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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Bill they're both great bikes but a little bit like comparing steak to lobster ( the real lobster not the things they pass off for lobster in FL). The wind protection isn't worse it's just different. Yamaha makes a set of wind deflectors that attaches beside the dash. With those on the bike it's a nice pocket of smooth quiet air to ride in. Couldn't ask for better. In fact I never bothered with the larger touring screen on mine because it was so nice with the stock screen and side deflectors. just my opinion.
The one I looked at had those side deflectors, I wondered how much they helped.

I'm gonna pass on it for now, finish out the year on the two bikes and regroup after the first of the year I think. LIke I siad its not like I'm actually complaining about what Im riding, I'm not, Just wondering about a different tool for the Job.
 

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Versys 1000 CBF1000 VFR800
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A friend of mine brought his S10 on a month-long 8000 mile trip we went on, he had no problem keeping up in the twisties, etc. It is a more sit-up style of course, but he had the deflectors and I think stock seat. 600 lbs. still. I rode a couple and they were OK, it's a twin, so just half an inline 4 kinda thing. I prefer a four, can't see myself wanting an S10. Much like a V-Strom, you won't go true dual-sporting, just too heavy. One of the best dual sports out there is a DR650 for that stuff, and much cheaper too.
I can't see why one would want an S10 and an FJR in the stable, I'd keep the FJR over the S10 personally.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
A friend of mine brought his S10 on a month-long 8000 mile trip we went on, he had no problem keeping up in the twisties, etc. It is a more sit-up style of course, but he had the deflectors and I think stock seat. 600 lbs. still. I rode a couple and they were OK, it's a twin, so just half an inline 4 kinda thing. I prefer a four, can't see myself wanting an S10. Much like a V-Strom, you won't go true dual-sporting, just too heavy. One of the best dual sports out there is a DR650 for that stuff, and much cheaper too.
I can't see why one would want an S10 and an FJR in the stable, I'd keep the FJR over the S10 personally.
Yea I like My DR 650, But I dont like it on 5 hour rides. Yes the Super T is Heavy but Its suprising what folks do on these big heavy bikes, lots of vids of folks singletracking them through the mountains etc..I think the big hold up would be the shaft drive and inability to regear for more offroad friendliness.

For me, it would be the ability to comfotorably ride 6-10 hours away, travel down some jeep trails, find a fishing or camping spot and enjoy a weekend or something.
The DR will do that but Ill need to invest in better wind protection and really the stock suspension needs reworked once putting luggage on it, actually it needs reworked for anything over a snails pace off road. I like the Strom 1000 as well, its 70 lbs lighter I believe, but I dont like the sound of issues with the Clutch basket.
 

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I have had a Tenere for about 6 years now and I would completely recommend it for anyone looking for a tough bike capable of grinding up a steep, loose gravel double-track fire road here in CO as well as riding from here to the Trans-Labrador highway, the Dalton, or the Dempster - all of which mine has done without a single mechanical problem (flats, etc. oh yes..). I have run it on anywhere from 85 octane to 95 octane and never really noticed a difference. Not as much "oomph" in the lower octane, but it will run on it no problem.

The concern about riding such a heavy bike on dirt roads would go for any bike: if you are not comfortable riding in a situation where you might have to have help to get yourself out of it, then you probably should not be there on that bike. I see that too often here in CO with visitors from other states. After all these miles I would not take the Tenere any more in some of the places that I have seen people take these big adventure bikes, they are just not as fun as riding a much lighter bike. However, if you want to do a cross-country rides, IBA rides as well as hit the 10's of thousands of miles of dirt roads all over the western US, it is a hard to beat choice.

But to be honest (and why I am on an FJR owner's site): I am looking at an FJR as a second ride to try and coax my wife to go with me on some trips, so trying to soak up some knowledge...
 

