OEM Brake Pads - Page 2 - Yamaha FJR Forum : Yamaha FJR Owners Forums
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post #11 of 30 (permalink) Old 05-23-2020, 09:38 AM
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I am at 29,000 mine on mine. Had them examined at 23,00 when I had tires replaced and mechanic said there was a lot left. Will have them examined again at 30,000 when I am having the brake and clutch fluid changed, spark plugs, air cleaner etc.
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post #12 of 30 (permalink) Old 05-24-2020, 09:13 AM
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We're all going to have differing mileages on brake pads, very simply a heavy brake user will wear them out faster.... but when it comes time to replace I'd recommend a thorough cleaning of the pistons and other parts with brake dust accumulation.
To extend the pistons safely, remove caliper and leave the brake pads in place, squeeze your lever or pedal to push the pads together (no rotor) and the pistons will expose themselves, remove pads, clean with brake fluid and a toothbrush, once happy your caliper is clean, rinse everything with isopopanol to get rid of oily residues. Slip the pads back in and pry the pistons back, if this is the time for new pads, you'll need the pistons fully back.
I wouldn't use brake cleaner, as harsh solvents can harden the seals, not a big deal, but again, rinse with isopropanol if you do that.
If not done before, clean and re-grease the slides with hi-temp silicone brake grease and clean off any excess that may be on the rubber boot. I just clean the pad pins and leave them dry, theory being I don't like to attract brake dust. Some grease them, not wrong, just at tire change time, maybe take them out, clean them again... you want the sliding parts to all move freely as the caliper floats to keep it centered on the rotors.
If you feel any pulsing, might not be sliding freely, but also the rotor rivets may be crudded up a bit keeping them from floating as well... insert a dowel or other tool, rotate them to loosen up any accumulated crud, brake cleaner as a "pressure wash" if you like. If you can take the rotor and rotate it a bit forward and back, then your rivets are floating.... some may notice a "click" for a bit while riding and applying the brakes, all normal, that will die off as crud again starts to build.
All of this will help your pads wear as evenly as they can. That said, some find one pad in a pair may wear a little faster than the other, just means the caliper wasn't floating evenly, and I suspect from my experience there is a bit of a design thing involved as well, so don't sweat it too much if it's minor in wear difference.

Ray
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post #13 of 30 (permalink) Old 05-24-2020, 09:29 AM
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Phil, just sayin here but using oiled up brake pads is a really bad idea, once they’ve been exposed to fork oil for a little while you cannot get it out of the pad no matter how much brake clean you use. The oil WILL glaze up on the pads & rotors and when you really need to stop the braking power will be very reduced, adding the heat from a hard stop will only make it worse........ being cheap is fine but how much do you value your life ?

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post #14 of 30 (permalink) Old 05-26-2020, 10:17 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RaYzerman View Post
We're all going to have differing mileages on brake pads, very simply a heavy brake user will wear them out faster.... but when it comes time to replace I'd recommend a thorough cleaning of the pistons and other parts with brake dust accumulation.
To extend the pistons safely, remove caliper and leave the brake pads in place, squeeze your lever or pedal to push the pads together (no rotor) and the pistons will expose themselves, remove pads, clean with brake fluid and a toothbrush, once happy your caliper is clean, rinse everything with isopopanol to get rid of oily residues. Slip the pads back in and pry the pistons back, if this is the time for new pads, you'll need the pistons fully back.
I wouldn't use brake cleaner, as harsh solvents can harden the seals, not a big deal, but again, rinse with isopropanol if you do that..........
All of this will help your pads wear as evenly as they can. That said, some find one pad in a pair may wear a little faster than the other, just means the caliper wasn't floating evenly, and I suspect from my experience there is a bit of a design thing involved as well, so don't sweat it too much if it's minor in wear difference.
Great info! I printed this post out and stuck in my shop manual for when I finally get around to servicing my brakes!

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post #15 of 30 (permalink) Old 05-26-2020, 10:30 AM
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To get by in a pinch (say fork oil leak on the road), spray/wipe with brake cleaner or isopropanol, or better yet, get the pads out and soak them... but for 100% good braking, get some new pads.
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Ray
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post #16 of 30 (permalink) Old 05-28-2020, 06:27 AM
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Yamaha does make a special brake pin grease which I use very lightly whenever servicing my brakes. It's pricey though.
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post #17 of 30 (permalink) Old 05-28-2020, 10:34 AM
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Yamaha does make a special brake pin grease which I use very lightly whenever servicing my brakes. It's pricey though.
I use marine grade wheel bearing grease, just a little. Doesn't wash out easily.

Russ
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post #18 of 30 (permalink) Old 06-26-2020, 08:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mattemike View Post
Yamaha does make a special brake pin grease which I use very lightly whenever servicing my brakes. It's pricey though.
I use marine grade wheel bearing grease, just a little. Doesn't wash out easily.
I do the same thing. I use the green marine grease. It’s a pita just like anti-seize is to use, but that green grease is what I’ve been using on my off-roader Jeep since I started using it in 2003. Stays on and lasts a long time, and I don’t go through universals like I was. My waterline is almost 40” so transmission, axles, usually under water a lot when I go to my local play place.
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post #19 of 30 (permalink) Old 06-26-2020, 12:46 PM
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On brake parts, you are better off using high temp silicone brake grease... won't wash off easily at all and won't melt if things get hot.

Ray
Keep yer stick on the ice....
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post #20 of 30 (permalink) Old 06-26-2020, 05:13 PM
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On brake parts, you are better off using high temp silicone brake grease... won't wash off easily at all and won't melt if things get hot.
I respectfully disagree, I'm not "better off". I've never had a problem with using marine grade waterproof high temperature wheel bearing grease sparingly on any vehicle brake components. It's waterproof- very difficult to wash off. It's high temp wheel bearing grease- stands up to very high temps. Aluminum will melt before this stuff liquefies. And it's extreme pressure- will not squeeze out.

Granted, it's not widely known that superior products like this exist but they are out there. Even plain synthetic high temp, extreme pressure greases are IMHO significantly "better" than the generic purple packaged stuff from an generic auto parts place.

Russ
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