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This is going to sound idiotic (hopefully no hate mail coming my direction).... However, if all other possible simple solutions don't work, I'd try squirting a few very short squirts of Tri Flow lubricant (not WD-40) down into the ignition switch (where the key is inserted). Then work the key in and out a few times and turn the key back and forth a few times. I'm told by a very reputable locksmith that Tri Flow will not harm the ignition switch in any way. Again, it will sound idiotic to some folks but **** it's worth a try. This technique worked on two of my older, gen 1 FZ1 bikes in the past when they would stall for no apparent reason on occasion after shutting off the bike then and restarting it.
 

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Hi all,

I just joined this site, so hope someone can advise me please...

I have a 2006 FJR1300 with about 50K on the clock. I have been laid off work since the 24th of December, but have been starting and running this bike regularly and making sure that neither of my machines sit idle for weeks on end.
However.. yesterday, I popped the key in the ignition, turned it and nothing. No ignition lights, pump noises.. nothing.. other than side and tail lights and indicators working. No horn.
It's a bit weird that this should happen without hardly any use, although the cold snap we are having is a bit suspect.

I have put the bike on charge all day today to be sure it's not the battery, but before I start exploring further with limited mechanical knowledge, I just wanted to see if anyone has seen this before and might it be a simple thing (relatively) like a fuse - or even the main fuse? - I'm not sure the lights would work if it was the main fuse...

Any advice would be greatly appreciated

Regards,
Alex
Welcome! This is the best place to be for all things FJR,,,

Check you VIN.
My '06 had a recall on instrument cluster and wiring harness around Aug that year I think.
I did not have your symptoms; it would die at stops on occasion but start right back up.....just love electronics don't we,

Best of luck diagnosing....
 

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Plus 1 above.

I re-call the wiring harness was zip tied too tight and pulled a wire loose from the ignition switch over time. Same symptoms.

Might be the same but soldiered wire joint inside the switch came loose (probably from being too tight)...

Ignition switch replacement was the fix. There were issues about having a different key for the ignition than the rest of the bike. Again, as I re-call, Yamaha eventually came up with something with getting the bikes key to work the new switch..

A quick search found it: https://motorcycleviews.com/recalls/rec09v002000.htm

.
 

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I would add even though it has nothing todo with Rebels problem, but anytime I pull any electronics apart I have a tube of dielectric grease handy to put on all connectors for reassembly. It helps keep the connectors clean & dry, my .02
 

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No idea what a Spider is! I have looked at this online, but don't think I am technically minded enough to know what to look for/do about it... hoping its not... I did have a lot of electrical work done in September, as I had a host of issues that I think are common to the spider issue (indicator light etc staying on, nothing working) - but I had this resoundingly addressed and pretty much every connector/block changed for new as well, so fingers crossed.
rebeldogg, a couple of notes about the FJR electrical system that are "common" knowledge:
1. When the battery charge gets too low, strange things happen. Besides the bike not starting, panel lights may not work, and the clock may lose time. Our advice is always to check, charge, or replace the battery before doing anything else.
2. Spiders, actually "ground spiders", or technically, return spiders: Unlike many vehicles, MamaYama doesn't depend on the the frame for an electrical return to the battery for anything except the starter motor. All of the rest of the electrical bits have return lines grouped together back to the battery.

Yamaha groups the FJR into three (some say 3.5 or 4) series, depending on year of production. The obvious difference is bodywork. Less obvious differences include the ABS system and the electrical system. Because of the way the returns (I am an old, retired radar tech; I differentiate between grounds and returns) are grouped together, Series II bikes (2006 - 2012) are particularly susceptible to this problem.

Back on Page 1, rbentnail has an excellent, firsthand writeup of the problem.

The advice to get an inexpensive multimeter for automotive work is good. A safety warning: don't depend on a $10 (or equivalent) cheapy meter for household work. You should have what is called a Cat III or Car IV meter for that.
 

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I had this problem with my 2006 FJR. It developed over time and turned out to be burnt terminals in the ignition switch. From memory the the switch
has a plastic square inside that only uses two of four contacts. I rotated it 90 degrees and reassembled it. When it actually failed it had been fine for a year since it last played up and then one morning it just wouldn't start.
 

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Dielectric-don't do it !

I would add even though it has nothing todo with Rebels problem, but anytime I pull any electronics apart I have a tube of dielectric grease handy to put on all connectors for reassembly. It helps keep the connectors clean & dry, my .02
Electronics tech by trade. Dielectric by definition is "INSTALATOR" or "to reduce flow of electricity". Used Directly on the wire connections will cause problems in the long run. Ya, you'll keep corrosion and water out but also reduce electrical flow. Dielectric grease is made for applying to insulating rubber. Like old car distributor caps. I have see connectors overheat from people using dielectric grease thinking the same as the quote. Voltage goes down but amps go up to equal the needed watts...ohms law. Amps are heat...that's fuses & breakers are rated in amps = heat...
 

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Electronics tech by trade. Dielectric by definition is "INSTALATOR" or "to reduce flow of electricity". Used Directly on the wire connections will cause problems in the long run. Ya, you'll keep corrosion and water out but also reduce electrical flow. Dielectric grease is made for applying to insulating rubber. Like old car distributor caps. I have see connectors overheat from people using dielectric grease thinking the same as the quote. Voltage goes down but amps go up to equal the needed watts...ohms law.
Industrial Electrician by trade. Absolutely true. But in low power systems like our bikes, the use of dielectric grease in connectors has proven for at least 40 yrs that there are no harmful effects when used sparingly to keep moisture and weather out. The old adage that "a little dab'll do ya" rings true in this case. Many of us have promoted the use of electrically conductive corrosion inhibiting products like Noalox where appropriate for a very long time.
 

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This is going to sound idiotic (hopefully no hate mail coming my direction).... However, if all other possible simple solutions don't work, I'd try squirting a few very short squirts of Tri Flow lubricant (not WD-40) down into the ignition switch (where the key is inserted). ................
Does Tri Flow exhibit the same characteristics as ACF-50 in regards to penetrating corrosion and stopping it?
 
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