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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
scenario:
  • bike stationary kickstand "in"
  • engine running
  • in Neutral
  • selected "S" Sport mode
  • when deploying kickstand "out", the bike switches to "T" Touring
  • when retracting kickstand "in" it goes back to "S"
also when ridding and downshifting and braking, sometimes it goes from "S" to "T" at random, no pattern,.... obviously when some switch voltage interruption (or drop) is detected it affects the Drive Mode selection?
No clue of how to remedy this annoying thing ?
 

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Versys 1000 CBF1000 VFR800
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The mode switch is very simple.... green wire goes to ECU, black to ground. Nothing else in the circuit.....
Sidestand switch part of starting circuit...... not even related but tied to the ECU eventually.
Sounds like your dealer might have to hook up his computer and check OBD, but I'd clean the mode switch fer fun.
 
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Have to take it out of auto-select mode. ECU has a program that uses the lean angle sensor sensor, throttle and brake input to calculate rider skill and switches accordingly. If you want it to stay in Sport mode, have to ride harder. 😎😏🤔😉😜

Kidding of course. I'd look for a way to read the codes myself, but agree with Rayzerman.

You can use a volt meter in either resistance mode, or "voltage drop test" to determine whether the switch is actually failing. Be sure to apply light pressure to the switch in various ways as you test it.
 

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When was the last time you PMed your electrical connections? Find every multi-gang connector you can, separate them, clean them, pack with dielectric grease and reassemble. May be corrosion in the connections causing intermittent issues.
 

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I wouldn't "pack" electrical connections with dielectric grease. I would clean, reconnect and then coat the outside of the connection with DG.

Dielectric grease is silicone-based grease that repels moisture and prevents electrical connections from corroding. The grease is a non-conductor of electricity. You are therefore advised not to apply it on mating surfaces of electrical connection.
 

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I wouldn't "pack" electrical connections with dielectric grease. I would clean, reconnect and then coat the outside of the connection with DG.

Dielectric grease is silicone-based grease that repels moisture and prevents electrical connections from corroding. The grease is a non-conductor of electricity. You are therefore advised not to apply it on mating surfaces of electrical connection.
Agreed.. to a point. DEG will pack the connector and hold out moister better than an external prophelatic application which may be subject to external conditions that "wipe"/"wash" it away quicker. The electrical connections are established mechanically when the 2 connects slide together; wiping off any DEG between the 2 in the process.
 

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Agreed.. to a point. DEG will pack the connector and hold out moister better than an external prophelatic application which may be subject to external conditions that "wipe"/"wash" it away quicker. The electrical connections are established mechanically when the 2 connects slide together; wiping off any DEG between the 2 in the process.
Yep, this is also true. I have used ACF-50 on connections also. It penetrates and eats away at the corrosion. Also leaves a protective film.
 
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I've been using this product for years: DeoxIT D5



80247


Works wonders on electrical connections.


80248


No messy greasy involved.

80249
 

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The mode switch is a normally closed switch. If there is any interruption in the switch or wiring, it will switch modes. My switch broke internally because I pushed it instead of sliding it. Anyway, take the switch apart, inspect it and either repair it ( I was able to repair the broken part with JB Weld) or clean the contacts. It's a bad design. I don't know why the designed it as a normally closed switch or even why it's a slide switch instead of a momentary push switch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The mode switch is a normally closed switch. If there is any interruption in the switch or wiring, it will switch modes. My switch broke internally because I pushed it instead of sliding it. Anyway, take the switch apart, inspect it and either repair it ( I was able to repair the broken part with JB Weld) or clean the contacts. It's a bad design. I don't know why the designed it as a normally closed switch or even why it's a slide switch instead of a momentary push switch.
bad design +1, they should have left the "dedicated switch for the screen and heated grips" and leave the T&S Modes "in the Menu", it's not that people change modes every 10 min.

I'll take the switch apart and clean/fix

...or "permanently bridge/splice in S mode"?
 

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I don't know why the designed it as a normally closed switch or even why it's a slide switch instead of a momentary push switch.
An NC switch simplifies the electronics a little. And I think a slide switch is more immune to the "debouncing" problem that a momentary push button switch is.

I think the only reason MamaYama put the Mode switch on the handlebars instead of in the menus is rider convenience. Me? I'm an old wuss. I leave my FJR in Touring mode. It's already twice as powerful as my GPz750. I don't need more power, well, the same power, more quickly.
 

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It really doesn't simplify the electronics. When you're writing the software, you can program it for an NO or a NC. It all in the configuration. A lot of the gear I install in aircraft can be configured via the config software for an NO or an NC switch. As to the location of the switch, yes, on the handlebars are convenient if you're going to use it. Once I figure out I liked sport mode, I've left it in that mode. Unfortunately, I broke the switch when I was playing with it after purchasing the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I think the only reason MamaYama put the Mode switch on the handlebars instead of in the menus is rider convenience.
If they did it for convenience, then they should have left a dedicated button for the windscreen (as before) I use my "windscreen up and down" adjustment all the time during a ride. And people select T or S once a month/ year and it stays there.
With all these fancy TFT displays, you need to dive deep into menu to change things, not very safe on a "motorcycle".
 

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It really doesn't simplify the electronics.
Yes, it does. I'm not talking about the software for the hardware, but down at the nuts 'n bolts gate level. Case in point: the injectors. If you take a close look at the schematics, errr, wiring diagrams, the injectors and ignition coils are always hot, in that they always have 12 volts applied. The ECU applies a battery return to them to activate them. It simplifies the internal electronics. Look at the right side of Page 3.
 

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I"m going to disagree. The switch toggles a gate. It's still 2 wires. Change the state of one wire and trigger the gate. From there it's programming.
 

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If they did it for convenience, then they should have left a dedicated button for the windscreen (as before) I use my "windscreen up and down" adjustment all the time during a ride. And people select T or S once a month/ year and it stays there.
I am quite the opposite actually. I rarely use my windscreen button as I like the full-up position of the Touring screen. However, I switch between T and S mode quite often. When it's wet I use T, when I ride within the city I use T. When I want to have fun I use S. If my wife is on the back I mostly use T, etc.
 

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I"m going to disagree. The switch toggles a gate. It's still 2 wires. Change the state of one wire and trigger the gate. From there it's programming.
My point is that it isn't the two wires or the software. That doesn't change. The configuration of the transistors inside the gate is simpler when you are switching the drain (return) rather than the source (the hot side). See Sample.pdf.
 

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I see nothing that makes it simpler. Whether you switch A+ or Gnd doesn't make a hill of beans difference. Same number of wires, same components, same length of wire runs, same current draw.......
There are a bazillion analog triggers.
 

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I am quite the opposite actually. I rarely use my windscreen button as I like the full-up position of the Touring screen. However, I switch between T and S mode quite often. When it's wet I use T, when I ride within the city I use T. When I want to have fun I use S. If my wife is on the back I mostly use T, etc.
I'm the opposite. I leave my throttle mode in S and am frequently adjusting my screen height depending on the winds, temperature I'm riding in, freeway riding or carving canyons.......
 
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