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My '13 Mnf in June 2013 with VIN ending in 1706 has the new Battery Access Panel from the factory.
 

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my 2014 es owners manual shows that the panel can be pulled without pulling the center panels...they did away with the right side screw as depicted in the first post photos.
 

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Thank you for this write up. I just did this and found out that my supposedly brand new FJR1300 with no miles was apparently worked on. Some schmuck left a few plastic fasteners off and cracked where a bolt goes for the right panel. Off to the dealer I go now. they better not try to say I did this.
 

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nyrblue35,
sBandit did a great write up on a battery access panel modification for the 2013.. if you replace your cracked panel, make sure it looks like the one in the mod or buy one for a 2014. This panel design became standard in 2014
I dont think this is exactly the one i got (new one) however that rounded screw holder latch to the right in the picture(for lack of a better term) is not present on the one i got. Which basically means I can access the battery easier. Thank you though. I have to eventually get back to the battery to hook up my stebel so I will know for sure then. on second thought that rounded piece at the bottom right where the arrow is pointing is the same as the one i have now.
 

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my 2014 es owners manual shows that the panel can be pulled without pulling the center panels...they did away with the right side screw as depicted in the first post photos.
I installed the battery tender leads this past weekend on my 2014. Far fewer pieces to remove now. Two allen screws, two plastic popout rivets and one panel. The panel is a little tricky to get back into place properly the first time, but I can see easily doing this road-side if ever the need arose.
 

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push pin clips... order a few extra. Hex head bolts - same deal... pan head screws? $2.50/pc from the dealer. I'm in CT. Went to The Nutty Company that deals in nuts and bolts only. I bought 4 for 25 cents. It was a good day for a ride anyway and i figure I will lose at least 4 in the next 4 years. Great thread, Thanks!
 

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Thank you for this write up. I just did this and found out that my supposedly brand new FJR1300 with no miles was apparently worked on. Some schmuck left a few plastic fasteners off and cracked where a bolt goes for the right panel. Off to the dealer I go now. they better not try to say I did this.
It was the dealer. A brand new bike has no battery (or the battery wasn't not connected and charged). They charge the battery, then install it before they deliver the new bike to you. The dealer was the only one who removed/reinstalled the battery panel.
 

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push pin clips... order a few extra. Hex head bolts - same deal... pan head screws? $2.50/pc from the dealer. I'm in CT. Went to The Nutty Company that deals in nuts and bolts only. I bought 4 for 25 cents. It was a good day for a ride anyway and i figure I will lose at least 4 in the next 4 years. Great thread, Thanks!
4 push pin for 25 cents? Do they do mail order? It's $2.50 each on partzilla!
 

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i left my key on and battery died, i did the full removal first to install tender leads, then it was taking too long to charge so i had to pull it again but was able to remove the right side headlight adjustment knob and the screws for the right side of the center cowl. then i was able to lift up enough to get the pan screw, removed the battery panel without having to remove the whole center cowl, no breaks and no scrapes..
 

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For my 2014 ES, it appears the Yamaha Engineers heard your screams of pain. Two screws and two fasteners and you can get to the battery - fyi. Did not need to remove the cowling at all. Whew.....
 

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Very helpful and thanks for the post! Did this for the first time on my 2013 FJR and the pics were great. Not too bad to do overall. As you stated, that poping sound when you are pulling the snaps apart sound like you are breaking the thing, but it is sturdy. Your suggested technique of working from the top down the sides to detach worked with no issues. Thanks for the detailed post!!
 

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Can you tell me where the storage compartment accessory out fuse is located? I did a dumb thing an plugged a small air compressor into this outlet and obviously blue the fuse, duh! Just would like to know before I tackle this exercise. I too will add a fused wire run from the battery down to the seat. hind sight is 20/20!
 

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Too far ?

Along the line of "anything worth doing is worth over-doing" . . . . .

We don't really need to get to the battery most of the time, we just need to get at the terminals somehow. Adding power sockets and battery tenders is always a good idea- but if you really want to overdo it . .

Try this:

http://www.powerlet.com/product/powersport-jumper-cables/410

This kit gives you access to the full amperage of the battery and is the equivalent of moving the battery terminals to where you can reach them. It allows immediate jump starts, and gives one the ability to jump start other vehicles. Shortly after installation I used the kit to jump start a car.

We all goof up and kill the battery sooner or later, and Murphy's law says it will happen when it is cold, dark, and raining. Why torture yourself trying to take the dash apart to get to the battery ? And then you have to put it all back together again !
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
Can you tell me where the storage compartment accessory out fuse is located? I did a dumb thing an plugged a small air compressor into this outlet and obviously blue the fuse, duh! Just would like to know before I tackle this exercise. I too will add a fused wire run from the battery down to the seat. hind sight is 20/20!
For 2013 model, the Accessory DC Outlet fuse is in the main fuse box by battery.
 

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I got the project done over the weeked. Installed a battry chargeing cable under the right battery panel and installed a set of factory FJR side crash bumpers after some plastic faring adjustments per Yamaha's instructions . Needless to say, it made for a long day. thanks Edmonton for the information.
 

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Many thanks!!! Great write up and I will put it to use soon. Ordered a Powerlet for my 2013 FJR...should arrive soon! Yamaha WAKE UP!
2013 Yamaha FJR1300 - How To Access Battery



I guess Yamaha engineers efforts were so focused on making the bike awesome to ride and ultra reliable that they just had no time or energy left to make it serviceable. Case in point: The Battery and Fuses. The most complicated, time consuming, and tricky I've ever seen on any vehicle.

