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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am pulling the front wheel on my '04 abs model, first time I have done it. Pulled the callipers on the right side first, no problem, now doing the left side, just about there, but the ABS sensor has to be removed from the housing. The little sucker won't budge, I have removed the bolt that secures it, and the thing is obviously magnetic, but nowhere in the service manual does it say this is difficult or requires any special technique. I do not want to gouge the $hit out of it or mess up the sen$or
so any tips from those who have done it would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
For those interested, I used a box knife to pry between the sensor bracket and the housing, gradually moving the sensor back and forth. It was very stiff but I got it to the point where a flat blade of a screw driver could be inserted and gently worked it out. Here is what I found...


Sad to think this must be occuring at a number of sites on the bike.
The price of riding year round? Or just a fact of life with aluminum parts?
 

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Rocket Doc : It looks like Galvanic Corrosion caused by direct contact between dissimilar metals and oxidation of the Aluminum as well.
Sensor Stainless, Housing Aluminum.
When you reassemble use some dielectric grease with a layer on Antiseize on the outside to prevent more problems.
Do the same procedure on the Rear Sensor as Well
Twister
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Good tip, I was thinking of some kind of lube, the dielectric grease should do the trick. Antiseize?? I am not familiar with that stuff, put it on first then the grease?
 

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rocketdoc said:
Good tip, I was thinking of some kind of lube, the dielectric grease should do the trick. Antiseize?? I am not familiar with that stuff, put it on first then the grease?
Antisieze Used commonly on spark plug threads going into aluminum heads.
made by several manufactures , containes graphite.
Champion, Permatex, ect., etc,
Dielectric first then Antiseize.
Twister
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well it is all back together now. The ABS sensor housing cleaned up very nicely with some 000 steel wool, the sensor just wiped clean easily. Applied a thin layer of WD-40 on the sensor bracket only. The new Avon is fitted and now just waiting for the roads to dry to wear in the new tire.
Thank you all for the suggestions.
 

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I'd go with the anti-seize, WD 40 absorbs moisture as it is hydrosopic.
That's why you can spray it on a wet distributor. I screwed up some parts I laid up with WD40, only to have to clean all the rust off later.

Dielectric grease would work as it would seal out the moisture.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Powerman, I thought WD would do the trick, but since you mentioned it, I will use antiseize on the rear and see how both look in four months.
 

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Rocketdoc, I was reading where WD-40 might have been developed to protect ICBM parts. Your field? LOL

WD-40 is a short term solution. I had a shotgun rust when coated with it.
I grabbed a can that was handy and coated a lightened Porsche racing flywheel and put it in a plastic bag, it rusted in a year so badly it had to be bead blasted.
 

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WD40...indeed it does work to displace moisture, but that's about it. For a long-term lubricant that protects metal, try Break-Free. It's available at most sporting goods stores and Wal-Mart. Stuff is great!!!!!!
 
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