OEM Brake Pads - Page 3 - Yamaha FJR Forum : Yamaha FJR Owners Forums
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post #21 of 30 (permalink) Old 06-26-2020, 08:14 PM
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Russ, I intended that for the general masses..... most don't research that kind of thing like you and I might, and some stuff is hard to find.... default to the specific product for the application in that case.
You might remember back in the earlier days of FJR life, there were many who posted get the Mobil 1 synthetic red stuff, it's the best. I've had this 1 lb. can partly used around for several years.... it's temperature range is -40-302F and is hardly suitable as brake temperatures can get hotter than that. So, safer to tell everybody to use the silicone brake grease if you see what I mean.

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post #22 of 30 (permalink) Old 06-26-2020, 10:01 PM
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You are both right, It seems they are both good for up to (only) 500 deg F

Waterproof Green Grease is a professional grade, high performance synthetic polymer grease developed for mining, manufacturing, marine and off-road applications. Recommended for cars, trucks, boats, trailers, ATV's, motorcycles, mowers, farm equipment and implements - any application up to 500 degrees Fahrenheit.

VS

Yamaha Brake caliper grease ACC-SLCNG-RS-00. Synthetic silicone grease can be used for brake caliper lubrication, electrical insulation (dielectric), damping, and lubrication of brass components and O-rings. Withstands temperatures to 500įF. Product should be used where Grease S is specified in the service manual.

P.S. During normal street use, brake rotors and pads normally won't see temperatures climb past 200 degrees Celsius, or 392 degrees Fahrenheit. However, track days are a different story, with temperatures potentially reaching 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit as the brakes are called upon more often and more aggressively. For track days recommended Permatex 24125 Ceramic Extreme The 100% synthetic formula of Permatex 24125 Ceramic Extreme (appx. $13) contains ceramic solids in its mixture, drastically increasing its maximum operating temperature to 3,000˚F.




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post #23 of 30 (permalink) Old 06-27-2020, 12:31 AM
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I like https://www.schaefferoil.com/ultra-red-grease.html and https://www.schaefferoil.com/ployurea-grease.html. The second one has a "drop temperature" of 525*F.

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post #24 of 30 (permalink) Old 06-27-2020, 07:51 AM
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I’ll add that the topic of brake grease is a “hot” one��, having worked in engineering at one of the major brake suppliers for nearly 30yrs the brake grease thing is a tuff nut to crack. We had all kinds of samples from grease suppliers vieing to be “the” supplier.

There is no magic grease that does it all, it just doesn’t exist, the main thing is to clean and LIGHTLY grease the moving parts but every grease I seen used/tested would eventually wash out or just evaporate with time, it’s a really tuff job. I’ll add that imho probably/maybe the best grease I ever seen used is this stuff they called “smurf” grease because it is the same blue as a smurf but it wasn’t the end all grease either.

Unfortunately I cannot remember the name or maker of it, I did get a couple of small sample cups of it which will probably/maybe last me until I’m no longer here. I’ve never seen it for sale any where. But again I’ll say that it’s most important that that you clean & lightly lube the sliding parts at regular intervals.

I have used anti-seize (both types) as well which will make the engineers that were responsible for this kind of thing just cringe as they’ll just scream not to use that but again careful lightly lubing things has worked well for me. My .02

One last thing I’ll add is that after Phil’s statements about using oiled up used Brake pads is just don’t do that, it’s dangerous for causing reduced braking to premature lockup. Also avoid touching the pad material with your hands as the oil from you skin will have negative effects, I always spray my pads off with brake clean prior to final install to get any potential contaminants off, it all affects the pad life and performance.

Brake pads,,, it used to be and generally is on a car that you’ll use 2 front sets to 1 rear set Because automotive is usually 70-75% front braking, but that’s pretty general. A bike is different since the front & rear systems are generally separate. Myself I generally wear the rears out at a 2-1 rate to the front as for normal light braking I find myself only using the rears, purely subconsciously. Heavier braking, I lean more on the fronts, just my habit. But keep in mind usually there is only 1/2 the area of pad material at the rears due to only I set of pads vs 2 on the fronts and the designers use the 70-75% braking front with 25-30% rear for setup. I’m going back to sleep now!
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post #25 of 30 (permalink) Old 06-27-2020, 08:00 AM
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I donít mind using OEM pad, and, in fact, thatís whatís on the bike right now. But I find EBC HH to last longer, brake at least as well, and they donít produce any discernible wear to the rotors. At least not over my ownership. I use whichever is more readily available, but prefer the EBC.
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post #26 of 30 (permalink) Old 06-27-2020, 04:29 PM
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My OE rear lasted 40,000, EBC 20,000.

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post #27 of 30 (permalink) Old 06-27-2020, 05:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Bernie View Post
My rear pads always wear out 3 to 5 times faster than front pads. I always use OEM pads, they brake better, last longer, don't carve huge grooves in the brake discs, and don't squeal. They're also better made, in the past I have had after market pads that were too thick, or the metal backing plate was so roughly made that they jammed in the caliper, and I had to file the excess metal off.

Did I read that right> you are going through REAR pads 3 times faster than FRONT pad?
The front does 70-80% o braking ( or 100% when you dont touch the rear)
Do you have dragging Rear Calipers? Or are you for some reason NOT lying the front brakes rd enough?

I just came back from a trip around MT Rainier and doubt I hit the rear brake 10 times
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post #28 of 30 (permalink) Old 06-27-2020, 05:27 PM
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It does what you tell it to do. If you use the rear brake a lot for tight maneuvers, or on gravel or dirt, itís going to wear faster than the front.

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post #29 of 30 (permalink) Old 06-27-2020, 06:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Way8lifter View Post
Did I read that right> you are going through REAR pads 3 times faster than FRONT pad?
The front does 70-80% o braking ( or 100% when you dont touch the rear)
Do you have dragging Rear Calipers? Or are you for some reason NOT lying the front brakes rd enough?

I just came back from a trip around MT Rainier and doubt I hit the rear brake 10 times
Don't forget that the brakes are linked. If you don't touch the back brake, then you will only get 75% of the power of the front brakes. To get full power from the front brakes, you must also operate the rear brakes to bring in the forth piston at the front.

And of course, if you are riding gently, as in traffic, then the back in conjunction with the linked front brake, gives you adequate braking power.

And no, my brakes are not dragging, I maintain them often.
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post #30 of 30 (permalink) Old 06-27-2020, 08:16 PM
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Don't forget that the brakes are linked. If you don't touch the back brake, then you will only get 75% of the power of the front brakes. To get full power from the front brakes, you must also operate the rear brakes to bring in the forth piston at the front.

And of course, if you are riding gently, as in traffic, then the back in conjunction with the linked front brake, gives you adequate braking power.

And no, my brakes are not dragging, I maintain them often.
Yes I do realize they are linked .. But right now I am wait for some pads in the mail ( got the bike a week ago ) ..but unless I feel extra motivated many times I just use the rears on my bikes ..But I do think at parking lot speed you are MUCH less likely to dump the bike if you use the rear vs the front ..creates a smoother stop and if you hit a rock or sand or other debris the front wont drop out
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