As it turns out I'm just not a very good friend to FJRs. - Page 4 - Yamaha FJR Forum : Yamaha FJR Owners Forums
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post #31 of 42 (permalink) Old 07-10-2020, 10:34 PM
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I've fixed a lot more damage on my current bike. There are always odds and ends, but most of the parts can be ordered and received, prior to taking anything apart. But given your explanation of the payout circumstance and desire for newer replacement, I understand the decision not to repair.



Take no offense to hANNAbONE Aran. As motorcycle riders, regardless of who's right and who's wrong, regardless of whether or not it was truly avoidable, we naturally have to look at it as "our fault" and assume "avoidable" (even when it isn't) because we're *always* the ones that really loose. It's certainly true that everything is not our fault, and also true that not everything is avoidable, but because we loose EVERY time... and often big... we have to take the attitude that "I could've done something different." So we mean no offense... it's just the attitude that we take.



Had someone turn in front of me a few years ago. Caught their rear quarter-panel and they kept going. Still, I looked at it as "my fault". I could've braked harder... way harder. I could've been looking at oncoming traffic through the stopped minivan's windows. I could've accelerated slower. I could've also paid more attention to and anticipated the *potential* actions of an oncoming driver. Even if it wasn't my fault, I still *must* take the attitude that it was avoidable. (I really do believe it was.)



The lesson I take from your rear-ender is, be better prepared to bail if there's otherwise no way out. Problem is, those cars come *fast* and my R6 has a small mirror. My rear brake lit is high, and flashes on initial press. It also flashes at random periods while braked. It actually came with a capacitor kit to stop this, but I've intentionally not installed this and consider that "malfunction" as added safety.
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post #32 of 42 (permalink) Old 07-11-2020, 04:38 AM Thread Starter
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As far as I see it there was no option. If I buy back the bike it gets a salvage title, which means I need to repair it to 100% to pass a Rebuilt title inspection, my insurance rate will go up because it's an R title, and I will never, ever, be able to sell it for anything approaching reasonable, even if I baby it for the rest of the time I own it.


Once it's salvage, it isn't worthwhile. Let someone else take it on if that's their prerogative. Or let someone else get all the good parts off it for their non-salvage bike, it's just the left side plastics, exhaust, and nose cone cowl. And for that matter, the exhaust was just scraped, still usable if they don't mind the look. I don't have the garage space to part it out either, I just bought several thousand square feet of OSB and vinyl flooring to redo my house and between my workbench, shelves, the kayaks, and the two Ninja 250s in the garage (One non-running, one no title, the titleless one is going to be donor parts for the one that decided it was done running) there just isn't room for anything else.


And with my shoulder and knee feeling like they just got steamrolled, there won't be much space being made for at least a few weeks, my wife is SO happy at the new delay on the renovation work.
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post #33 of 42 (permalink) Old 07-11-2020, 08:32 AM
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You mean the two FJR incidents I posted over on Facebook? Not a whole lot I could have changed with either except "Disregard rules of the road and do what feels safest in the situation regardless of legal outcome."
Nope. Posted in this thread. I have a problem tracking different people across different platforms (often with different handles).

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When I got rear-ended, I was stopped in a line of traffic behind a stopped city bus dropping off passengers, the guy was texting and just nailed me from behind without even seeing me, it was a solid straight on hit that knocked the bike out from under me and I ended up bouncing off his hood and dropping to the ground in front of his car, fortunately he braked just as he hit me or I'd have gone under. The only real solution would have been given the whole line of traffic the finger and blown past them on the double yellow. The second one where a woman decided to just turn left without a signal when I was already in the middle of the intersection, the only real change there would have been to run the red instead of waiting for green and going whenever *I* felt safe, not when it was legal to. She made zero indication she was about to turn, it just happened to time right that I didn't clear the intersection first and instead she got out in front of me and there was a collision.
Thanks for that.

I was asking about personal take-aways that you'd do differently. Say, when stopped, leaving extra room between you and the vehicle you're behind, in gear, and head on a swivel; ready to move out of your spot when you track that approaching vehicle on your 6. You know... things you reflect on personally when there's no ego to defend in front of others.

