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I'm looking for recommendations to house 2-3 switches for accessories. I've seen switch boxes that mount on some models' master cylinders, like the below, but cannot find anything specific to the FJR. What have others done?

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FJR1300A 2008
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Lumpytaters,

There are many ways to go. Some are not cheap. See if anything here will do the job:

Handlebar switches
 

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As far as I know, there isn't anything FJR specific. I think you will need to plan what you want to do around the available switches. OTOH, one other possibility would be to see if you could get AP (police model) electrical parts.
 

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2007 FJR1300A
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Plenty of room on the dash trim pieces for switches.
 

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2014 FJR-A
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There's not much room on the handlebars for a switch. I'd need to find something quite narrow to fit it on the round sections.
Another possibility could be a small dash shelf and mount the switches there. Some find a dash shelf convenient for other accessory mounting solutions, too. Don't know what year model you have, some are easier to add a shelf to than others. Also depends if you lean "function over form", or "form over function" !!
:devilish:😁
There are some dash shelf discussions on this forum if you want to see what others are doing.

dan


Never hesitate to ride past the last streetlight at the edge of town. -- Unknown
 

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There's not much room on the handlebars for a switch. I'd need to find something quite narrow to fit it on the round sections
lumpytaters,

Some of those switches are built on narrow mounts, barely wide enough for the Allen bolts. You might want to try adding handlebar extensions as well, both for bar space and comfort. An extra inch or two (25mm~50mm) can make a lot of difference in your arm comfort.

I am also a fan of ditching the stock FJR (cast) handlebars in favor of conventional 7/8" (22mm) handlebars. That option gives you a very wide range of hand positions for comfort; they should kill any hand-numbing buzz in the grips, and provide a lot of bar space for accessories. I like the ABM billet conversion plate, but you can spend a lot more, or less. Most bike shops will let you take any new handlebars outside (one at a time) to make a quick check of how they might work for you on the bike; just don't bolt them on, unless you paid for them. ;)
 
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Mine are on the left filler panel between the tank and faring, Thats where the light kit I bought suggested
 

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Sometimes there is no off-the-shelf solution. On my AE I couldn't use a standard mount for my J&M CB unit so I had to make my own. It's a steel plate, cut and bent to shape, with longer bolts and spacers to make it fit flat.
I added some aux light switches underneath. Then a few years later I decided to rivet the Audiovox cruise control panel to the same. Works great for me.
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Bounce,

Man, a non-fused terminal strip? Unattached to anything?
I'd prefer to have a relay-controlled fuse block - more money, but every added line will have a fuse. Everything would come on with the ignition switch, and all in one place. I would also nail it down to somewhere.
I'm just picky, I guess, on the electricals. :cool:
 
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Bounce,

Man, a non-fused terminal strip? Unattached to anything?
I'd prefer to have a relay-controlled fuse block - more money, but every added line will have a fuse. Everything would come on with the ignition switch, and all in one place. I would also nail it down to somewhere.
I'm just picky, I guess, on the electricals. :cool:
Each item has an in-line fuse; placed where it's easiest to access in the dark at 3am in the middle of BFE.

Large loads (heated gear, Aux lighting, are driven with a relay and the energizing leg routes to the DIY block.
 

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I have a lead taken from behind the accessory socket in the cubby that goes to under the seat. No good if you want a switch, but out of sight and rain and has camera and heated waistcoat on it.
 

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I have a lead taken from behind the accessory socket in the cubby that goes to under the seat. No good if you want a switch, but out of sight and rain and has camera and heated waistcoat on it.
Linton,

If you are tapping into the line that feeds the accessory socket, that line is only wired (and fused) to handle a few Amps. The camera will probably be okay, but with heated gear, that is asking a lot. Do not use a heavier fuse in that line, as the wire itself may not handle the extra load.

I would strongly suggest using a relay-switched Fuse Block, and working the relay with that accessory wire. Relays draw very little power. Take full battery power into the Fuse Block, straight from the battery, and then everything will turn Off when you remove the ignition key.

My US$ .02 worth . . .
 
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Neutrino black box is what you need. I have been using one for a few years and it works great. No dash mounted switches. All works from phone app. Mount your phone to the bike via any number of options, and you have all your communications, navigation, and accessory switches right there.
 

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I put an auxiliary fuse panel on every bike I own and distribute power from there, either constant on (GPS) or they come on with the ignition key. Switches, well, how many do you really need... I have a USB charger that has it's own voltmeter and switch. Take the GPS out of the cradle if you want it totally off, most have their own switch. Auxiliary lighting, if switching on with the ignition doesn't suit, then put a small switch somewhere out of the way...
 
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I went with dash mounted on my 2005. I also sacrificed my glove box because the solenoid wouldn't let me open it. Dash mounting can be tricky, depending on the depth the switch needs behind it.
 

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I've used Eastern Beaver power distribution setups of various sizes on 3 different bikes. Very high quality gear that is manufactured in Japan. They have an FJR specific PC-8 but I don't need that many circuits so I just used their universal 4CS and it works very well.

Eastern Beaver

As far as switches go, I have used these on a couple of bikes with excellent results. Just have to drill a hole in one of the many dash panels and mount it from the inside.

3 Position Switches

If you collect the $.02 from everyone who offers it on here, it would really add up :LOL:

Cheers
Alex
 
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