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2007 FJR1300A
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Yep, I remember reading/hearing somewhere that you don't want to wear gloves when using the angle grinder, and why. I take my rings off, too.
I don't wear gloves near most spinny things. Have not worn a ring since I smashed mine on my finger about a year into being married. 32 years, still married - ring is still sitting in wifes jewelry box.
 

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Versys 1000, VFR800
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Air chisel and the lower race will be off in seconds with no cutting... however if cutting with a grinder wheel, don't sweat cutting into the shaft a touch... plenty of bearing area, just smooth off any burrs with a file.

Threaded rod bearing press works the best for the steering neck races. Smear a light coat of grease on the races and they'll slide in a bit better.
 

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....
I like your improvised bearing-race-press idea. Not sure I'll be able to duplicate it, but will know more with the photos. PM incoming.

I forgot to take pics last night but I found something similar online. Imagine those big round aluminum "discs" as plates and that is what I put together. Use the old races in between the plates and butting against the new races. Snug it up just until things don't move, ensure the old race is centered on the new one and then just crank on the nuts pulling it all together.

I wish I had seen this tool when I did mine. Looks like it's made for just this purpose.


And one of the best videos...

 
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2015 FJR-1300ESF
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711 Posts
Discussion Starter · #105 · (Edited)
Shiny!

That looks like an elegant way to drive in the new bearing races. More so than whacking things with a hammer.

A concern would be that the linked tool might not have enough reach, being designed for bicycles. I'll measure my FJR later & report back.
 

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I don't wear gloves near most spinny things. Have not worn a ring since I smashed mine on my finger about a year into being married. 32 years, still married - ring is still sitting in wifes jewelry box.
Same. 32 years, ring sits in safe the whole time. I can grind with gloves on though....
 

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Versys 1000, VFR800
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That whole video would be a lot different if the front end of the bike is on..... lol. I use a piece of pipe to drive on that lower bearing...
 

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In Delboy's video posted above he give a good reason not to do that. It's high carbon brittle steel (or something like that) and it could crack when hit with a hammer.

But I know guys have done that for ages. Your choice.
 
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I almost started a new thread, but this one is still going so here goes my story. 2004 model. I just changed the headset with AllBalls tapered bearings right before a trip to the mountains last week(two Fridays ago). I too was fighting headshake on decel between 50-30 mph. Sucked too, because I take my hands off the bars on all my bikes when I'm slowing down. The FJR was unnerving. Almost sure some of it was the front tire, but I've changed to tapered bearings on all my previous bikes that had ball bearings and improved the handling of every bike.
Observations on the swap. Straightforward swap as usual. I cut the lower race off of the stem with a cut-off wheel on a 4 1/2" grinder. Everything went together smoothly. Inverting the old bearing race works good to tap the new lower bearing into place with the proper size pipe. Nothing new about the install.
Observations riding the bike after the swap. No more headshake, at any speed, accelerating or decelerating. Hands off at x x x with the throttle locked is straight as an arrow, same at all speeds. Decel from any speed to below 20, hands off, no wobble. What I did notice is that it feels completely different now, very neutral. The road feel that I was used to on these bikes seems to be gone. One member on here commented that it felt "vague" to him. That may describe the feeling I get now. Not sure. I liked the old feedback I was used to before(minus that annoying headshake). This last trip was a 2500 miler through the best roads in the Ozarks, and I pushed it hard. So hard that the rear tire was toast, on both sides and the center was slick. The bike railed through the corners, and I wasn't shy with the go grip! Bought a new tire to get home on(right under 500 miles) because rain had come Friday with snow that night. Made it back in great shape. What a ride!
Not sure I like the feel of the bike as much now. But, I did rebuild the forks with new Yamaha seals(twice in 6 years, first time was AllBalls, they suck), new Yamaha inner fork tubes, and fresh PJ1 fork oil. Also put a new Pilot Power 3 on the front to match the 3 on the rear. That has a huge effect on how it handled. I still think the tapered bearings changes the feel of this bike, just can't put my finger on it. Has anyone else felt less feedback through the bars after the tapered bearing swap?
 

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2015 FJR-1300ESF
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711 Posts
Discussion Starter · #112 ·
I measured. The bicycle headset tool linked above should work. Headstock tube on the FJR is a good bit less than 9" tall, so the reach of the tool should be enough.

With the fuel tank propped up, there should be enough room to swing the tool's handle.

Alternately, one could place the handle end of the tool below rather than above the headstock.
 

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2015 FJR-1300ESF
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711 Posts
Discussion Starter · #113 · (Edited)
Re: the bicycle headset tool mentioned above. Received mine yesterday.



This is one of the tool's mandrels race drivers, with a race from a spare 32006 bearing sitting on it. Perfect fit. Just a tiny bit smaller than the race itself, should push it into the frame neatly.

I also am ordering a 36mm, 6-point socket for the large hex nut cover on the steering head.
 

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2015 FJR-1300ESF
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Discussion Starter · #114 ·
This thread may have a happy ending soon.

