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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It'll be decision time after March 06 in Australia when the 2006 models are available. There are a lot of for and against points that I guess will only be settled after some time on the bikes.

Trawling through the specs, I've come up with an assessment tool that is useful for comparing straight line performance.
- convert torque, power and dry bike mass to your preferred units
- since the bike is only part of the team a realistic standard load figure of fully outfitted rider with fuel etc is added to the dry bike mass (On road mass)
- unless you are dealing with very exotic bikes the onroad mass (kgs) will be greater than power (kw) or torque (kg m). To get the most easily interpreted comparision I simply divide the total onroad mass by the power or torque.

For my carcase plus gear fuel etc I've added 110kg to the stated dry bike weight and used the claimed crank engine output figures.

R1---------------2.2 kg/kw----------------25.96 kg/kg m
FZ1--------------2.79----------------------28.52
FJR--------------3.55----------------------27.3

The torque comparision suggests to me that the FJR may outperform the FZ1 in accelleration until the topend power of the FZ1 is reached - not what I expected given the approx 60kg dry weight difference. The FJR is still an attractive mix. This comparision approach is useful to assess a bike's suitability to your individual requirements and loading. There are some interesting comparisions that emerge when you do the numbers on a range of current bikes. Dry bike weight is significant but the total on road figure with rider is the important factor along with the torque / power balance. Do the math.

Cheers
Lenz
 

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:?:

So, a matematical professor are we?

Haven't you forgotten about something??
(Amittingly a very minor detail)






HOW DOES IT RIDE???

Do you require a pure bred sport bike to outperform your mates? (fastest to the grave and all that)

Or, do you require a machine that can take you across a continent comfortably (fully loaded with camping equipment and pillion) and still leave you with the feeling that it were an enjoyable day so let's do it all again tomorrow? (and still keeping up with your mates)

Well, all to their own and so on.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The Viking said:
:?: Haven't you forgotten about something??
(Amittingly a very minor detail)
HOW DOES IT RIDE???
I thought I mentioned that the decision would "only be settled after some time on the bikes" - the impression the bike makes on the first test ride is absolutely important. Just to give an example of comparision between Triumph 1050cc Speed Triple and the Morini 1200cc Corsaro etc:

Triumph S3----------3.13 kg/kw-----------------27.92 kg/kg m
Morini Corsaro------3.0---------------------------24.8
Hayabusa-----------2.54-------------------------23.2
K1200S--------------2.74-------------------------25.3
FJR--------------------3.55-------------------------27.3
Ducati S4RS---------3.0---------------------------27.08

For me these comparisions are just part of the process of separating the possibles and probables. The FJR has always been something of a surprise to many sports bike riders - just by using some very basic math you can see what will accelerate (kg/kg m) for a meaningful load @ 110kg plus bike dry weight and if there is much comparative topend power (kg/kw) . Just a bit of mindless number crunching really - there was no intention to intimidate anyone with the math.

Cheers
Lenz
 

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Interesting, I think you would be better served to get the magazine review weights for the bike, the manufacturer's are usually very optimistic, especially for sport bikes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Profireguy said:
Interesting, I think you would be better served to get the magazine review weights for the bike, the manufacturer's are usually very optimistic, especially for sport bikes.
The possible 5 - 10 kg error margin between claimed dry bike weight and "ready to go without rider" weight becomes less important when you add the weight of the road-ready pilot (and pillion maybe). The ratios I mentioned earlier are intended as a guide only and become meaningful only when the total combined road ready mass is known ie what is your specific usage / load. Accurate road-ready bike masses are definitely better but it's not always possible to hunt them down. There are certainly inaccuracies in the ratios and there is no attempt made to further complicate the issue with aerodynamic losses, etc etc.

Cheers
Lenz
 
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