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  Topic Review (Newest First)
04-13-2019 08:14 AM
passx Russ, your method is the proper one, but on slippery/slick surfaces like turning or turning around where there’s sand/gravel/water I use only the rear brake to keep from having the front push out.

The 86 GL1200 sei I had before the fjr had such well balanced linked brakes that I got into the habit of only using the rear brake pedal (bad habit) and found myself doing the same thing on my non-linked brake antique bikes. And when I first got my fjr I continued that bad habit which made me realize how poor the linked brake system works on the fjr and because you need to also use the front brakes to make the rear linked brake work well, my logic is why have it in the first place.

More complexity for the sake of complexity and probably a sales thing, it really just doesn’t work well so just get rid of it. It’s such a contrast to The otherwise very excellent brakes on the fjr. The good thing that has come out of it is that it has taught me to get back to using the brakes properly.
04-13-2019 07:45 AM
rbentnail Caveat- I have no idea of others' braking habits, I regularly use front & rear brakes together. Using one or the other is an anomaly for me.

I do know that my rear linked front brake pads wear out faster than all the others, front or rear. To me that means I am regularly utilizing my linked brakes.
04-12-2019 09:44 AM
passx I had a friend that bought a 2013-14 Yamaha Venture Royal that was killed when he panick stopped and the front tire tucked under and the bike high sided onto him crushing and killing him, ABS would’ve prevented that, although AbS is designed to only give you an average stop every time so the distances would’ve been increased. The guy’s at Yamaha that did the abs on the fjr did a great job (yes i’ve Been into abs mode multiple times,,,, freakin Illinois nazi’s) the fjr abs is nearly transparent and minimally invasive in it’s operation, they did a good job. Maybe we could get that team to design a real rear subframe.

On the “linked” brakes, the thing I don’t like about the fjr system is that if you only use the rear brake pedal the amount of force required to get any braking is unacceptably high in my opinion. That said, if you add a wee bit of front brake lever pressure the rear lever effort required to get meaningful braking is significantly reduced and ok, but w/o adding the front lever pressure it’s only barely noticeable, not real good. On my 86 gl1200 sei the linked brakes worked very well in my opinion and if linked brakes were a non-choice that’s what I would choose. But to be honest i’m not a real fan. May have to spend some time and look at removing the linked system from my bike.

I suspect that since the linked brakes only actuate 1 piston on the right front caliper it must be tipping the pad so only a corner or edge is all that’s working with only the rear pedal activation but you get more pad contact (squares the pad up) with slight activation of the front lever because only a slight amount of front lever pressure will then give substantial results from using the rear pedal.

Under normal braking the leading edge of the brake pad supplies the initial bite and subsequent braking power but if it only uses that edge and not the rest of the pads area braking is significantly reduced. Reduced area.
04-12-2019 06:53 AM
Blue Gen2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan smithy View Post
Linked ABS,
I'm all in favour of having it on all bikes, reason being I was taking a ride with my wife, a lot of the older people of our community just don't get the rules of the roundabout. I had entered the roundabout , I saw the 4X4 coming, on my left but it was about 50mtrs away from entering the roundabout, the old guy driving didn't even slow down, to enter, came straight on, if it wasn't for that unified ABS braking me and my wife would have gone under his 4X4. I had total control of the bike under heavy braking , if I had the old style brakes and locked the brakes up while cornering , I would have lost control of the bike, and would not be here to tell the tale.
Are you sure? Have you survived situations of that nature before, without abs? I have.

It's true - abs is a good idea - most of the time. It comes in on patches of gravel or ice. But I have found locking the brakes on dry pavement to be difficult, even when intentionally done.

Is having a machine that refuses your commands a good idea? Methinks not...

The thing, of course, is not to get into those situations And we all try not to do that.

Nothing's perfect. Maybe I'm just an old geezer who had no problems with the way things were and would, at least, like to have a choice. But it is what it is and bitching about it won't change it.
04-11-2019 09:15 AM
Alan smithy Linked ABS,
I'm all in favour of having it on all bikes, reason being I was taking a ride with my wife, a lot of the older people of our community just don't get the rules of the roundabout. I had entered the roundabout , I saw the 4X4 coming, on my left but it was about 50mtrs away from entering the roundabout, the old guy driving didn't even slow down, to enter, came straight on, if it wasn't for that unified ABS braking me and my wife would have gone under his 4X4. I had total control of the bike under heavy braking , if I had the old style brakes and locked the brakes up while cornering , I would have lost control of the bike, and would not be here to tell the tale.
04-11-2019 06:48 AM
RaYzerman Technically, you'd lose a good percentage of braking in a panic situation. The FJR system is minimal linked, I don't quite understand the complaint, what does it hurt? If you want to experience what true linked brakes are, ride a Honda ST or a Goldwing.
04-11-2019 06:31 AM
Blue Gen2
Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesW View Post
I'm not nuts about linked brakes either having owned an '04 R1150RT. Why couldn't you just disconnect the brake line that provides the link to the right front brake assembly? Plug the disconnected ports of course.
After being told to go and read the owners manual maybe I should not post anymore. I have been dismissed, after all...

But there is one word in your post - "WHY"

A machine is, by definition (in my mind, at least) something that does the bidding of a person. But now, it seems, our roles are being reversed. Now the machines are so kind as to guide us, and prevent us from going astray...

Never have I come so close to being killed in a car as I was one day when I was in a hurry, and decided to quickly get out into the road. Thing was, there was a little gravel there. One of the wheels slipped on it and Big Brother the Computer cut the engine, making use of the "fly by wire" throttle. Result? I'm dead in the water with a semi truck bearing down on me.

I sold that toyota the very next week. Now I am very careful about what I buy. I look for solid wire to the throttle.

There is no simple, universal rule for braking, or anything else. There are scenarios that require locking the brakes. If the machine refuses, you DIE. Maybe you are about to rear end a semi trailer. In desperation, you choose to lay her down and try to slide under it. The wheels, being giant gyroscopes, will not allow the bike to go over if they are spinning so you lock the rear wheel, using the brake. You get my point?

I'm not the world's maximum notorcycle rider - far, far from it - but I have managed to ride since the 60s without the "help" of any system that negates my control of the machine.
04-11-2019 12:58 AM
JamesW I'm not nuts about linked brakes either having owned an '04 R1150RT. Why couldn't you just disconnect the brake line that provides the link to the right front brake assembly? Plug the disconnected ports of course.
04-10-2019 09:44 PM
passx Ferret, I agree! Even though I’ve had trouble with the abs on my 14a (bad switch’s, sorry Russ, not neglect) I did all the suggestions made here to no avail, bled the brakes and all. Cleaning the wheel speed sensors had some beneficial effects with a slightly longer duration between the fault lights but the only thing that fixed it was new switch(s).


Even with the trouble I still prefer a bike with an ABS system and as someone who worked in brake engineering for nearly 30yrs i’ll say that the fjr is equipped with one of the very best i’ve experienced, it works very well indeed.

I will add that i’m Not a linked brake fan though, the fjr’s system ain’t great in that respect.
04-09-2019 12:15 PM
the Ferret I would buy a bike that didn't have ABS (and did in 2013) but I would prefer ABS like my last 2 have had. I would rather have bikes without combined braking than without ABS.
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