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2014 Yamaha FJR1300
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
UPDATE:
The distortion to the inner lining of the inner tube was not a consequence of my work so I ignored it. The outer tube damage did not touch sealing surfaces or moving parts, so I gave it and the corrosion a light sanding with 1000 grit.
All smooth until I tried to spec torque the damping rod bolt that comes up the bottom of the outer tube. Snapped the threaded boss right off the bottom of the damping rod. The cause was either stickiness in the torque wrench or the cheap, too-thin copper sealing washer I used. The wrench is accurate, but I definitely pulled it past 35 N-m (~25 Ft-lbs) in hindsight.
Be warned and be careful, that part can't be replaced. I either need to buy $1000 of 2016 forks like another user who did the same, or try my luck finding a talented aluminum TIG welder.
Added a picture of the snap.
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Working on a 2014
Hey all,
I tried rebuilding my forks, and it was going fine until it took excessive force to "slide hammer" the inner tube out with the oil seal and bushings. It was too cold and the aluminum outer tube was too shrunk. (Lesson learned). The inner tube squeezed out of all the bushings and seal while they remained in the outer tube, and I foolishly used a real slide hammer tool to "carefully" remove them before realizing I could just pop the outer tube in the oven and shake things out.
The oil seal seat is gouged, and the inner tube surfaced is dented. New tubes would run me about $450 (ouch), so I thought I'd ask first,
Do you agree that replacing these tubes is critical? First 2 pics are the outer tube oil seal seat, last is the inner tube dents.
Many thanks for opinions!
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Versys 1000, VFR800
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Your first two pics don't bother me a bit..... looks like some residual seal material on the seal bore, you can likely clean that up easily enough with a solvent and a mild abrasive like steel wool or Scotchbrite. As for the wee gouges at the upper bushing seat, just ensure no obvious burrs. Nothing around the upper bushing has to be oil tight, and you have full support for the bushing no problem. As for the seal, clean up that area but I'd use some grease on the OD of the seal and it might help get it out easier next time.

I'm not sure what your last pic is, looks like at the very bottom of the outer tube. I'd attempt to smooth off any burrs as best you can, maybe with a piece of PVC or ABS pipe with some 3-400 grit paper, working only on the burrs. As long as no burrs, the bushing will slide up and down with adequate surface area (and oil film). Me personally would not go out and buy any new tubes, I'd refurb those. Before you put anything back together, give the tubes a nice rinse with isopropanol or even brake cleaner to flush out any sanding dust, lube up your bushings with fork oil and away you go.......

I don't recall the mileage you had on these..... how about a pic of your old lower bushing. From my experience, mileage can vary, but lower bushing wear happens around 20-30-40k depending on the riding you do, and that's when I'd go in there next. Unless you have a seal leak, then you don't have a lot of choice (hint, keep fork tubes clean).
 

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I agree with rayzerman. After cleaning the lower boots, I prefer to put oil on the internal surfaces as well as the bushing for reassembly. The top pics don't bother me either, and I'm confused by the last one as well. Deburr and put back together. At worst you might damage one of the lower bushings if those are gouges down inside the boot.

Agree keeping tubes clean is the best way to protect the seals. I've used NOJ neoprene rubber covers (other brands available) for 25+ yrs on many bikes. Rarely replace seals (except when I buy the used bike and end up replacing them because the previous owner didn't cover them).

If you end up needing boots, I might know where some are, but from older models. Don't know about compatibility I suspect used/salvaged are available..
 

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All smooth until I tried to spec torque the damping rod bolt that comes up the bottom of the outer tube. Snapped the threaded boss right off the bottom of the damping rod. The cause was either stickiness in the torque wrench or the cheap, too-thin copper sealing washer I used. The wrench is accurate, but I definitely pulled it past 35 N-m (~25 Ft-lbs) in hindsight.
Be warned and be careful, that part can't be replaced. I either need to buy $1000 of 2016 forks like another user who did the same, or try my luck finding a talented aluminum TIG welder.
Added a picture of the snap.
No expert on FJR forks, but are you sure that bottom piece does not thread into the main fork tube? From the pic it does not appear to all be machined as one piece. If it were 1 piece, there would be no need for the flats machined into it. A parts fiche might answer, or a fork rebuilder might know. If a separate part, but is not available separately, 2 options 1) salvage parts, 2) local machine shop make a new one.
 

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2007 FJR1300A
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2,196 Posts
No expert on FJR forks, but are you sure that bottom piece does not thread into the main fork tube? From the pic it does not appear to all be machined as one piece. If it were 1 piece, there would be no need for the flats machined into it. A parts fiche might answer, or a fork rebuilder might know. If a separate part, but is not available separately, 2 options 1) salvage parts, 2) local machine shop make a new one.
The flat (there is only 1 as I recall) indexes into the lower fork where the adjustment screw is.
 