Borrowed stem nut spanner + bearing race removal tool are to be delivered today. 36mm socket to be here Friday.

I might actually get the bearing swap done by next week.

FWIW, I will be jacking the bike up using my special exhaust-saver jack adapter (I owe a photo or two), and jackstands under the T-Rex crash bars while I work on it.

I think the first thing I'm going to do is, unhook the front brake calipers, and hang them off the crash bars to get them out of the way.

Then remove the front wheel.

Then go from there.
 

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2015 FJR-1300ESF
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Discussion Starter · #115 ·

My jacking adapter. Avoids putting the weight of the bike on the exhaust pipes and headers.

I made some changes to this one (https://www.fjr1300.info/howto/bikestand.html), because I didn't like how it uses only very small points of contact (the "spur" on the bottom of the right side of the engine, and the guard for the oil drain plug). My design lets the weight rest on much larger flats on the bottom of the engine, while avoiding any force on the plastics.

If anyone is interested in copying this design, I'll post another photo with dimensions. The base is a 1' section of 2x4.
 

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2007 FJR1300A
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2x4 across the bottom of the pipes is fine. Unless you are lifting it off the centerstand
 

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Versys 1000, VFR800
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On the FJR, no worries about the headers as Oldjeep says. Now on the Kawi, they describe a 2x4 lifting adapter which lifts on the entire oil pan.... on it the headers aren't so robust. The do sell a jack adapter tool as well.
 

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2015 FJR-1300ESF
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711 Posts
Discussion Starter · #118 ·
Getting there. Wheel and forks off. Lower triple tree member on the bench.

Old bearing races removed from the frame. Bottom one was a breeze. Lower was still a PITA, but easier with the Park Tool doohickey (https://www.amazon.com/Park-Tool-RT-2-Head-Remover/dp/B000VY1QFI) than it was years ago on the Vstrom, with a large flatblade screwdriver used then.

That headset cup remover tool needs to be about 18" longer for motorcycle use, so as to get past a fairing for easier hitting with a hammer when removing the upper race.

Have to pause for now until tomorrow evening. First task then will be cleaning up all the existing grease, to prepare for cutting the old inner bearing race off the triple clamp.
 

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2015 FJR-1300ESF
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Discussion Starter · #119 ·
Some tips for those doing this job in the future. I'll go into some detail, as it's the kind of detail I would have found helpful when preparing for the job.

--one of the first steps you should take: remove the windshield and set it aside. Even if you aren't using an overhead pipe stand (though you should, see below), you'll want it out of the way. Work area will be less crowded, and you won't have to worry about scratching it.


--Unscrew the plastic splash shield (debris guard? Not sure of the official Yamaha term) and accompanying brake hose support from the lower triple clamp member, while you're down there taking the front wheel off. Two 11mm hex head screws must be removed to free the splash shield, then two 8mm hex screws for the brake hose holder.

I may end up removing the splash shield completely, depends on how much it gets in the way, & whether it can be done without cracking open brake lines.

You'll need the slack on the brake hoses, and the lower triple clamp + steering stem shaft has to come out for the steering bearing swap.


--even if you are planning to support the bike with jackstands under crash bars, make or borrow one of those overhead stands/frames made out of iron pipe. They're great.

I'm borrowing one for this job, and it gives me a handy place to hang things like work lights and the handlebars. Iron pipe is ideal for this job, as it's inexpensive, strong enough to support a decent load, and itself heavy enough to not move unless you mean to move it. Bonus feature: disassembles easily for storage or transport.


--if you have the Helibars plate-style riser kit (i.e. HeliBars Handlebar Riser Yamaha FJR1300 2006-2022 | 20% ($55.80) Off! - RevZilla ), go ahead and disassemble the whole works. You'll want to have the handlebars loose, preferably suspended from your pipe stand, to keep them and their cables & hoses from crowding the steering head area. You'll have to remove the Helibars riser plate* for access to the large hex (36mm socket) "beauty cover" over the steering stem hardware.

*here it is helpful to have a "stubby" 12mm box-end wrench, preferably ratcheting, even better if it's ratcheting AND flex- or offset-head.


--take off the seat, remove the necessary hardware, and prop up the fuel tank. Gives you more room for working around the steering head. I have to do this so I can swing the handles of the bearing race installer I'm using. Getting the tank out of the way (as well as covering it with a towel) also helps prevent scratches to the paint.


--if you have an ES model like mine, be extra careful to protect the sockets at the tops of the fork tubes. They're vulnerable once you've unplugged their wiring, and you'll be removing the forks once you get the wheel off.

At some point I'll write up a recommended sequence of tasks for getting everything apart and back together, as complete as I can make it. Perhaps with some illustrations if I can be bothered.
 

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2022 FJR1300ES
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A wealth of info here. Nice work.

My previous FJR’s never exhibited wag or wobble when they were torqued correctly. But my 2022 did, big time.

On the second (or was it third) set of tires, it went away. No idea what the cause was.

Kind of like bar vibes, just because one bike doesn’t have it doesn’t mean it never happens.
 
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