Motorcycle dryers YES or NO - Page 6 - Yamaha FJR Forum : Yamaha FJR Owners Forums
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post #51 of 58 (permalink) Old 07-10-2020, 12:32 PM
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Well, one does have to compensate for "shrinkage".... back in my teens, we would snowmobile on trails for a couple+ hours, come back to my friend's cottage... wood-fired converted woodshed sauna we had "pre-fired" before we left. Your body temp goes way up in 200F heat/humidity. Felt awesome buzzing around the 10 acre field in the frosty moonlight with nothing on but a pair of boots (in case you machine died).

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post #52 of 58 (permalink) Old 07-10-2020, 02:49 PM
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Wash, rinse and dry all in the same direction the bike is designed............from front to back.
Let it drip dry. If you have lots of minerals in your water, I get it. Okay to take your leaf blower, but only apply air in direction of front to back!!!
Then with a soft microfiber towel, wipe the remaining painted surfaces clean of water marks. Works great!
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post #53 of 58 (permalink) Old 07-10-2020, 03:31 PM
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Originally Posted by RaYzerman View Post
Well, one does have to compensate for "shrinkage".... back in my teens, we would snowmobile on trails for a couple+ hours, come back to my friend's cottage... wood-fired converted woodshed sauna we had "pre-fired" before we left. Your body temp goes way up in 200F heat/humidity. Felt awesome buzzing around the 10 acre field in the frosty moonlight with nothing on but a pair of boots (in case you machine died).
That's awesome. Sounds like fun. Lol
I have very limited time on sleds. My uncle had an artic cat 550 I used to blast around on in an old natural gas field up near Erie PA. That thing moved.
Then one day after a bunch of snow, I accidentally hit an old well pad under the snow at like 50mph and it shot me off like a Batman ejector seat, and the sled veered straight towards the river. Lol
There was literally one tree by the river and it hit it..... luckily not hard. That tree was the difference between a bent ski and total disaster.
I was maybe 19?
Him and my aunt do poker runs and camping excursions up in NY and Canada. I always wanted to do that.
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post #54 of 58 (permalink) Old 07-10-2020, 04:17 PM
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I use the Metrovac Air Force Blaster Sidekick. Works great and takes up barely any space.
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post #55 of 58 (permalink) Old 07-14-2020, 10:38 PM
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Been using a compressed air nozzle to get any standing water out of everything. No issues.

I also put the bike on the center stand and tip it left and right to get the water out that settles in the bottom belly pan.
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post #56 of 58 (permalink) Old 07-17-2020, 12:20 PM
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Water is a very poor conductor, especially of 12 VDC. Most switches and connectors on motorcycles are not hermetically sealed. No way is water going to cause lights to briefly flash either.
Issue isn't one of shorting, but instead, accelerated corrosion on the conducting surfaces of the switches' contacts. At some point I've had trouble out of every switch on my YZF, except the high-beam and starter switches. For the horn, turn-sig, ignition and kill, I've found that lubing them in silicon spray, then rapidly operating them "resolves" the issue. I've had to periodically repeat the treatment for the turn-sig switch. (the thick contaminated OEM silicon grease inside gets too thick when cold) I disconnected the battery negative before rapidly cycling the ignition switch. The spray cleared-out a bunch of old graphite and unblocked its drain hole. I replaced the key and added a *tiny* bit of graphite back afterward.

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post #57 of 58 (permalink) Old 07-17-2020, 12:43 PM
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Issue isn't one of shorting, but instead, accelerated corrosion on the conducting surfaces of the switches' contacts. At some point I've had trouble out of every switch on my YZF, except the high-beam and starter switches. For the horn, turn-sig, ignition and kill, I've found that lubing them in silicon spray, then rapidly operating them "resolves" the issue. I've had to periodically repeat the treatment for the turn-sig switch. (the thick contaminated OEM silicon grease inside gets too thick when cold) I disconnected the battery negative before rapidly cycling the ignition switch. The spray cleared-out a bunch of old graphite and unblocked its drain hole. I replaced the key and added a *tiny* bit of graphite back afterward.
That's why I don't use graphite in locks. Over time, graphite accumulates and gums it up unless you first wash the old graphite out. A locksmith told me a long time ago that graphite will gum up a lock and to use either silicone or Teflon lubricant. The carrier/solvent will clean the lock and the silicone or Teflon will keep it lubed without attracting dust.
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post #58 of 58 (permalink) Old 07-17-2020, 12:48 PM
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That's why I don't use graphite in locks. A locksmith told me a long time ago that graphite will gum up a lock. Use a silicone lubricant.
I believe that's only because people use too much... way too much. Just a *tiny* tiny bit, is all that is required. Silicon in my experience, was far too temporary to be an effective option. silicon grease would collect too much debris, I think. As implied prior, it does seem to be good for cleaning out old graphite.

Stock 2008 Yamaha YZF-R6S Blue >60k miles
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