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2014 FJR-A
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151 Posts
Be warned and be careful, that part can't be replaced. I either need to buy $1000 of 2016 forks like another user who did the same, or try my luck finding a talented aluminum TIG welder.
We've seen this sort of damage several times in the last couple of years. The neck of the compression valve seems to be a weak spot on the later cartridges. On the 2013 and later forks, the right fork does all the compression / rebound valve work. The left fork only contains a spring with no valving.

As far as repair, there are several choices.
You might appeal to other forum members who have upgraded their forks to other cartridges and may have the old, unused OEM cartridges left over, and who might be willing to part with them.

Or, the broken OEM compression valve can be replaced with a RaceTech replacement compression valve, which would also give the benefit of custom valving. The flats on the OEM compression valve body are where the wrench goes to un-screw the valve from the cartridge body. The cartridge must be clamped in a holding fixture while un-screwing / replacing the valve body to avoid crushing the cartridge. Or, send the cartridge to RaceTech and have them do the work.

Or, you could upgrade the forks to complete replacement cartridges for suspension that would be custom tuned for your weight and riding style. Several choices there.

Or, if you feel like you must purchase new forks, you only need to purchase the right fork. No need to purchase the pair since only the right fork has the compression / rebound valving, and the left fork is only sprung with a dummy cartridge and no valving. That is, unless both had their necks snapped off.

Edit: There has been speculation that the torque spec in the FSM may be too high for this fastener, the same as too high for the engine oil drain plug. Usually, the torque spec for a fastener is for dry threads (unless specifically stated for lubricated threads), and the engine oil drain plug and that thread on the compression valve to assemble the forks are almost always going to have oil on them. In which case the torque should be reduced to avoid stripping or snapping that compression valve neck.


dan


Waste your money and you're only out of money, but waste your time and you've lost part of your life. -- Michael Leboeuf
 

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Versys 1000, VFR800
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OK I see now your pic of the broken cartridge I didn't see before....... new info.... in the past you couldn't buy a cartridge (from Partzilla at least), I see now Babbits has them listed.... a little confusing which is right and which is left, the left one is a dummy cartridge, the right one has all the workings..... might want to give them a phone call........
 

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2014 FJR-A
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151 Posts
OK I see now your pic of the broken cartridge I didn't see before....... new info.... in the past you couldn't buy a cartridge (from Partzilla at least), I see now Babbits has them listed.... a little confusing which is right and which is left, the left one is a dummy cartridge, the right one has all the workings..... might want to give them a phone call........

Uh, that link takes us to the fork works for the ES (US) model. I don't think those parts fit the A (US) model.

Edit: I don't have direct personal experience with the ES forks, but, I think one fork leg has the compression valve cartridge and the other fork leg has the rebound valve cartridge.


dan


Never let the truth get in the way of a good story. -- Mark Twain
 

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FORK me, there I am being wrong again. Not enough coffee.
OK, confirmed, no cartridges available for 13-15.... which I never understood. I would seek aftermarket valving, but call RaceTech to see if they have single-side valves.
I suspect the reason these years are breaking is because they have been slimmed down over previous, in some quest for weight reduction perhaps.
 

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2014 FJR-A
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151 Posts
UPDATE:
All smooth until I tried to spec torque the damping rod bolt that comes up the bottom of the outer tube. Snapped the threaded boss right off the bottom of the damping rod. The cause was either stickiness in the torque wrench or the cheap, too-thin copper sealing washer I used. The wrench is accurate, but I definitely pulled it past 35 N-m (~25 Ft-lbs) in hindsight.
Be warned and be careful, that part can't be replaced. I either need to buy $1000 of 2016 forks like another user who did the same, or try my luck finding a talented aluminum TIG welder.
Added a picture of the snap. View attachment 84923
Carl,
It's been 3 weeks or so, and this discussion has slipped from the collective consciousness of the forum.
But, expiring minds want to know!
What was your solution to the broken compression valve?
Do you have everything back together?


dan



Everyone should believe in something; I believe I'll have another drink. -- W.C. Fields
 

·
Registered
2014 FJR-A
Joined
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151 Posts
UPDATE:
All smooth until I tried to spec torque the damping rod bolt that comes up the bottom of the outer tube. Snapped the threaded boss right off the bottom of the damping rod. The cause was either stickiness in the torque wrench or the cheap, too-thin copper sealing washer I used. The wrench is accurate, but I definitely pulled it past 35 N-m (~25 Ft-lbs) in hindsight.
Be warned and be careful, that part can't be replaced. I either need to buy $1000 of 2016 forks like another user who did the same, or try my luck finding a talented aluminum TIG welder.
Added a picture of the snap. View attachment 84923
Carl,
It's been 3 weeks or so, and this discussion has slipped from the collective consciousness of the forum.
But, expiring minds want to know!
What was your solution to the broken compression valve?
Do you have everything back together?


dan



Everyone should believe in something; I believe I'll have another drink. -- W.C. Fields

Sorry for the re-post, I couldn't get it right the first time.
 
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