I didn't mean to get you to post that stuff here (or anywhere); just reflecting on how (regardless of markings on a road) to avoid getting killed. Some of your follow-up posts seem (hard to tell with text) some emotional investment in public defense of your skill set. I don't think anyone intended that. It's the critical, personal (and internal) self-evaluation that keeps you alive.

Example: The 1980's Hurt Report identified that the large majority of multi-vehicle bike wrecks come from the front and most of those are from people turning in front of the rider. Since then those numbers haven't changed. With that info, how do you enter an intersection? Some wait for cages to move first from a traffic control and let those cages run "blocker" for you through the intersection. That's just one example of street-strategies shared with students at most rider training courses (at least in the more experienced ones).

I don't know your history but always-training/always-learning is a good way for riders to (continue to) learn-and-live.

Said better than I have:

Quote:
Take no offense to hANNAbONE Aran. As motorcycle riders, regardless of who's right and who's wrong, regardless of whether or not it was truly avoidable, we naturally have to look at it as "our fault" and assume "avoidable" (even when it isn't) because we're *always* the ones that really loose. It's certainly true that everything is not our fault, and also true that not everything is avoidable, but because we loose EVERY time... and often big... we have to take the attitude that "I could've done something different." So we mean no offense... it's just the attitude that we take.

Ridden wet. Put up hard.

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Last edited by bounce; 07-11-2020 at 08:44 AM.
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post #34 of 42 (permalink) Old 07-11-2020, 12:00 PM
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Nope. Posted in this thread. I have a problem tracking different people across different platforms (often with different handles).
I was asking about personal take-aways that you'd do differently. Say, when stopped, leaving extra room between you and the vehicle you're behind, in gear, and head on a swivel; ready to move out of your spot when you track that approaching vehicle on your 6. You know... things you reflect on personally when there's no ego to defend in front of others.
Bounce hits the nail on the head with this point. If it means anything, I am a Canada Safety Council (CSC) certified Chief Motorcycle Riding Instructor. I've been riding for going on 37 years and teaching and licensing riders for 19 years. One of the exercises we do in the Gearing Up program is emergency braking and collision avoidance. Before we even talk to the students about how to brake or swerve in an emergency, we discuss what needs to be done to avoid those situations in the first place. There are three (3) things that, regardless of who is at fault, are factors that are within the rider's control: Inattentiveness, Following Too Closely, and Speed.

Inattentiveness: When you cross through an intersection, do you do a traffic check on your approach? This shouldn't matter whether it's a through-intersection where traffic on your left and right has a stop sign or you're going through a green light. Do you check your mirrors after you crossed through the intersection? The situation behind you is likely to change after you've gone through an intersection. When at a stop in traffic, whether you're waiting at a light or traffic is just backed up, how frequently do you check your mirrors? When you are just riding along in traffic, how frequently do you check your surroundings and your mirrors? We run an M2Exit course which is a road test for riders getting their full M license. On that course we teach that riders should be checking their mirrors every 10 seconds in residential and commercial areas and every 5 seconds when riding on an expressway. Seems like a lot, but there is a lot going on and you need to be aware. And even when stopped in traffic, you need to be checking your mirrors regularly. This is also why we teach The Ready Position - whenever possible, stop with your left foot down, right foot on the brake, right hand on the throttle, and left hand on the clutch with the bike in first gear. That is the best way to ensure that you're ready to go. I see too many motorcyclists who stop at intersections with both feet down, no brake applied, and the bike in neutral. That's a recipe for disaster.

Following Too Closely: The best thing a rider can do is put time between them and other traffic. Distance equals time. When riding along you should always maintain at least a 2-second gap between you and the vehicle in front of you whenever possible. This gives you time to brake or swerve if/when required. Increase that gap if you're about to go through an intersection as oncoming vehicles may not be able to see you if you're too close to the vehicle in front of you. Always make sure you have a good forward view of the situation ahead of you. Distance also matters when you're stopped in traffic. Always, always, always make sure you have an escape route. That means at least a bike length between you and the vehicle in front of you. Also, when riding along on a multi-lane road, stay out of the blind spots of the vehicles to your left and right. Maintain a space cushion between you and all vehicles.

