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I'm 70 years young and am considering the purchase of a '21 FJR1300ES. Is this crazy? Delayed middle-age male menopause? I've owned several Harleys, a BMW, a Honda and a couple of Yamahas in my 50 years of motorcycling. Would love to hear from others in their golden years who have FJs to be the perfect bike....
 

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Jr, I’m almost 67 and have a 14a that I bought new. The good things are it handles very well, the brakes are pretty incredible, the power is sometimes a bit frightening. It’s just an effortless, smooth piece.

The bad: the oe seat is absolute garbage imho but everyone’s different there, some find these seat fine ��,,the bike is not only heavy but top heavy, dropping it is not an uncommon occurrence. The fjr has a vibration zone 3500-4500rpm, but differs bike to bike and a throttle body sync & mileage seems to improve this a bunch. On the newer 6 spd bikes that zone is in illegal speed zones. The fjr is hard on tires, usually wearing the front out long before the rear, depends a lot on your right hand.

The most Common mods made are a new seat (I have a Seth Laam) there are a number available with no real consensus of which is best. Windshield, the Yamaha Touring windshield is a good compromise and is liked by most, it’s what I have but again there is a lot of choice’s.
Bar risers or set backs are a common update, heli-bars are probably the most common I have MV-Motorad, again there are a lot of choices.

One of the best piece’s of advice given by several here is on a new purchase just ride it a while and you’ll figure out what you want to make it yours. Good luck & welcome.
 

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I bought my FJR at 68 and will be 71 in a couple of months. The FJR is great motorcycle.

My personal recommendation is to evaluate your needs and be honest and realistic with yourself, including your personal fitness, strengths and weaknesses. If you are going to be doing a bunch of inter-state travel the FJR will do a bang up job. It's powerful, it's fast, reliable, has good storage and wind protection, has good range, a shaft drive and it's efficient for that kind of job. But it is large, tall, heavy, top heavy, and expensive to buy new. If you are just going to be riding around locally with maybe a foray into a neighboring state, there are a myriad of motorcycles 750 cc and up that will do that job that are lighter, cost less, wear out tires less, get better gas mileage etc that are no less reliable V-Stom 650, Versys 650, NC 750X, 1000 Ninja, 750 and 1000 Suzuki's just to name a few, plus some of the exotic Euro's, but you will have to put up with chain drive.. although that is not the chore it used to be 30 years ago. Oh Yea and Honda is bringing out an Africa Twin powered sport tourer next year rumors have it.

At our age people are usually looking for something a little lighter, and as I am traveling less now that my wife quit riding last year, I too am thinking about something lighter. Maybe a 2021 NC750X. It's not that I can't handle the FJR anymore, it's just for me it's like using a maul to hammer a tack. Don't get me wrong, I enjoy the FJR every time I ride it (rode 350 days and 21,000 miles last year), it's just that it is a bit of overkill for the job I have at hand for a motorcycle these days. Plenty of riders do tour on smaller bikes (just something I'm not used to since I have been riding liter bikes plus since 1977)

FJR....Great motorcycle.. just make sure you NEED or REALLY WANT, that much motorcycle.
 

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I'm 70 years young and am considering the purchase of a '21 FJR1300ES. Is this crazy? Delayed middle-age male menopause? I've owned several Harleys, a BMW, a Honda and a couple of Yamahas in my 50 years of motorcycling. Would love to hear from others in their golden years who have FJs to be the perfect bike....
jrporter,

The FJR is top-heavy, so you will want to flat-foot it at stops. To that end, the seat can be lowered or made narrow/thinner. The suspension can be lowered, if necessary, for little money. Keep the FJR very vertical when stopped, because once it tips a bit too far, no rider can stop the drop. Fall bars and frame sliders will cost far less than one zero-speed drop. (Insurance may or may not cover that expense.) Handlebar vibrations can be minimized, or nothing, with maintenance and/or certain farkles. I recommend half a tank of gas or less, until you get a firm handle on the weight issue.

