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There’s definitely a Michelin tax on their bike and auto tires. I loathe Michelins. It goes way back to my early track days; they were so slow to heat up and then lost the heat quickly. I’ve been on Pirellis for the last 25-30 years.
 
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2016 FJR1300AK
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I charge $20/tire regardless if it's on the bike or off. Bought my NoMar used several years ago for $400 and probably done 70-90 tire changes since.
Probably my best motorcycle investment.
 

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2003 FJR1300R / 2007 Husq SMR 510
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I asked at the local CycleGear just out of curiosity and heard the same statement mentioned twice. "...it can be extra if we need to replace a valve stem or true the wheel."
I just assumed they are charging for both every time.
 

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I bought a set of Michelin PR4GTs earlier this year for $360 and got a $50 rebate (spent that on gas today :) ), so $310 net. I mounted them last week for free.

No, PR4s aren't the latest and greatest today, but they were just a few years ago; people on these forums were raving about them. They're still good tire. :)
 
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I asked at the local CycleGear just out of curiosity and heard the same statement mentioned twice. "...it can be extra if we need to replace a valve stem or true the wheel."
I just assumed they are charging for both every time.
"Truing" a wheel is a whole different animal than balancing a tire. If your rim truly is bent, then straightening it can require expertise beyond a typical bike dealer.

VALVE STEMS
I worked in three different motorcycle dealers in the N East, and we never changed valve stems, unless there was some reason to.
I rode out to California some years ago, and had both tires changed in a downtown San Francisco Suzuki dealer, (and it wasn't cheap, even back then). They added fifty dollars onto the job... for new valve stems, which they claimed "they always did". I was surprised and argued about it until they scratched the 50 off the bill. I found it to be a scam.
TELL me if there will be any "extra charges" (or work, or parts) IN ADVANCE, please. I dislike dealing with unknown Service departments, (and many that I DO know).
 

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I put these on all my bikes at the first tire change. They seem to last pretty much forever I've even removed one from a bent rim and installed it on the replacement. I have seen the rubber stems deteriorate over time and break leaving the rider sitting next to the interstate with a flat tire. For that reason, I did replace the rubber stems every other tire change or so, just in case. Camera accessory Font Bicycle part Auto part Rectangle
 
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I guess I'm lucky. My local Honda dealer will replace & balance 1 wheel for $30. If I bring both at the same time it's $50. And that's the price whether I buy the tires from him or not. It's not even worth my sweat to attempt to change my own tires.
Between all my bikes, it's typical to change at least 10 tires a year, and rarely both front and rear at the same time. $300/yr paid off the No-Mar changer in 2 years. By the time you drive to the dealer and back I'm done, so no more time. My garage is heated/cooled, so no sweat or cold fingers. Keep tires in stock, no waiting for them to come in. Tires stored in a closet under the stairs in the house. Mounted up to 5 year old tires that worked just fine.

I put these on all my bikes at the first tire change. They seem to last pretty much forever I've even removed one from a bent rim and installed it on the replacement. I have seen the rubber stems deteriorate over time and break leaving the rider sitting next to the interstate with a flat tire. For that reason, I did replace the rubber stems every other tire change or so, just in case. View attachment 85481
Did the same. These work well.

For those that want to go the cheap route like the no scuff website, just buy the No-Mar mount/demount bar, a bit more expensive and worth it. The mounting end is much better. Thicker blocks of wood than he shows work a bit better - you want the edge of the bead pushed down even with where the inner rim lip is. Paste tire lube is better than the liquid for mounting. Put some paste in a sprayer and add water to make thin lube for demounting. The no scuff guy's info is pretty good.
 

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I built one and it works great.

I used a 13" rim and it clears the front wheel rotors with room for the vertical piece that stops the wheel from rotating. I think any rim larger than 13" might be too big to allow the motorcycle wheel's spokes to rest on the edge of the car rim. I used 1" heater hose on the top edge of the car rim and a piece of garden hose over the vertical wheel stop but I have yet to grind all the extra threads off the centre post. I did however make a very large wingnut so spinning the nut all the way down the centre post is reasonably quick.

I also bought the No-Scuff Tire Tool. It works but takes some practice. Stiff sport-touring rear tires can be a challenge with the Tire Tool but front tires are incredibly easy to dismount/mount with the bar. For stiff rear tires, break the tire's bead, clamp the wheel on the mounting stand and use rim protectors and 3 (or 4) curved tire irons for the first bead. The bar will easily pop the second bead off the rim.

Whether you use the bar or not, the best things about the mounting stand are that it gets you up off the floor and it very securely holds you wheel.

