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2012 FJR Blue Beauty, 2014 FJR Redhead, +++
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Preparing my 2012 FJR Blue Beauty for sale shortly, I took off the lowering links and MCE Canyon Cages to reuse on my 2014 Redhead. With these gone and having a short inseam, I felt very vulnerable about dropping the bike - especially when I rolled it out of the garage for photos and my feet could not touch as the wheels straddled the street gutter.

Got the bike safely put away again, and pondering the situation I realized that the bike is a lot easier to maneuver if I take the seat off first. Probably too obvious for others to mention, but for me it was a good moment!:)
 

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For low speed maneuvering around the garage or parking places... why straddle and tip toe while on top of the bike?
Practice moving the bike around standing next to it and grabbing handlebars (when going forward) or back seat grab bar (going backward) remembering to keep upright at all times.
A lot faster and much safer.
Cheers,
Daniel
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Yes, Daniel, standing by the bike often works too. Since I am 80 and short, my arm length and upper body strength may not be up to the task of keeping the bike perfectly upright and getting enough leverage to push also. Especially backing down my sloping drive, I feel I have better control if my legs are providing stability and my hands are focusing on braking and clutching.

Excited about the possibilities of the 2022-23 one liter sports touring bikes being more manageable for us smaller riders, without giving up too much in the way of touring comfort. Would be glad to give up 35 HP if I can also give up 70+ pounds of top-heaviness :) (y) :)
 

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I am fortunate to have long legs and always prefer to sit on the bike to move it. Pushing it has lots of dangers due to the weight of the bike. I would suggest that where ever possible you start it to manoevre it.
 

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FJR1300A 2008
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I felt very vulnerable about dropping the bike - especially when I rolled it out of the garage for photos and my feet could not touch as the wheels straddled the street gutter.
TooManyBikes,

At the risk of being obvious, humans do have limits, and aging does not help, on that issue.

Trying to do things which are at the margins of your abilities cannot be a good plan now. I would really recommend getting assistance (assistantS) when you need help with anything heavy, and especially if it has wheels. Nobody, here or there, wants to see the bike get dropped and damaged. Please contact your local church, neighbors, social clubs (Elks, American Legion et c.), and even the police or firefighters to help you to find the help you want (need). I know that can be a tough call, but the alternatives can be worse. Best wishes.
 

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TMB your post has given me hope. You are 80 and I am almost 66 plus I am a 5ft 9in 250 pound fat guy. The FJR is still working for me but when I get on my ZRX or ZX14 they feel so light and easy to ride that I sometimes do not want to get back on the FJR. The FJR has to many comfort features for me to give up but when it gets that time I may wind up on a Can-Am.
I hope to make it to where you are at 👍
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
ReRose Thanks for your kind words. Understand how your sports bikes must feel like agile Formula 1 cars after a day touring on the FJR - which is not very shabby in its own right. Most of my riding is multi-day trips that mix interstate (about the only way out of LA) and byways when I reach the mountains. Have often sought an alternative to the FJR , but the smaller bikes seem to lack many of the features that set sport touring bikes apart. The best I found was the BMW F800GT with 89 HP to push 470 pounds and the Honda CBF1000 with 97 HP for 490/550 pounds (not-avail in the US :mad:

Let's hope the coming one liter S/T bikes are a long sought solution for continued riding with ease and a measure of adrenaline as we start to age.
 

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2007 FJR1300A
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Find yourself an fz1. Put a taller windshield and some bags on it. Sport touring, 450 or so lbs and 140-150 HP depending on year.
 

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Too bad none of the lighter ST alternates have shaft drive (like the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT--485 lbs. wet w/o the side cases and 115 HP)--I really don't want to mess with chain maintenance on a 4K-5K mile trip.
 

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2007 FJR1300A
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1,259 Posts
Too bad none of the lighter ST alternates have shaft drive (like the Yamaha Tracer 9 GT--485 lbs. wet w/o the side cases and 115 HP)--I really don't want to mess with chain maintenance on a 4K-5K mile trip.
Then don't ;) Some of us just let our modern o-ring chains alone and they work just fine. If you are one that insists that an o-ring chain be coated in oil, install an oiler.
 

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R1200RS. Lighter, lower CG, shaft drive.
I rode a R1200RS on an Alps tour with Edelweiss in 2015. I didn't like the riding position, the handling, or the boxer motor. Also weighs 50 lbs. more than the Tracer.
 
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