FJR Owners Forum banner
  • Hey Everyone! Enter your bike HERE to be a part of this months Bike of the Month Challenge!

1 - 20 of 59 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
2013 Yamaha FJR1300 - How To Access Battery



I guess Yamaha engineers efforts were so focused on making the bike awesome to ride and ultra reliable that they just had no time or energy left to make it serviceable. Case in point: The Battery and Fuses. The most complicated, time consuming, and tricky I've ever seen on any vehicle.

I recently decided I'd better do a run-through on this in my comfy, well-lit garage to get familiar with it before I some day need to on the side of a dark highway in the rain and cold (when it's most likely I will need to). Glad I did!

Please first read through the process in the OWNERS MANUAL or SERVICE MANUAL. The first time I tried it, I got only as far as trying to unsnap the instrument cowl and gave up out of fear for breaking something. But this is still very good info to know, particularly to note where the screws and clips are.


TOOLS:
  • 3 mm hex wrench / allen key
  • Philips Screwdriver
(both included in bike's took kit)

Suggested:
  • Small container to put screws and clips in (magnetic parts tray is great)
  • 3 mm hex socket and screwdriver handle or 3mm hex driver
  • Masking Tape
  • Magnetic Phillips Screwdriver

Remove the 6 black hex screws from the left cover, instrument cowl, and right cover. These screws are easily lost so I suggest you get a couple extras (Yamaha Part: 90269-06008 "BOLT, HEX. SOCKET BUTTON"). You will not have to remove the left cover but it helps a lot for it to be loose.

Remove the 5 black push-pin-clips from left and right covers (3 on left, 2 on right). To remove these, use the short end of the hex key to push the centre bit IN (down) until it clicks. It goes in about 3 mm. This releases the clip. Use fingernail to grab outside edge of clip and pull it out. These little clips are likely easily lost or broken, so I recommend picking up a few extras from the dealer (Yamaha Part: 90269-06008 "Rivet")

Remove the two headlight adjuster knobs. NOTE: The Philips screws that hold them on are TINY and (experience talking here) the gravity path between them and the ground goes deep into parts of the engine area you will never see until the day you disassemble the engine. So DO NOT DROP THEM! I recommend using a screwdriver with a magnetic shaft (or you can magnetize your own by rubbing a strong magnet along the screwdriver several times). Someone on this forum said you don't have to remove the screws entirely. I could not get the knobs off until I had the screws all the way out. I suggest buying an extra 1 or 2 of these screws to keep on hand (Yamaha Part: 90269-06008 "SCREW, PAN HEAD").


Now the fun begins. Simply remove the instrument cowl. The manual shows where the snaps are (up the front outer sides, mostly). This is the scary part as the snaps are TOUGH to un-snap. I grabbed the bulbous part and wiggled and pulled it down and back until the snaps started coming un-done, starting at the top tip of the bulbous part working down toward the outside edge, one side at a time.. I advise against sticking anything in the crack to pry as you could easily either make marks around the edges or possibly break a snap fastener. Then you have to wiggle the bottom middle part out and eventually the whole thing comes off. I was terrified of breaking the snaps - you should be too! But they seem to be made quite strong and able to hold up to the power needed to un-do them.

I hope I described that good enough. I'd video it and put a clip here, but it would contain far too much profanity and slanderous commentary which could get me in trouble with Yamaha's lawyers.:x


There it is - the instrument cowl, or "front cowling" as the manual calls it.​

Then remove the right cover. Removing the instrument cowl has revealed one last Phillips screw holding the right cover on at the very front tip. Remove the screw and then wiggle the right cover off, unsnapping it from the fairing.


Voila!


:D

This first time took me about 20 minutes. About 15 of that was wiggling and jiggling the instrument cowl, and stopping and pondering, as I tried to figure out how to remove it without breaking anything. Now that I've done it, I think it would take me as little as 5 minutes to do it next time - if in well lit area and have all the tools at hand.

RE-INSTALL:

Reverse procedure except to install the push-pin-fasteners, you have to push the centre pin OUT from behind until it sticks out/up from the fastener head about 3 - 5 mm. Then push the fastener completely into the hole and push the centre pin in just until it is flush with the fastener head.

TIP:

What I did was install a fused accessory wire from the battery to under the seat. I used a good quality connector with battery terminal eyelet screw connectors on the battery end and an accessory plug with the positive pin insulated on the other end. (I actually just used the wires included with the Battery Tender) I carefully routed it down the fairing and under the tank, attaching it securely along the way and wrapping with a bit of electrical tape at points where it runs across a sharp edge.

Before connecting to the battery, remove the NEGATIVE terminal first. Then if you are working on the positive and accidentally bump a metal part, you will not short it out. Remember: when working on batteries, remove the negative first, and connect the negative last.

Now I can remove the seat and simply plug in a DC socket, battery clips (to boost to/from another battery), trickle charger/battery tender, etc.

NOTE TO YAMAHA:
It would be real easy for you to make that right cover panel either removable by itself or make part of it openable / removable for easy access to battery; preferably without having to remove any screws or pieces that WILL get dropped and lost.

This would be a great safety feature that would reduce your legal laibility risk because in a crash of this bike there are many things that could short out and cause a fire. Quick access to battery terminals by emergency workers would help tremendously. And nobody is going to have a clue where this battery is, so a nice battery icon (or lightning bolt power icon or something) on that access panel would be fantastic. Maybe make that a sticker that the owner can choose to put on.