Haynes

View attachment 85473
Thanks Haynes. Is it weird that I'm looking forward to my next tire change now? My one son has a Suzuki SV 650 that will need it this summer. Between my two sons we have my FJR, his SV 650, 83 Honda CB 650 and a DR 650 so I expect it will get some good use....once it's built. ;-)
 

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2007 FJR1300A
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I used to have a HF tire changer that I modified a bit, but it took up a lot of room and didn't really save me any time over the HD bucket and spoons. I will say that I take the rotors off when I do tire changes just to avoid any accidental damage. With the zip gun it doesn't add more than an extra couple minutes. Have a set to install tomorrow morning on the FZ1.
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Tread Automotive design
 

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2003 FJR1300R / 2007 Husq SMR 510
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Tire Wheel Automotive tire Tread Synthetic rubber

Pirelli ST’s after 1100. Not being too aggressive with em. I thought the little design was like a “wear in” indicator or something like that but I dunno. They run great.
 

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Got an email today from HF with new tool offerings and thought I'd drop it here for lack of a better place at the moment. Absolutely no experience with it and wondering if that wingnut would need a little attention.

Linky

Automotive tire Metal Font Fashion accessory Auto part
 

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2007 FJR1300A
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Looks cool - I would add a big washer so that it is not pressing on the seal.
 

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Got an email today from HF with new tool offerings and thought I'd drop it here for lack of a better place at the moment. Absolutely no experience with it and wondering if that wingnut would need a little attention.

Linky
It looks like it's just a bead breaker. If that's the case, you'd still need a way to remove and replace a tire with it.
 

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It looks like it's just a bead breaker. If that's the case, you'd still need a way to remove and replace a tire with it.
It's also basically the same thing that people are building with those 13 inch car rims. You would use spoons with it

Same thing with Tusk branding, except that it looks fully welded
 

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They show it as a Tire Change Stand but yeah, I don't know. If you're going to work the spoons and/or bar I'd imagine you'd still have to find a way to clamp it down somehow. And one of the knocks on my tweaked up HF auto tire changer is that it's a tad too high. When I'm struggling with a tire - which is usually always - I sometimes will employ a milkcrate or step stool under myself for a little extra height and leverage. This thing takes it a bit too far in the other direction. Don't like working on my knees if I can help it.
 

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They show it as a Tire Change Stand but yeah, I don't know. If you're going to work the spoons and/or bar I'd imagine you'd still have to find a way to clamp it down somehow. And one of the knocks on my tweaked up HF auto tire changer is that it's a tad too high. When I'm struggling with a tire - which is usually always - I sometimes will employ a milkcrate or step stool under myself for a little extra height and leverage. This thing takes it a bit too far in the other direction. Don't like working on my knees if I can help it.
It's also basically the same thing that people are building with those 13 inch car rims. You would use spoons with it
Yep. I use an old HF tire changer, but the bar that comes with it is only useful in the bead breaker. I just used the stand to hold the wheel down while I spooned the tires on. Then I got a MojoLever, and that works like a charm with that stand. I pad the grippers on the stand with pieces of milk jug zip tied in place, and use the Mojolever to spin the old tire off and the new tire on. It works well.
 

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Hello group.
I need a reality check.
My beloved 2018 FJR rolled over 9k miles ( broken shoulder, pandemic, etc) resulted in this low miles.

both of my tires starting to look shady. I commute 135 miles per day about 3-4 times a week between dirt road, canyon path, interstate and Denver traffic.
My factory rear had a flat within 200 miles of leaving dealer and I was riding 200 mile each way so I put a brand new Dunlop in 2018.

So back to my reality check need. I am not much of the tire snoob. With the riding i do and where I am I thought Michelin Road 5 GT would do me good. Called dealer, since they always taught to be a place to get the tires... so Tires; 5GT got replaced by 6GT - ok i recalled when they called Pilots and 2 compound thing was the latest and greatest. I was told 6gt are the same money.... front like $250 and rear was like $280... i don't recall paying that but inflation, covid, etc etc.
Now installation is where i sad something wrong and I am not taking up dry like that. Front tire mount is 2+ hours labor and rear was over an hour... yep close to $500 for mounting, balancing wheels and re-installing on the bike.
What the hell? I recall taking rear tire on the side of the road in like 10 minutes. I have done front tires on ABS bikes and I don't recall any issues. Have i lost touch with the reality or the dealer that I bought my bike ( actually multiple bikes), had recalls and basically most of my needs off to deep end or i need to adjust to a $1K tire change on FJR?


I called another shop and they will do tires off the bike, but i never dealt with them so i am a bit iffy. But whole situation feels to me like crap.


I am in South Denver. Dealer at question is Apex in Colorado springs, the independent shop is Tfog in Arvada.

If locals can chime in- great. If you have done recently tire change and just general labor rate, what is it?

Thanks.
Ride safe.
Peak Performance Powersports off Wadsworth and 20th have mounted tires for me at $25 ea off the bike. Great guys to work with. For tires locally, Ride On located on Colfax just down the street to the west from G-Force has always had the best prices for tires around and a fairly good selection. They are very old school and do not list their products online.
 
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