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Discussion Starter #1
Retorqued the steering bearing but wobble is still there. So need new bearings at 3200 mi as it's getting worse as it's too annoying to ride at this point. I want to learn to work on my own bike but don't see much detail on removing lower tree in Haynes manual. They imply I should already know what I am doing. Or is it difficult enough if I need to ask I shouldn't try?
Can't find it searching forum and give up. Is there a thread that covers the removal? Thanks, Jim
 

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I just did mine last month. Toughest part for me was setting lower race on frame/tube (due to access) and then removing the old race from the lower bracket. I had a cut-off tool with metal wheel. Used old race to re-install new onto the lower bracket. Took around 3 hours. Removed windshield to give a little more room.
 

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Retorqued the steering bearing but wobble is still there. So need new bearings at 3200 mi as it's getting worse as it's too annoying to ride at this point. I want to learn to work on my own bike but don't see much detail on removing lower tree in Haynes manual. They imply I should already know what I am doing. Or is it difficult enough if I need to ask I shouldn't try? Can't find it searching forum and give up. Is there a thread that covers the removal?
Thanks, Jim
Jim,

As said, there are a number of FJR forums, at least five, and they will have decent posts on the head bearing change to show you the way. Any more experienced riders can give you good help also; the FJR is fairly conventional in that area. The worst part is probably getting the lower race removed from the fork tree.

Some say to partially cut the lower race with a saw or cutting wheel, then split it off with a hammer and chisel. Some say you can drive it off with a hammer and a drive punch. One guy showed using a power chisel to pop the old race off, in two seconds flat. In any case, cut one side of the lower race with a saw once you get it off, and use the old race as an installation tool to seat the new lower race on the fork tree. Dry ice can shrink the fork tree column, and a toaster oven or heat gun can warm up the new lower race, to help with the installation of the lower race. The rest of the work will be fairly straight-forward.

Since I have open joists in my garage, I can support the bike with ropes when removing the front fork tree. There is also a DIY bike hanger frame, made from a few lengths of black-iron pipe, which can pivot flat later to store against a wall when done. The hanger frame stands on any flat floor. It is only about two feet taller than the bike. Ropes, straps, or chains carry the weight. Heavy ratchet straps are good, there. Search out those posts, if you want.

Worst case, shop around the independent bike shops or dealers for some qualified techs, and get a few estimates. first. In the USA, most states outlaw any shop from trying to go much over the written estimate.
.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'll check other forums also. So the lower bracket does not have to be removed? I was wondering if lower brace had to come out and if so was it a big ordeal. Independent shop near me is reasonable so will stop in there to see what he says. Thanks

" jtlanejr 03:39 PM Today
I just did mine last month. Toughest part for me was setting lower race on frame/tube (due to access) and then removing the old race from the lower bracket. I had a cut-off tool with metal wheel. Used old race to re-install new onto the lower bracket. Took around 3 hours. Removed windshield to give a little more room."
 

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yes, you have to remove both upper and lower "outer race" on the frame head tube and replace with what comes from the kit. Then there is a bearing seat on the lower bracket (or lower triple tree) that just requires the proper tool to remove. Then reuse that seat to drive on the new part. I loosely set the triple in a vise and drove it in that way. There are several write ups with videos.
 

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Here's some pics for the OP... ;-)
I've done this on my '05 FJR and my old '95 ST11...
On my FJR, the original non-tapers ball bearing set looks great for 60K miles....
I did it just because and not due to any wobble... (I really need to let go of the bars one of these days... LOL).


Mr. BR
 

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I think at minimum you need:

A drift with about 3/16" diameter flat tip. About 9" long. If it is much longer it is hard to hold everything when driving the new inner bottom bearing over the steering stem.

I also had a steel rod 1/2" diameter 14" or longer. Thus was very handy to drive the upper outer race out of the chassis. That has to be done from underneath where there isn't enough room to swing hammer to use the other drift which works great from the top.

Motion Pro makes a $50 bearing race driver kit that greatly helps hold the outer races square when driving them into the chassis. Some say Harbor Freight offers a similar kit. Be sure to bring a new race to verify fit. Another said his O'Reilly, Autozone, etc, rents/loans tools and had the race driver.
https://www.motionpro.com/product/08-0550

Note the All-Balls tapered bearings kit packs the bearings and races paired. Do not mix bearing and race because they are manufactured together. Open only one bearing/race bag, don't open the other until immediacy before need.

The spanner adapter is available on eBay for about $25. Use a 6" socket extension on torque wrench so you can not apply a side load on the nut then there will be no torque correction or fudge factor.

