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I just sold a car to a guy who said he was running nitrogen in his current set of SUV tires. He said they had already accumulated the mileage of his last set of tires, but that they still had about half their tread life remaining.

That got my attention.

Does anyone have experience using nitrogen in either their two-wheel or four-wheel street vehicle tires? If so, does nitrogen significantly increase tire life? And where does a person find it?
 

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cinderbob said:
...nitrogen in his current set of SUV tires. He said they had already accumulated the mileage of his last set of tires, but that they still had about half their tread life remaining.
Maybe he's a nitrogen dealer? :crylarf:

No way that's possible, or logical... IMHO.

:)
 

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I don't think twice the tire life could be expected, BUT, the tires WILL run much cooler. That.... will/may extend some tire life. I would not use nitrogen in two wheel tires.
 

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Nitrogen

I wasn't a chemistry major in school, but I do remember that a major component of the air we breath is nitorgen.

The differrence between compressed air and compressed nitogen is that commercial nitogen compressing removes all the water vapor. Compressed air is just the what ever is floating around the compressor. The lack of water vapor is what makes the difference, not the chemical composition.

Because of the lack of water, nitrogen will react less to changes in heat. As far as I can tell, that is the only difference.

Race cars use it for that reason and the portability the compressed nitrogen cylinder provides. All else is advertising hokum.
 

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petey said:
I don't think twice the tire life could be expected, BUT, the tires WILL run much cooler. That.... will/may extend some tire life. I would not use nitrogen in two wheel tires.
They will not run cooler. The only difference is that there are less pressure changes between hot and cold.
 

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Well if PV=nRT and if P remains more constant, then one must conclude that with V remaining constant, that T also remains more constant ie. cooler.
See all that highschool physics was useful for something.
:roll:
 

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rocketdoc said:
Well if PV=nRT and if P remains more constant, then one must conclude that with V remaining constant, that T also remains more constant ie. cooler.
You can't use that equation for this problem, teach. :lol: Back to class for you. :wink:

:)
 

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Re: nitrogen

number2 said:
I take it the bikini patrol is over.
Si.

(but you should see the skirt in front of me at the DMV :D )

:)
 

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Liquidsilver said:
rocketdoc said:
Well if PV=nRT and if P remains more constant, then one must conclude that with V remaining constant, that T also remains more constant ie. cooler.
You can't use that equation for this problem, teach. :lol: Back to class for you. :wink:

:)
Gee, sorry....I thought we were talking about gases here. One law when it comes to gases, temperature and pressure.
It may not be what we are talking about though.
I think I will stick to good old fashioned air in tires, monitored continuously with this
http://www.smartire.com/products/motorcycles/index.html
 

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Liquidsilver said:
rocketdoc said:
Well if PV=nRT and if P remains more constant, then one must conclude that with V remaining constant, that T also remains more constant ie. cooler.
You can't use that equation for this problem, teach. :lol: Back to class for you. :wink: :)
Hey, you are both wrong!

The formula does work in a tyre/tire BUT it is only valid for the same gas.
Ie, moist air will expand more than dry Nitrogen at the same temperature difference.
In the example of the tyre, the gas will have no impact on the temperature. The temperature will be a result of the mechanical forces on the tyre.

Another interesting trivia on the subject of tyres and gases: If you fill a (cold) tyre with refrigerant (which by default expands a lot with temperature), it will explode after you driven about 2 miles down the M-way. How do I know this? - I had once an ingenious apprentice who wrote my van off after 2 miles on the M-way and when the police investigator were supprised that the tyre had blown, he openly admitted that he had filled it with R22. :shock:

:ale:
 

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Thanks professor. :p

(you sure that's not what I meant? :wink: :ale: )



:)
 

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Well, I guess I was all wet with my earlier post about nitrogen filled tires :oops: That's what I get for beleaving a fellow who supposedly had taken temp readings with and without nitrogen filled tires.
I stand corrected 8)
 

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I'm not a chemist or a physicist, but I wonder if it's possible for the properties of atmospheric air and water vapor inside the tire (as opposed to straight nitrogen) to have frictional properties from within the tire, causing more heat to build.

I doubt it would be significant, but still a possibility, no?

This is why nitrogen is used in shocks, and some way-high-dollar forks with little reserviors on them... nitrogen's volume and flow properties stay consistent over a wide range of temps. If a shock had strictly air in it... its behavior would change vastly as it got hot, because the properties of atmosheric air change so much. On a cool day, earlier this spring, I was doing laps on a motocross track... when I stopped to rest, I let my thigh rest in contact with the shock reservoir - darn near burned a hole in my pants.


:)
 

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It has nothing to do with temps, but the lack of change in characteristics over a temp range as you so nicely describe with your shock example.

FWIW: Tires will end up being nitrogen filled by themselves. The oxygen in air is small enough to escape between the molecules of the tire, leaving the the larger nitrogen molecules trapped inside. :) Sure it happens slowly, but it does happen.
 

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Surely if all the oxygen that has escaped isn't replaced the tyre would lose pressure as there would be a smaller volume of 'air' in there now. If that's the case why do my tyres keep a constant pressure?
 

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It does mean that, and I said it was a slow process. :)

All tires lose pressure over time, due to the leaking of oxygen. Good tires take a long time though.
 

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afterburn said:
All tires lose pressure over time, due to the leaking of oxygen. Good tires take a long time though.
That's interesting. I've noticed that some tires 'seep' more than others, but I didn't know that there was a gas separation taking place. Seems like full-sport tires weep more than sport-touring tires, too.

Is it just the nitrogen that remains, as the O2, CO2 and others seep through?

:)
 
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