That said, the acceleration is shocking. Brakes to match. With correct tire inflation, handling is almost by thought control, not falling into turns or trying to stand up on you in a turn. The newer FJRs have Sport/Touring throttle responses, select as needed. I'm your age, with a 2008, and for all the bikes I have owned, there is nothing else even close. I'd expect a new FJR to be even better.

The strong and heavy FJR deserves good tires. FJR tires are not the place to pinch pennies, IMHO. I also consider a Tire Pressure Monitoring System to be required, not optional gear. Even the valve-cap TPMS versions do the job very nicely. Yamaha has an extended warrantee plan (Y.E.S.) which costs maybe US$400.00 and it will pay for itself in a day if you ever have a problem. All Yamaha dealers will honor that warrantee. You do not need to buy the Y.E.S. plan where you buy the bike, if your dealer wants too much for it.

HTH.
.
 

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68, recovering from cancer and still riding and loving my FJR. Bought new in 09 and while just like most I'm always considering what I would get in it's place but once I get on and ride I love it again. As others have already said there is much to consider if you go new, live with it for awhile to know what if anything needs to be changed to make it your own. If you go used, you may find a well farkled machine that needs little or nothing. These are excellent machines with exceptional performance though they do have their own peculiarities but overall IMHO a fantastic machine. As always YMMV. :wink2:
 

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To jrporter: Everything these young whippersnappers relayed to you is spot-on. The FJR is all of those things and more. I'm only 77 and find my '13 Feejer to be a light-weight compared to my Road Glide and pretty squatty sitting in the garage next to my GSA. I find the weight to be low down, compared to a Harley, and 200 pounds less has got to make a difference. I get on whichever bike inspires me when I walk out to ride. Only you can know what your limitations are, but don't tie yourself down just because of your age. Just my $0.02...
 

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I am 71 now and my 2014A FJR has gotten heavy over the years. So I solved that. If on a certain day I find it too heavy I go ride one of my lighter bikes. You need more than one bike.
 

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I will be 75 in August. Bought my 2013 in 2014 just after I retired - well, retired from a paying job. Three months later, I left on a 2700 mile trip.

Mods: Get the bike and do a couple of short trips, say, 300 - 500 miles. (On an FJR, 300 miles is a short trip.) Fix what bothered you the most. Repeat three or four times. By then, you should have the bike pretty well dialed in.

I have the three "standard" mods: handlebar risers (MCL, now defunct, installed by previous owner), larger windshield, and a better, though not custom, seat. Also aux electrical bus (Fuzebox), extra LED lighting, front and rear, internal USB power for GPS and SPOT, and a few other odds 'n ends. I may install front and rear "dash" cams. Haven't decided yet.

My favorite safety mod: 3M reflective film on saddlebags:
https://blackhillsmoto.com/collections/reflective-decals/products/yamaha-fjr1300-rear-bag-decals
Inexpensive, the plain black ones are almost invisible in the daytime, unmistakable at night. If you do a lot of night riding you need these.

That said, the acceleration is shocking. Brakes to match. With correct tire inflation, handling is almost by thought control, not falling into turns or trying to stand up on you in a turn. The newer FJRs have Sport/Touring throttle responses, select as needed. I'm your age, with a 2008, and for all the bikes I have owned, there is nothing else even close. I'd expect a new FJR to be even better.
And all on regular gas. I spend a fair amount of time Out West (no, Texas is not "West" enough) and the FJR runs quite happily on the 85 octane gas you find out there.
 

