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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We’ll, it’s time for v2.0 of my epic eastern tour! It’s 4 weeks beforehand, and i plan to really stick to the “Do nothing more to the bike for 2 weeks before a trip rule”😆. I’ve got a new rear tire already in the garage and even though my Angel GT front has 2.5mm left on the treads (of the 3.5 when new), I’m likely gonna swap it for a new one and finish it off later. I’m gonna do the oil/filter for sure…maybe clean the air filter if needed, and do the diff oil just to be nice. If brakes are needed I’ll do them too. My question is, should i bother with trying to grease the u-joint, if I’ve never attempted that before, while I’m dealing with the rear end, or could things potentially go awry with that job? Same with brake fluids, which I’ve never done the FULL way. I’m going to wait till after to check valves for sure…around 40k. It’s been running amazing.
 
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There are 4 acorn nuts (and washers) holding the rear drive on, after you have the rear wheel off. If you do a part job, you can grease the driveshaft spline and reasssemble, pretty easy (hint, have the bike in gear so the u-joint won't rotate). If you do a whole job, you take some extra steps to remove the u-joint and grease the spline that goes to the middle gear..... torque on the acorn nuts is 30 ft. lbs, you can reduce that somewhat if you use loctite if you can't get in there with a torque wrench.
 
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We’ll, it’s time for v2.0 of my epic eastern tour! It’s 4 weeks beforehand, and i plan to really stick to the “Do nothing more to the bike for 2 weeks before a trip rule”😆. I’ve got a new rear tire already in the garage and even though my Angel GT front has 2.5mm left on the treads (of the 3.5 when new), I’m likely gonna swap it for a new one and finish it off later. I’m gonna do the oil/filter for sure…maybe clean the air filter if needed, and do the diff oil just to be nice. If brakes are needed I’ll do them too. My question is, should i bother with trying to grease the u-joint, if I’ve never attempted that before, while I’m dealing with the rear end, or could things potentially go awry with that job? Same with brake fluids, which I’ve never done the FULL way. I’m going to wait till after to check valves for sure…around 40k. It’s been running amazing.
I just did my entire drive including the U-joint, rear swing arm pivots and diff fluid for the first time following Mark Johnson's site. It was very straightforward and easy if you are into the work, don't be afraid of it. Lot's of cardboard, q-tips, bluecloths and WD-40 and you are good to go.
 

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Be sure to note-- the drive shaft clean-n-lube and the U-joint clean-n-lube are listed as 2 different procedures at MJ's site.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Be sure to note-- the drive shaft clean-n-lube and the U-joint clean-n-lube are listed as 2 different procedures at MJ's site.
Is this even a thing in the manual that Grandfather Yamaha (as we call him in the piano store) recommends to be done? If so, what’s the recommended mileage?
 

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Is this even a thing in the manual that Grandfather Yamaha (as we call him in the piano store) recommends to be done? If so, what’s the recommended mileage?
Service manual, lube points table. IIRC, folks over the yrs learned Goldwing guys that you should do this once or twice in the first 100,000 miles.
 

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@AtlRiderrr If you are interested I took some pictures of mine and expressed some thought's when I did mine at about 58k IIRC. Relatively sure it had either never been done or only done early on after the break in period. After seeing what I saw, I will be taking Mark's standpoint and at lease checking the moly every rear tire change. Considering I run darkside I may have to just resort to 5-8k and making sure it is where it needs to be and slap the wheel back on. It is easily done in one afternoon and is the main power delivery system so why not take the time.

 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
@AtlRiderrr If you are interested I took some pictures of mine and expressed some thought's when I did mine at about 58k IIRC. Relatively sure it had either never been done or only done early on after the break in period. After seeing what I saw, I will be taking Mark's standpoint and at lease checking the moly every rear tire change. Considering I run darkside I may have to just resort to 5-8k and making sure it is where it needs to be and slap the wheel back on. It is easily done in one afternoon and is the main power delivery system so why not take the time.

Given my luck so far this weekend, I’m not sure if I’m gonna attempt to break it open before the trip.
 

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Given my luck so far this weekend, I’m not sure if I’m gonna attempt to break it open before the trip.
I mean it isn't going to kill the thing. You saw the pics in that thread so you can guess how far gone it can be and still work. Mine does run like a top though after doing it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I mean it isn't going to kill the thing. You saw the pics in that thread so you can guess how far gone it can be and still work. Mine does run like a top though after doing it.
I noticed in the article that he mentions the rear splines are actually lubricated by the gear oil, so i feel like i can just leave that one alone. When you remove the acorn bolts can you keep the pumpkin attached to the shaft in the back without pulling it out. The front one scares me a little..lol. I feel like something is gonna happen 2 weeks before the trip…lol
 

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My advise. Before a road trip, watch a few episodes of RoadKill, take a few spare parts and just embrace the adventure.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
My advise. Before a road trip, watch a few episodes of RoadKill, take a few spare parts and just embrace the adventure.
I know right? Oil and filter is gonna happen…and new gear oil, and air filter check…perhaps new brake pads. Drive shaft just feels like it could go wrong at the wrong time..lol. But i did ride through a hurricane with it a year ago, so i bet it’s a little dry.
 

