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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
(stop me if I asked this before...I have been on three forums for info on my three bikes LOL!) Hi everyone. Long time no see. 2014 FJR runs perfectly. Great ride through S. Utah's National parks last Fall.
I now have 21k on the bike and have decided to change the plugs. I bet they are just fine at that milage but it will make me feel better.
I watched "TwoWheel Obsession" 's great vid with all his hints. I searched here and read some good posts.
A couple of questions.
1. The owner's manual says to not use a plug boot tool, but T.W.O says its OK as long as you work the boot clockwise and CCW first. Thoughts?
(I am 72 and have weak hands.)
2. Anyone use silicon grease on the exterior of the plug boot before reinstalling?
TIA
Yea Olde Coyote
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Nice picture!

I used some dielectric grease on the inside of the boots with the new plugs on the contact but that’s it. No other greases. The boots came out pretty easy too. I do remember twisting back and fourth gently working up and out. Luckily didn’t need the tool. I would have used it carefully if I had to, probably like what the Two Wheel Obsession video shows.

Best of luck!
 

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There are some nubs on the boot inside and they tend to hinder removal, as well as the tops... yes I put silicone grease on those, don't need much. I wouldn't put any dielectric grease on the contact for the spark plugs.
 

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..... I wouldn't put any dielectric grease on the contact for the spark plugs.
Agree 110%. Dielectric grease should never be used ON contacts. It is to be used around them to insulate the contacts from water and dust.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I agree with you guys. I will put a light coating on the outside of the boot to keep water out and also to help removal. I have also found it useful to put a VERY TINY BIT of anti-sieze compound on the new plug threads. (Utah is a great place to do an extended two week camping trip to in late Sept. No rain to get at those plugs....I usually go to the Reno National Air Races on my bike in Sept. but last year they were canceled. Utah was a treat. In fact, All summer long, the motels were empty and the campgrounds were full)
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a light bit of anti-seize on the plug threads is good, I also put a light coat of dielectric grease on the boot outside contact points and also on the plug porcelain as the contact between there and the plug boots tend to not want to come apart with time which can result in torn boots. That’s what I do ! By the way really nice color bike ! I bet it’s really fast ! 😜
 

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Hey Coyote... I also agree on using some anti-seize on the spark plug threads. There, with that said to prevent this being perceived as a thread hijack... ;)

I'm kinda new to the FJR, I'm looking at 2013-and up models, hopefully getting one sometime this summer. Seems like all the 2014s I've seen have the body panel right under the seat in a silver color... blends in with the frame and engine cases. But yours is red to match the rest of the bike. Is that a customization you've done? Was it an option from the factory?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hey Coyote... I also agree on using some anti-seize on the spark plug threads. There, with that said to prevent this being perceived as a thread hijack... ;)

I'm kinda new to the FJR, I'm looking at 2013-and up models, hopefully getting one sometime this summer. Seems like all the 2014s I've seen have the body panel right under the seat in a silver color... blends in with the frame and engine cases. But yours is red to match the rest of the bike. Is that a customization you've done? Was it an option from the factory?
actually, there is a part number for the red pannels. P6 and P7
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
a light bit of anti-seize on the plug threads is good, I also put a light coat of dielectric grease on the boot outside contact points and also on the plug porcelain as the contact between there and the plug boots tend to not want to come apart with time which can result in torn boots. That’s what I do ! By the way really nice color bike ! I bet it’s really fast ! 😜
Actually, I had not thought about that but that is a good idea. Just brush a tad on the porcelain. The red ones are the fastest. I had a red Honda NT700v, I have a red Honda VFR, and a Red FJR.
If you downshift and try to pass a truck with an NT700v, you pray there is a God,
If you downshift and try to pass a truck with a VFR you know there is a God.
But, if you downshift and pass a truck with an FJR, you can SEE God! (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks to all that helped! Got the plugs in today. New plugs came gapped at .033. Old plugs were worn to .035-6. Looked good at 21,550. Boots (coil packs) turned easily but old arthritic fingers couldnt pull them so I used a needle nose pack puller. Interesting that number one plug pack was pointed 90 degrees away from others. See pic. Used bungies to hold tank up with bingo fuel on board. Used a bit of anti sieze compound on the new threads and silicon grease on the ceremic of the plug plus a little on contact points on the boots. Does anyone know what the metal strip running the length of the coil pack is for? See pic. Two Wheel Ob's vid was good but the silver tank trim is a bit more complex to remove and put on than said. Should have watched his balance vid, I guess. One of the push pins was missing but I had spares as they are the same as the belly pan/lower cowl of my VFR. (Who ever designed the top of the engine seems to own a hose factory.)
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Not sure why the number one plug wires were routed like that but there was clearance for the T-Bar so I didnt change it.
 

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#1 is turned sideways so you have clearance to the T-bar..... most T-bars can't be installed unless it is....
Is the T-Bar you're referring to as the metal strip? Integral frame member.
Most of that plumbing is the PAIR system, which many remove to clean up the engine bay.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
#1 is turned sideways so you have clearance to the T-bar..... most T-bars can't be installed unless it is....
Is the T-Bar you're referring to as the metal strip? Integral frame member.
Most of that plumbing is the PAIR system, which many remove to clean up the engine bay.
Thanks Ray. Here is the T bar. Its a part of the frame and the bolts need to be torqued to 56 Ft/lbs IIRC.
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Torque on the T-bar bolts is 27 ft. lbs, not 56..... FYI
 

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Dielectric grease melts at a low temperature where silicone grease is used in braking systems, is best on rubber parts and is rated extremely high, well above 500F... where you want it in the hot head area. Use silicone grease whenever possible with rubber
 
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