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At 65 I’m just a baby in this bunch but I’ll chime in anyway. First thing you need to consider is your inseam. The shorter your inseam the heavier and more top heavy the FJR is going to feel. I mention this because inseam is almost never an issue on a HD. I have a 30” inseam and never had a problem with the FJR. It’s been called top heavy but doesn’t seem excessively so to me. Try a Super Adventure or GSA or even a Super Tenere with a full tank for comparison. All that said the FJR is a bit of a porker. It’s better than great on the interstate and doesn't give up much on the back roads. When I was pounding out the miles on the slab there wasn’t a bike I’d rather be on. Now my riding is more mixed I try to spend as much time on secondary roads and state highways as the interstate and I found I wanted a lighter bike. Not that the FJR can’t do it but like the Ferret said no point using a mall for driving tacks and lighter doesn’t mean your giving up much on the slab. I found a lighter bike is more fun and responsive in the twisties while the FJRs weight works against it on less than ideal pavement. I love the FJR think it’s a great bike but as the saying goes, horses for courses you need to run the right horse on the right course.
 

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Jr, one thing to add, like Donk and many others above I have a 30” inseam which really wasn’t a problem with the stock seat, I could pretty much flat foot it, but when I initially added the Yamaha touring seat and then the Laam seat I could no longer flat foot it and had a tip over at a light when my foot/toes slipped out from under me, luckily no real damage.

So I ended up adding some Soupy’s adjustable links in the back and just slid the forks up in the triple clamps to match, I lowered the bike 1/2” overall and can now flatfoot it again, much better for me, not comfy with being on my toes.

Also the fjr has great range with 6.6 gal of fuel and easily out paces my bladder, in my stable of bikes it holds the most gas and easily gets the best economy with a judicious use of the right hand. Just an effortless ride so long as you are aware of the weight & manage it. Let us know how it goes.
 

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Get one of these: 5 speed so no tranny problems, cruise, ES, seat and windshield of choice and you are good to go. And the red ones are the fastest so you can leave the other FJR's looking at your tailight. LED headlights if you want. Just replace the bulbs and its not hard to do. You will find the FJR to be the easiest bike on the planet to do oil and filter changes. Air filter is a snap also.

And a +1 on the reflective decals for saddlebags and sides if you please.
 

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Not sure if there is just one “perfect bike” that excels in every area, but I’m 70 now, and I find that my ‘20 FJR is a great balance of comfort and performance.
 

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i feel like a kid at age 60, just bought an ex cop bike here in sunny Melbourne, tis a 2014 model, I had a k1200LT and a ninjasx1000, ninja great light n quick, bmw heavy comfy and great tourer, thought the fjr fits the in between bill. Got fooled into thinking it's narrow as stated on all documentation, it's supposed to be 750mm narrow [lies!] well, maybe the handlebars might be but not fairing and mirrors.
Anyhoo, weight wise, as all bikes, slow and standing still you do feel it, and I miss the reverse that the K1200LT has, fjr I find is comfy enough I dont do long miles though, fuel capacity is ok, compared to the ninja and bmw I'd say comparable. comfy stuff that bmw had isnt with the fjr but the fjr sheds about 90kgs off from the bmw yet 60 kgs heavier than the ninja.
as alll the above, horses for courses, I'm still learning the fjr and so far so good :)
 

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I feel like the baby on this thread, at 56. Got my '17 ES last year and gobbling miles faster than any previous ride. Weeks back dropped my bike out of sheer absent-mindedness (bad camber on a hill and tried an ill-fated U-turn at 1 mph). There's your top-heavy issue right there -- just manage the situation as best you can and you generally are okay. I'm 6'2" and can flat-foot, but the issue is always with low speeds in turns with awkward road angles OR gravel/uneven road surfaces. Other than that, the FJR is an absolute dream. If you love riding, I can't see how you don't grow fond of an FJR -- so capable at so many things. Hope this helps!
 
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Does anyone on this forum own a 2015 FJR? Which muffler should I install on this bike? Where can I purchase accessories for this bike aside from 4wheelonline? Your insights will be highly appreciated.
 

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I think you nailed it. I would recommend crash bars and a top box also for your stuff
I do have canyon cages and a homemade topbox made from the combination of a Touratech luggage rack and the larger HF Apache case, but I do not regard either as the "standard" mods that nearly everybody has. I also added highway pegs to the cages.

Myth, what accessories are you looking for?
 
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