AND.. if you do make an improved part, PLEASE, PLEASE make it backwards compatible with the 2013 model so we can just buy the new part (you'll make some more money here) to replace the existing one.

Look at that! One simple fix and you will increase revenues, decrease legal liability risk, increase customer satisfaction (and dealer's too, I'm pretty sure), and thus increase profit. So, why wait? Get the engineers on this TODAY!!

Thanks for listening. And by the way, the bike is absolutely awesome despite this serviceability item.​
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
All I can say is thank you very very much for putting together such a nice write up
 
  • Like
Reactions: skippy344! and Snas

·
Registered
Joined
·
599 Posts
I own one of the early ones & it's always been a hassle to get to. I would advise you to connect a battery tender lead to it & then you can trickle charge the battery, reducing the times that you will need to do the above. Like most things in life, it gets easier with practice !
Welcome to FJR ownership.

PS. If you are in there again, maybe check out your headlight adjustment options - mine were a fair way off ideal, but are easily adjusted once the cockpit panels are removed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Many thanks!!! Great write up and I will put it to use soon. Ordered a Powerlet for my 2013 FJR...should arrive soon! Yamaha WAKE UP!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
on the battery cover, you can cut off the tab that uses the phillips head. then you can access the battery without removing the front cowl.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
793 Posts
on the battery cover, you can cut off the tab that uses the phillips head. then you can access the battery without removing the front cowl.
Hmmmm... anyone figured out to add a hinge? (Ideally the same as the glove box would be good). :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
The most difficult part, as stated, is unsnapping the tabs on the cowling. You have to be vigorous if you grasp the bulbous parts at the bottom while trying to shake it loose. What I found to be less stressful on the tabs is to use a popsicle stick. Bevel the edges at one end to form a v-shaped point. Then you can insert it between the outer plastic and the cowling at the tab connectors and pry them loose. The popsicle stick is soft enough that it does not mar the plastic, yet strong enough to unmate the tabs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Im glad it not just me. First time was a total joke! Not rocket science but carefull not to break anthing. Just did it for a second time to install pig tail for batt tender and it went better but im still thinking of cutting an access door somehow for that dreded road side fuse etc. I like the bike but gosh guys really? Lets put some thought into this access issue?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,589 Posts
Just exactly how often do you all need to access your battery? After I put a battery tender pigtail on mine, I don't expect to see it again for years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,615 Posts
My 06' has had the battery cover off maybe 3 times since 06. Once to install the tender pigtail, once to run fuzeblock lines under the seat, and once to replace the weak OEM battery (last year).

3 times in 8 years..... not a big issue. And never blown a fuse. Not saying it couldn't happen...... but the FJR is not known as being hard on fuses (unless farkles are poorly installed).

Just sayin'..... It is what it is...... and to me, it is a great machine. Pehaps not perfect...... but we have the Germans for that kind of bike.... right? LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,589 Posts
And then there's this rather ironic statement from the very detailed and nicely illustrated op:

...Now that I've done it, I think it would take me as little as 5 minutes to do it next time - if in well lit area and have all the tools at hand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
614 Posts
That's the problem... its never at a good time or convenient place.. like the time I ran into work pealing riding gear and left the ignition on all morning...

Excellent write up. I hope the mother ship takes note.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
599 Posts
Never had a blown fuse either in 11 years of the same bike ownership. I doubt that the FJR's access is tougher than other modern bikes - it's a question of learning your own machine in case you need to access these areas in less than ideal conditions, be they weather or geography related !!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,589 Posts
...I...left the ignition on all morning...
I guess you should consider yourself lucky no one stole your bike sitting there with the key in it. And of course Yamaha should have anticipated this? :rolleyes: How much other owner induced trouble should they also design for? BTW, the battery tender comes with jumper cables that hook into the pig tail which make getting a jump start a snap.

For me it just gets a little tiresome to hear of a few situations that may have aggravated a few owners and then hear it proclaimed that it's bad design or poor engineering and MUST be changed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
793 Posts
Never had a blown fuse either in 11 years of the same bike ownership. I doubt that the FJR's access is tougher than other modern bikes - it's a question of learning your own machine in case you need to access these areas in less than ideal conditions, be they weather or geography related !!
Aye, I met a lad on a run with a new fancy Kawasaki & he has to remove the false tank to get to the battery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
BTW, the battery tender comes with jumper cables that hook into the pig tail which make getting a jump start a snap.
Are you sure that is what they are meant for?

They are provided to connect the tender to batteries using the clamps.

Jump Starting requires much more current than the fuse and 14 AWG wire is capable of handling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
417 Posts
Just exactly how often do you all need to access your battery? After I put a battery tender pigtail on mine, I don't expect to see it again for years.
Those of us living in northern climates have to remove the battery every winter, unless the bike is stored in a heated garage (mine is not). Batteries don't like -30 deg F.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
545 Posts
Talk about difficult battery access-you should try it on a 2001 BMW R1100 S- my no2 bike.
Remove seat unit.
Remove 5 screws on each fairing side panel - 10 in total including two extremely difficult to access M5 screws under the front onf the panels.
Disconnect each LH/RH indicator wiring.
Unbolt tank unit at back and sides - 6 bolts
Prop up tank unit.
Access battery.
Disconnect or whatever.
Phew!
 
1 - 20 of 59 Posts
Top