FJR Owners Forum banner
  • Hey Everyone! Enter your bike HERE to be a part of this months Bike of the Month Challenge!
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·




Back home from my memorable Austrian Alps trip (I hope to have the story and many pictures of it soon in my website), on past Wednesday I picked-up my brand new "silver storm" Yamaha FJR 1300 A/S model (electronically controlled clutch-less shifting device), as far as I know the first A/S model sold in Portugal. 8)

After riding my new FJR for over 300 km in the most diverse conditions, I think I'm able to share with you my first impressions on this new system that, in contrary of what some believes, it is not a similar automatic transmission system already used in maxi-scooters, but an innovative technology, resembling the one used in Formula 1 cars, which I'm certain will be the future of street motorcycling.

I must confess that the first kilometres I rode the bike were quite confusing, even a bit scaring, but I got used to this new and revolutionary YCC-S system (Yamaha Chip Controlled Shift) quite rapidly, which pros and cons I want to share with you:

Pros:
  • The option for the fist (manual) sequential box is the ideal for city traffic, which demands many but not fast gear box changes. It will also be the case for long trips. The system is extremely simple, efficient and, above all, very comfortable.
  • The possibility of using simultaneously the sequential hand and foot gear box (without shift, of course) is the ideal for faster and sport riding, that demand fast changes of gear box and the necessary power in the exact moments. I use the left fist gear selector to go up the speeds and the foot selector for the gear box reductions. This technique is the ideal therefore allowing an absolute concentration on the bike's braking and acceleration control.
  • When it is necessary to engage a lower or higher speed, because of the engine's regimen, the gear box indicator, very well located in the instrument panel, starts blinking, what it is a very good riding assistant.
  • It is not necessary to decelerate when engaging the sequential speeds, what make the new A/S faster than the previous model, because gear box changes are more rapid, either in acceleration or in speed reductions.
  • Although it does not bring any advantage for who lives in a temperate climate, like me, the A/S model is equipped with a fists warming system. Having in mind my long Europe trip, I would rather prefer the new FJR equipped with a serial "cruise-control".
Cons:
  • The lack of "cluch control point", in such a powerful and quite heavy bike, can lead to some initial confusion until we find the ideal acceleration point, in order that the bike can start running in a soft and safe manner. I only found this ideal acceleration point after a good set of "stop and go" tests. It also requires some adaptation in snaky mountain roads, when you need to control the engine power at low speeds while passing by a climbing sharp bends.
  • The hand reduction gear box button is next to the horn, what can initially originate some unwanted and dangerous "horn reductions"…
In general terms and after everything that was already said and written about this new FJR 2006 model (better general malleability, enhanced brakes, softer and less noisy gear box, legs engine heat stop, etc.), I still believe that the FJR's powerful engine deserves a 6ª speed.

Although the instruments panel design and presentation is much better and visible that in the previous model, in my opinion the flashlights indicators are too small. If in the previous model, which the flashlight indicators were enormous, I used to forget it on very often, now it's even worst for me. Perhaps I'm getting too old … :oops:

On the other hand the original windshield, at least for my 1,85 meters of height, still not provides the necessary frontal wind protection, so I ordered already a higher GIVI windshield.

Finally, the new designed and greater dimension rear view mirrors provide a much better visibility, which is very important especially in long trips. Now those larger mirrors can also be seen by the passenger, who can help the driver in more delicate situations or even in some distraction.

In brief, I am very much happy with my new FJR A/S. Comparing with the normal model price, I think that it worth paying more 2.500 euros for the A/S model. This revolutionary new YCC-S system, that is already a reality for Yamaha, I'm sure it will be the future for all other street bikes !
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,982 Posts
Pierre-Lima, thanks for the comments. I am looking forward to your story of your Austrian Alps trip - your trip stories are always a good read.

Enjoy your new bike, it sounds like you have made the right choice for your needs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
2006 FJR1300AE

I agree with three comments made in the post that started this thread:

1.) A 6th gear would be very nice, especially for highway cruising. I feel that the engine should be running 2500RPM at 70MPH, but is running in the mid to high 3000's.

2.) Electronic cruise control - the Honda 1300 has it, but the FJR does not.

3.) The electronic clutch will become the norm for touring and many sport touring cycles over the next three to five years. The FJR1300 is a land-based missle, and the finger shifter couldn't be smoother. Hats off to Yamaha! :D

Note on the mirrors: they fold forward to the point that they are parallel with the bike. This came in handy the second day I owned the bike. I was unloading it in a narrow space. Folding the mirrors forward gave me some breathing room.

