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I agree with all the above information. I really advocate that you try to do as much as you can unless you are physically not able to. Purchase the factory manual and read about the procedure you are thinking about. Most people who are even the slightest mechanically inclined can do a lot of their own maintenance. I for one have not met to many mechanics who could do things or care about my precious machine more than I do. I really like to dig in and understand how these things work then go ride feeling confident with my work rather than someone I dont know.
 

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A couple of things to consider when learning to do your own maint. Buy the correct tools and understand how to use them. Have the dexterity to manipulate the hand tools correctly. That comes with practice. Understand what you are reading from the service manual. Remember the manual is written for somewhat experienced service techs. Do not depend solely on only one source for tech info.. The book does not tell you every thing. Make sure you have an understanding of how the system you want to work on works. But most importantly Know and admit what you don't know and don't be afraid to ask.
 

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Versys 1000, VFR800
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Also keep in mind there are a few things in the maintenance schedule that I consider revenue generators for dealer service.... Yamaha seems to have some short intervals for certain things like oil changes, spark plugs, etc. that are much shorter than the average of other bike manufacturers..... do what makes sense, we all know sparkplugs last longer than 8000 miles..... oh, and do not torque your drain plug to 31 ft. lbs..... it's an error, 17-20 is plenty.
 

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2020 FJR 1300ES
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When I got my bike the first video I watched from TwoWheelObsession guy is how to remove the faring. His videos just give me confidence that most of the stuff can be done by average person and with majority of generic tools.

I have the manual but it pretty much never covers how to remove parts, it just tells remove this and that. By watching his video you can see how exactly the stuff can be removed without being broken.

For example when I did the spark plugs the coil did not want to move and I was not sure whether I should just lift it or twist it or do something else. Watched the video and 10 sec later I removed the first coil.
How To Change Motorcycle Spark Plugs Yamaha FJR 1300 ES

Also the way I do it now is that I watch video about maintenance, take note of the parts/tools I need, get them before hand, then whenever I have plenty of time I do the work, no rush.
 

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Replying to three posts in no particular order:
1. Check my signature for a link to removing Series III tupperware. I think the guide is better than both the FSM and the Haynes book. There is a small gotcha on Page 5 (of 8) of the guide. Two of the little 1/4"/6 mm push pins inside the front wheel well are a little longer than the rest. They need to snap through three layers instead of two. The regular pins do not fit.
2. I, too, am a proponent of Speedbleeders. And I think the little fluid drain bag is worth picking up.
3. Ray's comment about the engine oil drain plug is spot on. A torque setting of 31 lb-ft risks stripping the threads in the aluminum crankcase. Along with the clearly wrong torque setting for that, I think the torque setting of 90 lb-ft is excessive. 75 lb-ft is more than enough.

BTW, torque is specified in pound-feet (force over distance), not foot-pounds (distance over force, which makes absolutely no sense if you think about it).
 

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110,000 miles and ten years. Valves have been checked three times and new plugs have gone in then. FWIW, none of the valves have needed adjustment yet. I can't figure why Yamaha says check them at 4000 and change them at 8000. It makes no sense.

Sounds like you've got a great trip planned. Enjoy.
 

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110,000 miles and ten years. Valves have been checked three times and new plugs have gone in then. FWIW, none of the valves have needed adjustment yet. I can't figure why Yamaha says check them at 4000 and change them at 8000. It makes no sense.

Sounds like you've got a great trip planned. Enjoy.
I believe it is to satisfy the Emission gods, to be able to get the motor certified in each country. For instance with my Versys 1000 SE the US valve check Interval is 15,200 miles. The rest of the world interval is 26,250 Miles. Same motor. Go figure.
 
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