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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I just finished up some upgrades and figured I'd do a little write up/review in case it might help someone out.

I have a 2010 FJR and couldn't stand the condition of the front forks. They were waay too soft. So I decided swap out the stock springs and put in some race tech springs as well as some 5w race tech fork oil. I needed to change out a fork seal anyways so I finally got to town a couple weekends ago.

Holy crap, the oil that was in there, I'm convinced, hadn't been changed in a long ass time.
The kit I purchased from race tech did not include any spacers although I later found out that it required some. A technician from race tech was kind enough to sell me some and help me determine the length of spacer I needed. Unfortunately, I had to go back and do the math again as the numbers the technician provided were not accurate. I ended up using pvc for spacer material and it works just fine.

After giving the internals a really proper cleaning and adding some clean oil, I capped the forks off and re-installed them on the bike. Wow, what a difference! It's a whole new bike now, at least when it comes to the front end. I made a previous post about installing some new EBC rotors and now my front end is pretty dang perfect, almost as confident as my track bike.

If anyone is on the fence about getting their forks re worked, i highly recommend a different spring and obviously some fresh oil.

Anyways, there's my 2 cents.

Hope everyone had a great holiday weekend 馃憤
 

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2020 FJR1300ES
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That's a smart upgrade for sure.
 

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2016 FJR1300AK
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Never understood why a suspension company would sell you springs but not tell you that it needed spacers. I've read that Racetech does this alot and they make you cut your own spacers to length. That's bad and not something a good shop would have you do.
I buy all my suspension stuff from Traxxion and they're spacers are pre-cut and are so precisely cut that it takes any of the guesswork out.
But yes, stiffer springs (hopefully you got some 1.10 rate) really do help the FJR quite a bit.
 
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Versys 1000, VFR800
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Traxxion is likely the only ones that sell precut spacers.... with the RaceTech's, you re-use your existing ones, just cut them shorter. Not that hard to calculate.... you can re-use your existing spacers with most spring kits providing the new springs are at least as long as your old springs.... most are longer/more coils = better.
 

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Traxxion is likely the only ones that sell precut spacers.... with the RaceTech's, you re-use your existing ones, just cut them shorter. Not that hard to calculate.... you can re-use your existing spacers with most spring kits providing the new springs are at least as long as your old springs.... most are longer/more coils = better.
Back in the day Yamaha used a fish based fork oil. Changing your fork oil is one of the most overlooked maintenance checks, nice job.
 

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2007 FJR1300A
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Traxxion is likely the only ones that sell precut spacers.... with the RaceTech's, you re-use your existing ones, just cut them shorter. Not that hard to calculate.... you can re-use your existing spacers with most spring kits providing the new springs are at least as long as your old springs.... most are longer/more coils = better.
Sonic sends some material to cut your own as well, but on the bike I put them in the stock spacers were the correct length. I do like the traxxion best, since they are ready to go and there is no measuring or cutting. Have them in both of my current bikes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You need special tools or just pvc and rubber mallet?
I ended up purchasing a couple of race techs tools just to make the job a little easier and because I work on the forks for my track bike and my friends bikes. The seal slide hammer thingy is a must. I also got the rod fork holder which is a really nice thing to have handy. There are a few different syringe tools for measuring fork oil, they all do the same job in my eyes but the race tech one I gotta admit is pretty dang slick and I recommend it. Other than that it's just normal tools, there's a allen (8mm?) at the bottom and then a couple of box or sockets needed up top.

Yeah. I was a bit frustrated when I got all my parts and then noticed I'd need some spacers and race tech didn't mention anything about it. The person I spoke to at race tech was nice enough but I still had to pay for the spacer material, to which going off of their numbers was the wrong length spacer 馃槄. So i had to take it all out and recut some new pvc spacers. It was a bit of a pain but oh well, live and learn I guess.

I'm a pretty small framed guy, I only weigh about 160 so the springs I got were the .90. Still, leaps and bounds better than stock.

I would recommend replacing the bushings if you end up doing this job. There is an inner and outer that race tech offers but there is a third bushing that Yamaha sells. I've attached a photo of it so you can see.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Don't pay any attention to the spacer numbers I wrote down in the book. Those are the wrong dimensions
 

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In conventional forks, fork oil gets contaminated by superfine particles of aluminum as the lower bushing slides up and down inside the lower all alluminum fork tube. Over time, this accumulates as a fine slurry/sludge in the bottom of the forks and can clog up compression and rebound damping valving.... complete disassembly is best and a good rinse with a solvent.
I buy OEM bushings, they're usually cheaper than any from the suspension suppliers....
Any RaceTech springs I've put in FJR's simply required shortening the original spacer by 32mm. You certainly can cut your own from 1" dia. PVC pipe. The idea being any springs should have ~15mm of preload when installed, i.e., with the preload adjuster backed out, it should take you a little effort to get the top fork cap back on. RaceTech's instructions tell you how to calculate spacer length, and you can use this for any springs. If you really want to keep this simple as a rough guide, measure the OEM springs and the new springs, and cut the existing spacer after measuring the difference in spring length. Need some extra preload, just add some washers, RaceTech provides a generous supply of extras with their springs.
 
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