One interesting thing about the Y-CCS (electronic clutch): You may have grown used to revving the engine occassionally while sitting at a stoplight. Whether to hear the sound of the pipes, or scare onlookers, or challenge four-wheeled vehicles, revving up can be fun on occassion. The FJR1300AE can ONLY be revved in Neutral. DO NOT rap the throttle while sitting in first gear at idle (which is what the bike does, if you want it to.) You will launch like a rocket. Also, the manual states that if you drop the clutch from neutral to first while over 1300RPM it won't allow it to happen. You must be under 1300RPM to place the bike in to first gear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,589 Posts
Re: 2006 FJR1300AE

tfruth said:
1.) A 6th gear would be very nice, especially for highway cruising. I feel that the engine should be running 2500RPM at 70MPH, but is running in the mid to high 3000's.

2.) Electronic cruise control - the Honda 1300 has it, but the FJR does not.
At 2500 rpm at 70 mph, you roll on the throttle and nothing would happen. With the current gearing, you still have good thrust without downshifting at 70 mph.

I was not aware the ST 1300 had factory cruise control, are you sure about that?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Hi Pierre

Good read, very much looking forward to your Austria reoprt.

As to your observations on AS and specifically to:
"Although the instruments panel design and presentation is much better and visible that in the previous model, in my opinion the flashlights indicators are too small. If in the previous model, which the flashlight indicators were enormous, I used to forget it on very often, now it’s even worst for me."
Can I make a suggestion which you might consider to help solve small
indicator warning light "problem". I use blue high intensity LED's on a
couple of my bikes mounted either on the fairing (FJR) or windscreen (GTS) on neat sticky tabs. Most car accessory shops will have these in various shapes and sizes for "localised" lighting inside cars. The ones I use
are less than 20mm long with a 180deg. swivel,this is needed as the LED's can be dazzaling at night. No modification to the fairing or wiring is required and they can be "piggyback" wired to the indicators with no damage to the connector pins if done carefully.I ran the wires down into the screen adjusting arm slots so very little of the wiring is visible and
mounted the LED's on the "high" part of the fairing. Some people think their part of an alarm system! Of course audible warning is another option
which I found is OK on smaller bikes but maybe not for the FJR.
It's the first mod I always consider no matter which bike and I for one would not be without the additional LED's.
A lot of the LED's sold are designed to plug into the cigar lighter-but you
can chop these off-but do remeber to place a resistor inline if that component is on the bit your discarding.
Hope this helps
Regards.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
bigwave said:
Very interesting Pierre.
Can you tell me where is the "mando de luces en rafagas (flash)"
I cant see it
You caught me :oops: . Those second and third pictures from top, on my website, were taken from an American site (I was too lazy to take them myself :roll: ) ... the European model do have a flash light on the left fist, like the previous model. I'll change those pictures ASAP 8)

@ John Griffin,

Thank you very much for your most useful suggestion about the turn indicators warning lights.

Your system looks great. Could you please post a picture of it ? Thank you very much in advance. I'll try to find it in the Azores / Portugal.

At first I was wondering to order a Datatool Turn Alert indicator warning system.

As far as I know Honda Goldwing and BMW K1200GT use a similar system already.

Best regards,

PS: I hope to post my memorable Austrian Alps trip story and many, many pictures in my website on next week 8)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Hi Pierre

Sure I will try to post a couple of pics in the next few days
though I will be tied up with work for awhile. I have a Data
Tool like you describe, its 3 or 4 years old now and I dont
use it, personally I didnt like the amount of wiring that needed
to be done and the LED set up was not great.In actual use I
found it be a compromise between what "it" wanted and what I
wanted,but all that is a personal thing.

Regards
John G
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hello again John,

I see that we have similar tastes on matter of bikes and accessories. As matter of facts 3 years ago I bought a Datatool Digital Gear Indicator that I never installed for the same reasons of you - too much wiring.

So I won't do the same mistake twice and will wait for your pictures for a final decision.

Thanks again for your help and best regards.

@ Bigwave,

I already changed the two pictures for my own bike ones. Now you can see the "mando de luces en rafagas (flash)" :mrgreen: :

http://pierre.inazores.com/fjr_as_e.htm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
ST1300 Cruise, 6th Gear

I must have been misinformed regarding the cruise control for the Honda ST1300. I apologize for spreading what appears to be erroneuos information.