Speed: This doesn't just apply to riding faster than the posted limit. It's about riding the appropriate speed for the situation. I like to ride at a "spirited pace" and have been known to scrape a foot peg now and again. That being said, there is a time and place for everything. If you are stitching through traffic at 30 km/h faster than the other vehicles around you, those other drivers and riders won't expect you and don't be surprised when someone pulls out in front of you because they didn't see you. Speed equals time. Almost 20 years ago I was riding in the Allegheny National Forest with two buddies. We were having a nice afternoon ride when we came upon a road where the asphalt was in questionable condition. I struggled to make it around a pothole infested curve - my two buddies were not so lucky. The one right behind me ran his bike into the ditch and the third rider dropped his bike on the shoulder and broke his wrist pretty badly. We were not exceeding the posted limit but we were definitely riding faster than conditions warranted. A rider needs to assess the situation continuously and adjust their riding accordingly.

My final recommendation is for continuous learning. Forums like this are great for learning riding tips and there are many great books out there. One of my favourites is Proficient Motorcycling (I and II) by David Hough because it gets right to the basics but there are many other great books. I can't stress enough how important and valuable it is to take an advanced rider training course. I don't care how long you've been riding, there is always room to improve your skills and no better way to do it than on a parking lot or track with a professional instructor providing feedback. I took Advanced Rider Training https://advancedridertraining.com/ last year, a one-evening classroom and two-day parking lot course run by Sgt. Ryan Austin and it was money well spent. We were going to run all of our 35 instructors through it this summer but COVID-19 put a hold on that. Hoping to do it next year. I will definitely take his course and others like it in the future. If you measure your riding career in decades and think you've learned all you can about riding, I hate to break the news to you but you're not as good as you think you are.


That does it for now. This post was intended for the benefit of the entire group. Stay safe out there, everyone!

Zwartie
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post #35 of 42 (permalink) Old 07-12-2020, 04:19 AM Thread Starter
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Nope. Posted in this thread. I have a problem tracking different people across different platforms (often with different handles).
Apparently I don't even track my own posts across different platforms, I forgot what I'd posted here already.






And the 2013 I was eyeing sold yesterday, argh. Should have called them and put money down on it instead of waiting for the check to come in, I could have sent them a 10% down or whatever they'd have wanted to hold it for a few days.

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post #36 of 42 (permalink) Old 07-12-2020, 07:02 AM
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There is always a deal out there somewhere......

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post #37 of 42 (permalink) Old 07-12-2020, 10:53 AM
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........ the 2013 I was eyeing sold yesterday, argh. ..............
Sent a PM. A coworker's Dad is selling the same year FJR-1300A.

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post #38 of 42 (permalink) Old 07-12-2020, 11:31 AM Thread Starter
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There is always a deal out there somewhere......



Yeah, I know, that one was just really nice and really conveniently located.




SRK Cycles, the Bikes & Beards guys, have a 2014 but it's kind of beat up for what they want for it or I'd love to go out and meet them and buy a bike from them

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post #39 of 42 (permalink) Old 07-12-2020, 06:31 PM
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I have a 2013 FJR for sale. It has 37,000+ miles and has always been garaged. I will throw in a tank bag and a tail bag with the deal. It has a Rickís custom seat, mirror extensions, handle bar risers, safety tail lights, a ball mount on the steering nut, TPMS, an auxiliary power bar under the seat, driving lights, and a tourtech bag mount. All this for $7,250. You can reach me at ď[email protected]ď. I am located in Lacey, WA. I have developed Parkinsonís Disease and froze while turning last week so I am giving up riding.
I havenít figured out how to post pictures but can email them anytime.

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post #40 of 42 (permalink) Old 07-12-2020, 07:10 PM
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My insurance company reimbursed me $5K for my now deceased 2005 FJR1300. And I pulled the GIVI V56 top trunk and other accessories off of the bike to sell. Get good insurance:



They treated me right!

As to injuries, unlike Aran, in pushing the bike away to minimize my bodily damage, I fractured my own index finger and a few right ankle bones. Two quick surgeries, some plates and screws and now in a walking boot. Hoping to get back on the bike in 30-45 days.

What I learned, we have no real protection - so ride accordingly.

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