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Where did you get dust seals? I don't think the OEM ones will work on tapered roller bearings. OEM look different than the seals supplied with an All Balls kit, for example.
I used OEM seals with All Balls, no problems in 10+yrs/100K miles
 

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I'd come and pay my respects Bobby but I'll be dead too. :LOL:
 

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2007 FJR1300A
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With all this anti All Balls head bearing talk I an afraid that the only thing keeping the bearings from falling out is the seals ..... so I guess I am a gonna die and so are the other 4 bikes I have put them in.
Darn the bad luck ..... :eek:
Yer gonna die ;)
 

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2015 FJR-1300ESF
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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
What I get out of this discussion is that if you want non-China bearings, you might want the Pivot Works kit. Beats hunting down seals separately. If you don't want to buy the OEM ones from Partzilla etc., they seem to be a pain to find.
 

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I personally would not run the OEM open cage seals with tapered bearings. Won't keep the dust out. Tapered bearings and open cage bearings use different seals for a reason. Yeah, they will probably survive, but why not use the right style.
 

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Nope. But there's plenty of Youtube videos showing how to do the job. One by Delboy is very helpful.

Torque procedure is easy. With a torque wrench and the proper spanner/socket for the stem nuts you tighten to about 35, back off to about 10, then retighten to about 16-ish.
 

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I personally can't imagine using a torque wrench to set tapered bearing preload. You are going for a turning resistance on the bearing of practically 0 with no endplay. Always just set them by feel, whether it is a bike headset or the wheel bearings on a truck. In general loose is worse than tight, but neither one is going to wear out a tapered bearing in a headset application.
 

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I agree OJ. I personally slowly tightened them up while turning the upper triple back and forth until I felt "resistance". Let it get a little stiffer than backed off. I then used the torque wrench and procedure and it felt the same when done.
 

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This isn't a criticism, Sparky, just a different observation. I live near the Timken Company, have friends and relatives who've worked there over the years, applied for a job there once, and would love to have the level of trust in their bearings that you do. I've had several sets of Timken wheel bearings fail with low mileage on late-model SUVs, so I have no perception of their "superior quality" over other brands. I truly wish I could say they were superior.

I installed an All Balls kit with no reservations... on the basis of forum recommendations, and on the prior experience of a set I installed years ago on my '81 Seca (the FJR's grandad). So far, I haven't been disappointed.
In western developed nations if you sell baby formula made with melamine or cough syrup made with car antifreeze someone goes to jail. In china it's called cost savings for export items.
 

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In western developed nations if you sell baby formula made with melamine or cough syrup made with car antifreeze someone goes to jail. In china it's called cost savings for export items.
Not quite sure the angle you were taking by responding to my post, because Sparky's comment (and therefore mine) was about deciding on a product specifically based on perceived quality, not country of origin.

I agree with you, though. That's a principle upon which we can decide... to a point... which product we will purchase for a specific use. Where is it (reportedly) made? Previous posts in this thread alluded to members who choose to purchase kits not made in China (for example), and it was also mentioned that some Timken bearings are made in China.

Your point leads, though, to another question that's worth personal consideration. It's sort of the flip side of that coin: are you willing to "die on the hill" of excluding a particular country of origin completely on principle, even to the point of buying a known inferior product? I don't think there's a right or wrong answer, because it's a personal question. And one person's "inferior" is another's "superior."

Just look at the car brands we choose to drive. Some of my friends swear by a specific vehicle brand that I see consistently smoking from the exhaust, and needing more low-mileage repairs than any other brand. And it seems like their back window usually sports a decal of a stick figure peeing on the vehicle brand in which I've historically driven hundreds of thousands of trouble-free miles.

Hence the phrase, "To each their own."
 
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