Those interested in an aftermarket electronic cruise control for their FJR1300AE can find one here:
http://www.motorcycle-cruise-control.com/shop/product.php?productid=85&cat=471&page=1

As for the desire for a 6th gear, I stand by what I said. The point that was made above regarding throttle response is good, and I don't disagree. I just believe that the extra gear would help with fuel mileage over long distances. I realize this is a global forum, and some of you may not find yourselves on exceptionally long stretches of highway. For instance, Spain has a land area of 499,542 sq km (192,874 sq miles - I think). The state of Texas has a land area of 695,621 sq km (268,581 sq miles.) That's just one state in the Union. Alaska is a great deal larger yet. My point is, you can spend an entire day driving across Texas, vast stretches of which will be desolate and lonely. An electronic cruise control would be very nice to have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Thanks for the new photos.
It seems that the downshifting button is a little far away from the hand normal position, is it?
I´m thinking to buy it, but have several doubts that with your opinion are claryfying
Thanks again
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Worst than being a little far away is the fact that the downshifting button is small and quite close to the horn button.

At low speeds or/and city traffic it's not a big deal but, as I mentioned before, in a more sport riding I always use the hand to up shifting and the foot for down shifting. In my opinion is by far the faster and safer solution to ride this new bike.

My AE has 520 km already and I'm absolutely used to it. Yesterday I had to pick-up my old 2003 FJR to deliver it to my Yamaha dealer and, at first, the clutch system even made me some confusion ... :lol:

Besides, the 2006 FJR has a much better braking system, easy handling, better gearbox and increased general comfort, including the larger rear view mirrors and more comfortable saddle. Although I like it, the new suspension is a bit more firm / hard, what's specially nice when riding with a passenger.

Each day I’m most convinced the AE worth the additional 2.000 euros I paid for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Downshift Button

I, too, have inadvertently pressed the horn button when attempting to downshift. This is, however, no where near as bad as ripping through gears 1-4, waiting a moment, then accidentally downshifting back to third. Third gear can handle a mistake, but be careful. These little mental errors are likely to clear up with more riding. Overall, I was comfortable with the finger shifter within a few miles.

I've heard some guys are just using the tab on the upshift side of the paddle to perform downshifts by pressing it forward with their index finger. In other words, push towards you to upshift, push away to downshift. Personally, I have no problem using my thumb to downshift, and I'm sure I will hit the horn less and less.

As for the foot shifter, I used it for the first time today (after 200 miles of riding.) I will test it for downshifting and let you know my impressions. When upshifting with your finger, you can click off very fast shifts (I think the owner's manual or a review I read claimed 60 milliseconds.) When downshifting with your thumb it seems you have to wait half a second before the next downshift. In other words, say you're in 5th, don't like the traffic around you, and want to get out in to the open very quickly. You may want to downshift from 5th to 4th to 3rd by clicking down twice. With the finger shifter you can't simply hit the button twice. You have to hit it once, wait for the gear to engage, then hit again. I'll test the foot shifter and see if the response is similar.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
pierre.lima said:
[*]It is not necessary to decelerate when engaging the sequential speeds, what make the new A/S faster than the previous model, because gear box changes are more rapid, either in acceleration or in speed reductions.
I guess you mean you do not return (ease) the throttle during accelarating and up-shifting? Will this not damage the gearbox?
FJR Owners Manual AEV(C) said:
Always return the throttle to the
closed position while changing
gears to avoid damaging the en-
gine, transmission, and drive
train, which are not designed to
withstand the shock of forced
shifting.
Do you have to close the throttle before shifting? Is this not very difficult to do.
On the normal shift bike you pull the clutch at the same time you close the throttle, shift, and then open the throttle and at the same time engage the clutch again.
How do you do this on the AE? Close the throttle (bike dives), shift, open the throttle (bike lurches again) ???
Any experienced AE riders willing to comment on this?
-Flere
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
AE Shifting

I find that you don't have to roll off the throttle, but the shifts are a little smoother if you do. The owner's manual says to roll off the throttle when shifting. If you don't let off the gas, there is a slight surge when the gear kicks in. This is also dependent on how hard you are accelerating.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
fjr shifting

A very important thing, in red bold letters, is to make sure that the idle is set to 1100 rpm. If it is set lower the electric shifting is clunky and uninspired. I am still undecided after 2600 miles about rolling off the throttle. I think it is enough to just unload the throttle a little, as opposed to rollling off completely, to do upshifts.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top