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I noticed in the article that he mentions the rear splines are actually lubricated by the gear oil, so i feel like i can just leave that one alone. When you remove the acorn bolts can you keep the pumpkin attached to the shaft in the back without pulling it out. The front one scares me a little..lol. I feel like something is gonna happen 2 weeks before the trip…lol
You can remove the whole drive shaft and rear "pumpkin" as one unit as long as you don't go full Paul Bunyon and yank it out hard. After you remove the wheel and the 4 bolts you just kinda gently jiggle the whole thing and pull slightly and it will slide out easy-peasy. When I did mine I didn't even mess with the final drive splines other then to shove some moly in the small space between the retaining clip and the gasket that holds the oil in. I just wanted to make sure the rubber didn't dry out. The job is really easy, have confidence it is really straight forward.
 

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Also you are rocking a GEN 2 and I think the U-Joint is easer to finagle out of its "spot" on the engine splines. I had to make a couple of my fingers bend in ways they didn't like even with both dust covers off but in all seriousness it's as easy as pulling Lego's apart, spreading some moly and then putting them back. It's super simple.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Also you are rocking a GEN 2 and I think the U-Joint is easer to finagle out of its "spot" on the engine splines. I had to make a couple of my fingers bend in ways they didn't like even with both dust covers off but in all seriousness it's as easy as pulling Lego's apart, spreading some moly and then putting them back. It's super simple.
I have a Gen III. Pretty sure the 15’ is a Gen III but i could be wrong.

So once you remove that footpeg cover thing with 5 or so bolts…and the dust covers. The shaft with the u joint just kinda pops right out when you remove the acorn and shaft? Or the acorn and shaft come out of the ujoint, then the point comes out on its own?
 

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I have a Gen III. Pretty sure the 15’ is a Gen III but i could be wrong.

So once you remove that footpeg cover thing with 5 or so bolts…and the dust covers. The shaft with the u joint just kinda pops right out when you remove the acorn and shaft? Or the acorn and shaft come out of the ujoint, then the point comes out on its own?
I didn't remove the footpeg drop hanger. I just took off the U shaped dust cover and fenagled the other one to the side (probably easier to just take the drop hanger off and let it hang in retrospect)
The pumpkin and the shaft will slide out as one part
The U-Joint you have to slide out with your fingertips but that is easy as pie if you have the hand space.
I am not 100% what you mean by "acorn" but the whole thing is just the rear wheel, pumpkin and shaft as one unit, and the U-Joint. Thats it. None of it is connected in any way other than the moly, a spring you don't need to get to and wont get lost, and the grace of Papa Yamaha himself.
 

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I have a Gen III. Pretty sure the 15’ is a Gen III but i could be wrong.
I am pretty sure you are right. Look at it this way, if you do it it will be good for the bike and I assure you it isn't hard or complicated. If you don't your bike cam off the showroom floor only 6 years ago and obviously had dealership service since then. Mine is 19-20 years old and I don't think when I did it (a month ago? maybe?) it had been done in over a decade at least. The metal they made these things with (again going off the GEN 1 I am not sure about gen 2 or 3) is extremely hard. Japan is renound for it's metal creation and perfection. I buy and sell the finest Japanese golf clubs and while the point is not to make them that solid the tolerances that they set on a batch of metal for creating anything rivals even the Swiss. This is not Chinese pot-metal it's Japanese hardened STEEL. Even if yours is dry and covered in rust dust it won't hurt it for a long while of abuse. #justsayin
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I am pretty sure you are right. Look at it this way, if you do it it will be good for the bike and I assure you it isn't hard or complicated. If you don't your bike cam off the showroom floor only 6 years ago and obviously had dealership service since then. Mine is 19-20 years old and I don't think when I did it (a month ago? maybe?) it had been done in over a decade at least. The metal they made these things with (again going off the GEN 1 I am not sure about gen 2 or 3) is extremely hard. Japan is renound for it's metal creation and perfection. I buy and sell the finest Japanese golf clubs and while the point is not to make them that solid the tolerances that they set on a batch of metal for creating anything rivals even the Swiss. This is not Chinese pot-metal it's Japanese hardened STEEL. Even if yours is dry and covered in rust dust it won't hurt it for a long while of abuse. #justsayin
I feel ya. Just belly flopping my bike today really took the gusto out of me for the weekend😆
 
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