat (still wearing my leathers - zipped up) and eat a sandwich or drink a soda and still not have sweat bead up on my forehead. You can imagine the looks I get, especially considering that the vest peeks out underneath my jacket. In traffic, I will start to sweat inside the helmet (although lightly) but my core stays cool and that manages to keep me happy; we all know that there is nothing truly manageable about being stuck in traffic on a bike.

In the past, I had also done the "wet t-shirt" thing and it is as gr8eyes says... best left for a wet t-shirt contest. When it really gets warm out, the t-shirt thing is really only a gimmick that leaves your skin wet (and eventually drier because of contact with the water) AND only lasts about 15 minutes.

When I wet the vest, I actually dip the entire vest and soak it. Then I gently wring out the excess and gently wipe down the inside of the vest with a paper towel in order to remove any standing water. After that, the inside of the vest feels dry to the touch, although the outside has the obvious look of something that is saturated. Just remember not to put wallets or cellphones on the inside pockets of your jacket unless you want them to have prolonged contact with the outside of the vest.

BTW, I have spent a year driving a Humm-vee through the Mojave desert and almost two years running around the Iraqi desert so I MIGHT be a little more acclimatized than most. Just food for thought... :roll:

ONE MORE THING: My Dad rides year-round (Colorado) in his Darien and swears by his evaporative cooling vest. He makes trips as far up as Alberta and South as Texas (in the summer). He also rides a HD Road Glide that has better windshield protection... and hence, less "air conditioning" to work the evaporative cooling properties.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Evaporative vests

That's the beauty of my Colorado Coolwear Coolvest, it doesn't stay wet, just cool. They said that they designed it so that the vest dries up quick and still keeps you cool. It's made from Cordura or something. It does work a little better with a jacket with vents.

I can tell you, I rode for over a decade out in the desert southwest and wish I would have had this vest then! All I know is that I don't sweat wearing my helmet and jacket and it's over 90 this week in NC!

Catch you guys later.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,982 Posts
eurofjr said:
I use a Silver Eagle Outfitters evaporative cooling vest and it works pretty well. My jacket is a Tourmaster Cortech Coaster and has the following vents: two in biceps area (3-4 inches), two along back (vertical - 6-7 inches), and two in the upper chest (horizontal - about 2 inches - not very effective). Still, though, I get pretty good cooling effects with a jacket that I'm fairly certain is not all that well vented (most definitely when compared to my leather/mesh jacket).
Another Silver Eagle fan here (http://www.silvereagleoutfitters.com.au/vests.htm), and I would add to Euro's comments re vents - the side pockets of the jacket are also very effective vents, more effective than the upper chest ones. Open them and 'feel the breeze' as it exits from the back vertical vents.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top