Most anything can be used under the exhaust headers to support the front while you work on it. Lift the tire about 2" off the ground so the wheel will roll out from under the fender.

Do not disassemble the brakes. There is a plate under the bottom fork bridge which the brake lines run. Think it is held by a single 10 mm hex head bolt.

The air chisel thing really works but there is a lot of opportunity for tool to slip and mar soft aluminum. A Demel mototool with cutoff wheel can cut a horizontal slot for the air chisel to drive with less chance of slippage.

Traditionally we cut a vertical slit then finished breaking through with hammer and cold chisel. The cutoff wheel can not cut all the way through with the race at the bottom. A cold chisel and hammer can slowly walk the race up. Might take an hour or two.

Especially if you call in advance, automobile machine shops can remove the inside lower race for you then install new bearing. Make sure they understand the seal has to go on first, bearing second.

This looks like it would be handy for removing the inner bottom race: https://www.harborfreight.com/bearing-separator-63662.html

In any case cut a vertical slit all the way through the old race. Then use this race upside down to drive the new bearing on the stem. The slit makes it trivial to remove with a screwdriver.
 
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Discussion Starter #9
Well I stopped by the local independent shop. Bearing install $400-$600 depending on how long it takes but said stop by with the bike .(Is the lower triple tree that hard to remove?) He looked at my tires which were put on by PO at dealer at some point with 2,700 mi on the bike when I got it. He said tire is starting to cup as it was installed backward. He said Conti Attack should be installed with arrow facing toward the front of the bike and is not a directional arrow . So waiting to hear back from Michelin to confirm that . He said take care of that , then see where the bike is.
 

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Well I stopped by the local independent shop. Bearing install $400-$600 depending on how long it takes but said stop by with the bike .(Is the lower triple tree that hard to remove?) He looked at my tires which were put on by PO at dealer at some point with 2,700 mi on the bike when I got it. He said tire is starting to cup as it was installed backward. He said Conti Attack should be installed with arrow facing toward the front of the bike and is not a directional arrow . So waiting to hear back from Michelin to confirm that . He said take care of that , then see where the bike is.
Uhhh, what :???:?

The arrows on the tire are directional arrows. If this guy is telling you to install them backwards, well, your bike your choice but I believe I'd being going elsewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
He said on Conti roll the bike so the arrow is at the bottom of the tire. The arrow should point foward .There is the word "front" with the arrow and both should face front of the bike . I'm doubting it will cure my wobble. He is a decent guy so I'll give him benefit of doubt and wait to see what Continental says. Going to try and find any info online tonight. Will post as soon as I find out.
 

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He said on Conti roll the bike so the arrow is at the bottom of the tire. The arrow should point foward .There is the word "front" with the arrow and both should face front of the bike . I'm doubting it will cure my wobble. He is a decent guy so I'll give him benefit of doubt and wait to see what Continental says. Going to try and find any info online tonight. Will post as soon as I find out.
Pretty sure not just me, but suggest get away and stay away from that guy.
The arrow on a motorcycle tire is the rotation direction arrow. Plain and simple.
If you do as this "shop" says, and have said arrow on the bottom, and pointng forward, then when you are riding forward, then the tire will be rotating backwards.
The wheels have directional arrows on them too, so is his advice the same ?
It isn't just a Conti thing or brand D, M or B thing. It's how motorcycle tires are made.

Like Russ posted, it's your bike and choice of who works on your stuff, but I would stay far far away from guys like that.
 

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Well I stopped by the local independent shop. Bearing install $400-$600 depending on how long it takes but said stop by with the bike .(Is the lower triple tree that hard to remove?)
You keep asking that question. Is not hard at all to remove the upper and lower fork bridges. It takes about an hour to take everything apart. It takes about an hour to put everything back. It takes about an hour to remove the inner bottom bearing race, remove 2 races from the chassis, and press 2 new races in the chassis, one on the steering stem, plus grease.

Is not hard but if you do it yourself make sure to show it to your wife when it is all apart. Should get a reaction.

He looked at my tires which were put on by PO at dealer at some point with 2,700 mi on the bike when I got it. He said tire is starting to cup as it was installed backward. He said Conti Attack should be installed with arrow facing toward the front of the bike and is not a directional arrow . So waiting to hear back from Michelin to confirm that . He said take care of that , then see where the bike is.
Arrow facing forward when arrow is above the axle or below the axle?

That dealer is a dolt because the arrow indicates direction of rotation. And "cupping".

No motorcycle tire ever cups. Cupping occurs at one or a few places on the tire spanning multiple tread blocks. Irrespective of the tread pattern. Scalloping is a variation of feathering, both of which are undesirable wear patterns which repeat with every tread block around the tire due to scrubbing. On automobiles feathering usually indicates wheels out of alignment. On motorcycles there isn't anything you can do about it.