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I have had a Tenere for about 6 years now and I would completely recommend it for anyone looking for a tough bike capable of grinding up a steep, loose gravel double-track fire road here in CO as well as riding from here to the Trans-Labrador highway, the Dalton, or the Dempster - all of which mine has done without a single mechanical problem (flats, etc. oh yes..). I have run it on anywhere from 85 octane to 95 octane and never really noticed a difference. Not as much "oomph" in the lower octane, but it will run on it no problem.

The concern about riding such a heavy bike on dirt roads would go for any bike: if you are not comfortable riding in a situation where you might have to have help to get yourself out of it, then you probably should not be there on that bike. I see that too often here in CO with visitors from other states. After all these miles I would not take the Tenere any more in some of the places that I have seen people take these big adventure bikes, they are just not as fun as riding a much lighter bike. However, if you want to do a cross-country rides, IBA rides as well as hit the 10's of thousands of miles of dirt roads all over the western US, it is a hard to beat choice.

But to be honest (and why I am on an FJR owner's site): I am looking at an FJR as a second ride to try and coax my wife to go with me on some trips, so trying to soak up some knowledge...
Im on the other side of that. I bought the fjr for long trips & cuz she likes to go once in a while. I been thinking about the tenere for logging road stuff.
 

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FJR1300 A, TMax 530 DX, Tracer GT900, XS850
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I had three FJRs (05,06,09) and decided to buy a new 2016 ES ST just for a change. I travelled all over Europe on both bikes, I don't do forest trails but did most of the alpine passes and hundreds of hairpin bends. I mostly ride one up.

In my opinion, the ST is an excellent touring bike - lighter, more upright, more nimble, more roomy and more economical than the FJR. It will go places where the FJR could not. I did the 'level the seat' mod, and fitted handlebar riser blocks and this hugely improved the bike for me. The cruise and electronic suspension were great additions. The Gen 2 bike is a better performer than the Gen 1 , leave it in S mode, give it loads of throttle and it will keep up with almost anything.

I sold it three months ago and bought a 2019 FJR. The engine on the ST has to be the most rattly engine I have ever come across. When under way and at speed it is not noticeable, but on startup and tickover especially when cold it is like a tractor. In fact if some of my old 1970 Yams sounded like that, I would be tearing the engine down. However this is normal for the ST and they are utterly unburstable with huge mileages common.

Many FJR owners move over to the ST. Apart from the agricultural engine compared with the turbine of the FJR, the Super Tenere is a great all round bike.

As neither The FJR or the Super Tenere meet Euro 5 emissions they cannot be sold in Europe after December 31st 2020 - that is why I decided to back to the FJR before they are finished.
 

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I sold it three months ago and bought a 2019 FJR. The engine on the ST has to be the most rattly engine I have ever come across. When under way and at speed it is not noticeable, but on startup and tickover especially when cold it is like a tractor. In fact if some of my old 1970 Yams sounded like that, I would be tearing the engine down. However this is normal for the ST and they are utterly unburstable with huge mileages common.
Best description I've seen...

"Refinement comparable to Soviet-era agricultural equipment".
 

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Hi There. Just last year I went in the other direction. I traded my much loved 2014 Super Tenere ES for a 2018 FJR ES. I had always liked the looks of the FJR an wanted a bike that sat a little lower and had more power on tap. After a year with the FJR as much as I love it I do miss my Super T. The riding ergonomics on the adventure bike were less cramped. My 1st couple years with the ST I rode on the requisite TKC 80's and did not like how the bike felt in the corners on the blacktop but it was a joy to stand on the pegs and navigate the dirt roads or stand and releve a achy butt. I then fitted a set of full street Pirelli Angel GT tires to the bike and boy it waz a different machine. On road performance improved drastically. It does carry its weight higher than the FJR and it is a beast to pick up off its side (dont ask!) but once underway it will put a smile on your face. Toggle it into Sport Mode and start smiling. If my budget allowed 2 bikes I would get another in a heartbeat but or now it is FJR fun only. As a side note the weight is also high in the FJR and is isn't any easier than the ST to push around the garage. Either way you get Yamaha reliability and dealer network. Ride what you love. Take Care.
 
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