I recently decided I'd better do a run-through on this in my comfy, well-lit garage to get familiar with it before I some day need to on the side of a dark highway in the rain and cold (when it's most likely I will need to). Glad I did!

Please first read through the process in the OWNERS MANUAL or SERVICE MANUAL. The first time I tried it, I got only as far as trying to unsnap the instrument cowl and gave up out of fear for breaking something. But this is still very good info to know, particularly to note where the screws and clips are.


TOOLS:
  • 3 mm hex wrench / allen key
  • Philips Screwdriver
(both included in bike's took kit)​
Suggested:
  • Small container to put screws and clips in (magnetic parts tray is great)
  • 3 mm hex socket and screwdriver handle or 3mm hex driver
  • Masking Tape
  • Magnetic Phillips Screwdriver

Remove the 6 black hex screws from the left cover, instrument cowl, and right cover. These screws are easily lost so I suggest you get a couple extras (Yamaha Part: 90269-06008 "BOLT, HEX. SOCKET BUTTON"). You will not have to remove the left cover but it helps a lot for it to be loose.

Remove the 5 black push-pin-clips from left and right covers (3 on left, 2 on right). To remove these, use the short end of the hex key to push the centre bit IN (down) until it clicks. It goes in about 3 mm. This releases the clip. Use fingernail to grab outside edge of clip and pull it out. These little clips are likely easily lost or broken, so I recommend picking up a few extras from the dealer (Yamaha Part: 90269-06008 "Rivet")

Remove the two headlight adjuster knobs. NOTE: The Philips screws that hold them on are TINY and (experience talking here) the gravity path between them and the ground goes deep into parts of the engine area you will never see until the day you disassemble the engine. So DO NOT DROP THEM! I recommend using a screwdriver with a magnetic shaft (or you can magnetize your own by rubbing a strong magnet along the screwdriver several times). Someone on this forum said you don't have to remove the screws entirely. I could not get the knobs off until I had the screws all the way out. I suggest buying an extra 1 or 2 of these screws to keep on hand (Yamaha Part: 90269-06008 "SCREW, PAN HEAD").


Now the fun begins. Simply remove the instrument cowl. The manual shows where the snaps are (up the front outer sides, mostly). This is the scary part as the snaps are TOUGH to un-snap. I grabbed the bulbous part and wiggled and pulled it down and back until the snaps started coming un-done, starting at the top tip of the bulbous part working down toward the outside edge, one side at a time.. I advise against sticking anything in the crack to pry as you could easily either make marks around the edges or possibly break a snap fastener. Then you have to wiggle the bottom middle part out and eventually the whole thing comes off. I was terrified of breaking the snaps - you should be too! But they seem to be made quite strong and able to hold up to the power needed to un-do them.

I hope I described that good enough. I'd video it and put a clip here, but it would contain far too much profanity and slanderous commentary which could get me in trouble with Yamaha's lawyers.:x


There it is - the instrument cowl, or "front cowling" as the manual calls it.​

Then remove the right cover. Removing the instrument cowl has revealed one last Phillips screw holding the right cover on at the very front tip. Remove the screw and then wiggle the right cover off, unsnapping it from the fairing.


Voila!


:D

This first time took me about 20 minutes. About 15 of that was wiggling and jiggling the instrument cowl, and stopping and pondering, as I tried to figure out how to remove it without breaking anything. Now that I've done it, I think it would take me as little as 5 minutes to do it next time - if in well lit area and have all the tools at hand.

RE-INSTALL:

Reverse procedure except to install the push-pin-fasteners, you have to push the centre pin OUT from behind until it sticks out/up from the fastener head about 3 - 5 mm. Then push the fastener completely into the hole and push the centre pin in just until it is flush with the fastener head.

TIP:

What I did was install a fused accessory wire from the battery to under the seat. I used a good quality connector with battery terminal eyelet screw connectors on the battery end and an accessory plug with the positive pin insulated on the other end. (I actually just used the wires included with the Battery Tender) I carefully routed it down the fairing and under the tank, attaching it securely along the way and wrapping with a bit of electrical tape at points where it runs across a sharp edge.

Before connecting to the battery, remove the NEGATIVE terminal first. Then if you are working on the positive and accidentally bump a metal part, you will not short it out. Remember: when working on batteries, remove the negative first, and connect the negative last.

Now I can remove the seat and simply plug in a DC socket, battery clips (to boost to/from another battery), trickle charger/battery tender, etc.


NOTE TO YAMAHA:

It would be real easy for you to make that right cover panel either removable by itself or make part of it openable / removable for easy access to battery; preferably without having to remove any screws or pieces that WILL get dropped and lost.


This would be a great safety feature that would reduce your legal laibility risk because in a crash of this bike there are many things that could short out and cause a fire. Quick access to battery terminals by emergency workers would help tremendously. And nobody is going to have a clue where this battery is, so a nice battery icon (or lightning bolt power icon or something) on that access panel would be fantastic. Maybe make that a sticker that the owner can choose to put on.


AND.. if you do make an improved part, PLEASE, PLEASE make it backwards compatible with the 2013 model so we can just buy the new part (you'll make some more money here) to replace the existing one.


Look at that! One simple fix and you will increase revenues, decrease legal liability risk, increase customer satisfaction (and dealer's too, I'm pretty sure), and thus increase profit. So, why wait? Get the engineers on this TODAY!!


Thanks for listening. And by the way, the bike is absolutely awesome despite this serviceability item.
 
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