Motorcycle tires must scallop due to the rounded profile. The center is larger in diameter than the tread to either side but when both are in contact with the road at the same time the longer circumference and the shorter circumference being forced to move at the same speed must fight each other. One or both will scrub. Tread blocks will squirm under the load. Edges of the tread blocks will wear different than the center of the tread blocks.

Can increase tire pressure to minimize the width of the road contact patch. Narrower width for less difference in rolling circumference for less scrubbing. But also less traction.
 

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It isn't just a Conti thing or brand D, M or B thing. It's how motorcycle tires are made.
Continental puts direction arrows, brand, and tire model, in the tread of many of their tires, in addition to the mandated DOT arrows at the edges, and others in the sidewall.

I don't doubt the possibility the tire is mounted the wrong direction, but I agree the dealer's explanation is hokey.
 

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The air chisel thing really works but there is a lot of opportunity for tool to slip and mar soft aluminum. A Demel mototool with cutoff wheel can cut a horizontal slot for the air chisel to drive with less chance of slippage.
.[/QUOTE]

I believe I'm the member who introduced the idea of using an air hammer to remove this race, but what you just described varies quite a bit from my original post. If done exactly as I said without omitting anything, nothing will be damaged. BTW, I didn't use a Dremel to cut the slots either, I used a 3" cutoff wheel in an air tool. Here's my original post on this subject:
I used a cutoff wheel to put a couple of slots in the inner race on my steering stem directly across from each other. Then with the help of an assistant, we put a cold chisel in those slots and using an air hammer with the power reduced to hit the chisel, pushed the race off very easily. We would alternate hitting one side then the other and it slid right off. Didn't put a mark of any kind on the triple tree because it was never touched.
 

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Continental puts direction arrows, brand, and tire model, in the tread of many of their tires, in addition to the mandated DOT arrows at the edges, and others in the sidewall.
I don't doubt the possibility the tire is mounted the wrong direction, but I agree the dealer's explanation is hokey.
Yup, know all that. Suppose in my head shaking over that shops comment, I wasn't clear in my wording.
My mindset and point I was trying to make was all tire brands I know of use directional arrows to indicate direction of rotation.
And shop dude saying "when on the bottom the arrow should point forward" was a Conti tire specification is pure moo poo.
 
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This is what you get when you hire the cheapest help you can get and throw them into the fray with zero training with a management that either just assumes they know what they are doing or plain doesn’t care. A big reason of why “bike shops” are on the endangered species list. The shop manager & I would be discussing this at length.
 

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Gadzooks.... that's a new one. In my 40 yrs of fooling around with bikes, including a few years working at a dealership where I changed tires, I've NEVER heard the tire directional arrow explained like that.
It's funny and a little sad... and 100% wrong IMO. As stated by others, "the arrow indicates direction of rotation".
Mr. BR
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Continental said tread pattern direction is not an issue. Go with arrow. From searching last night Conti attack front tire mounting had alot of people confused. Was not doing anything until I heard from Conti anyway so I move on. N4HHE ,I kept asking because it's out of my comfort zone . But if it's an hour for you to get apart I'll go for it even if it takes me all day. I have to figure out a way to secure the bike but not worried. I may as well try as losing faith in shops. Dealer is out as they told me bike was serviced when I bought it. Tested coolant ,not serviced. I was more concerned with disassembly to get the tree out than changing the bearings. Local auto machine shop engine builder will do it if I have issues. Just not happy having to tear a 2016es with under 6k mi for what I see as something that should not have been an issue. The wobble bothers me as it's not supposed to be there and I cannot accept that it is. I'm no engineer but I don't see how it would not stress other components as that force is there holding bars or not.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Continental said tread pattern direction is not an issue. Go with arrow. From searching last night Conti attack front tire mounting had alot of people confused. Was not doing anything until I heard from Conti anyway so I move on. N4HHE ,I kept asking because it's out of my comfort zone . But if it's an hour for you to get apart I'll go for it even if it takes me all day. I have to figure out a way to secure the bike but not worried. I may as well try as losing faith in shops. Dealer is out as they told me bike was serviced when I bought it. Tested coolant ,not serviced. I was more concerned with disassembly to get the tree out than changing the bearings. Local auto machine shop engine builder will do it if I have issues. Just not happy having to tear a 2016es with under 6k mi for what I see as something that should not have been an issue. The wobble bothers me as it's not supposed to be there and I cannot accept that it is. I'm no engineer but I don't see how it would not stress other components as that force is there holding bars or not.
 
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