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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I take my wheels to the local dealer for tire replacements etc...their prices are surprisingly good on loose tire replacements and seem to be normal for other work. I got a quote for doing my rear linkage service, and it was about $280. I know my bike is a 15 with "only" 27k on it, but as some of you saw, I rode through Tropical Storm Ida:LOL:. I noticed the other day that when I sat on the bike before a ride, the rear sounded a little "creaky". It rides completely fine, but I don't want to damage anything by ignoring what I heard. I used some teflon spray that I use on pianos in all the spots i could see down there for a temporary fix....but it's not a substitute for grease which I suspect might be lacking due to my extended storm run. No worries on the teflon lube, its not a penetrating agent like WD or PB Breaker...its just dry lube....but it wont last through the elements i'm sure. The Linkage service looks like a pain in the d**k for lack of a better phrase. Is it worth paying someone $280? I have a the center stand, and I have a track stand for the front...as well as a wooden block that can fit under the headers...but thats all for jacks.
 

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2007 FJR1300A
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1,259 Posts
It's on my list for this winter when the snow comes and I can only polish the bikes. I hate paying people to work on toys, aside from the money is the hassle factor of bringing them in to a shop.
 

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To fully service the linkage you have to remove the
center stand. You will need to 鈥渉ang鈥 the bike.
If this isn鈥檛 practical for you then pay someone to
do it. The service isn鈥檛 difficult but it is somewhat
involved.
 

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FJR1300A 2008
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2013 Yamaha FJR 1300
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49 Posts
For the amount of money they are asking, for the amount of work they'll be doing, that's a great price! Just depends on whether you like wrenching yourself.
 

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I grease the linkage every time I change the tyres, except the one that is difficult to get at. With the bike on the side stand slightly loosen the nuts that you can get at. Then put on centre stand, remove the rear wheel. With the wheel off undo the nuts and remove bolts and sleves and rest the end of the swing arm on a padded axle stand ( you don't want to scratch it !).
With the 3 bolts removed swing the housing on the remaining bearing that is difficult to get at. You will find that it swings freely and does not need greasing. It is protected from muck by the swing arm. The bearing that causes all the problems is the one on the bottom of the shock absorber that can sieze up by 20000 miles. It is possible to replace this bearing without removing the housing with sockets and a large G cramp.
It does not matter how much grease you put on these bearings as when you put it all back together most of the grease is pushed off, but what is on it will last a long time if it does not get any muck or water into it and the one on the swing arm stays very clean.
 

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2007 FJR1300A
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Having not done this yet - is there room to install a greasable bolt in all locations?
Something like this that we commonly use in jeep suspensions
Automotive tire Cylinder Auto part Font Technology
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I probably wouldn鈥檛 even have to do this on my model year, had I not rode in so much rain.
 

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FJR1300 A, TMax 530 DX, Tracer GT900, XS850
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Agree with Linton, the hard one to get at (front, upper) is the most protected and least likely to suffer corrosion. I regularly remove the bolts and clean the seal lips/grease the bearings and sleeve on the relay (dog bones linkages and bottom of shock) and then the swing arm dog bone linkage bearings. These are the most exposed and easy to do with the bike on the centrestand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I grease the linkage every time I change the tyres, except the one that is difficult to get at. With the bike on the side stand slightly loosen the nuts that you can get at. Then put on centre stand, remove the rear wheel. With the wheel off undo the nuts and remove bolts and sleves and rest the end of the swing arm on a padded axle stand ( you don't want to scratch it !).
With the 3 bolts removed swing the housing on the remaining bearing that is difficult to get at. You will find that it swings freely and does not need greasing. It is protected from muck by the swing arm. The bearing that causes all the problems is the one on the bottom of the shock absorber that can sieze up by 20000 miles. It is possible to replace this bearing without removing the housing with sockets and a large G cramp.
It does not matter how much grease you put on these bearings as when you put it all back together most of the grease is pushed off, but what is on it will last a long time if it does not get any muck or water into it and the one on the swing arm stays very clean.
Looks like a beer and a doobie job i might attempt. I just don鈥檛 want to deal with that problem bolt right now..lol.
 

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2007A, 2013A
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I did this twice on my '07. After riding in at least 2 hurricanes and several more tropical storms and much southeastern summer rain I found that by using top quality marine grade wheel bearing grease (like for boat trailers) this is a one-N-done job. The second time was a waste of time. Don't over think it.
 

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Those swingarm and linkage bearings are my LEAST favorite. Or let's just say I HATE THEM!

My suspension guy charges about that and I consider it to be worth every penny. Removing those thin races are a real pain and he has all the perfect tools to do it without boogering stuff.

I don't think I'd use the greasable pivot bolts though. The factories don't, so I probably wouldn't.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
He mentioned i could save a little money if i bundled it with the front steering service too, but I鈥檓 reluctant to do that because the front has given me no trouble. It鈥檚 got the MCL triple up there so at some point when that was done I鈥檓 sure the guy tightened the stem and bearings setup鈥oes anybody know if tapered bearings came with MCL triple or was it by itself. I don鈥檛 know how long steering bearings last on a third Gen fjr馃し馃徎鈥嶁檪锔
 

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2007 FJR1300A
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1,259 Posts
Those swingarm and linkage bearings are my LEAST favorite. Or let's just say I HATE THEM!

My suspension guy charges about that and I consider it to be worth every penny. Removing those thin races are a real pain and he has all the perfect tools to do it without boogering stuff.

I don't think I'd use the greasable pivot bolts though. The factories don't, so I probably wouldn't.
The factories don't use them on jeeps either. It would cost an extra $2. Factories also don't install greasable ball joints or tierod ends any more ;)
 

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Versys 1000 CBF1000 VFR800
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TWO on YouTube posted this excellent video on it:

The video might help you decide.


Having done it, hell yeah! That鈥檚 a steel IMO.

Best of luck!
It's not an excellent video..... a member here followed it and broke his seat latch bracket... don't lift from there!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
No, tapered bearings do not come with the MCL riser.
Whats the average time before gen III folks usually have steering bearing issues...or do they?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
It's not an excellent video..... a member here followed it and broke his seat latch bracket... don't lift from there!!!
I find his videos a little tedious personally, although many are informative. Was he ever on this board?
 
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