FJR to Gold Wing - Page 2 - Yamaha FJR Forum : Yamaha FJR Owners Forums
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post #11 of 110 (permalink) Old 10-25-2019, 04:37 PM
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Originally Posted by kej1953 View Post
Mopheadama, I agree with all you said. The flat footing is key to me, not so much alone but when my wife is on back. Getting older like I am
makes it more of an issue. There arenít many used new model gold wings for sale that Iíve seen at a good price. However there is quite a few left overs at reduced prices. I have only ridden the DCT model for about 50 miles. Not really enough, but I did like it. Still not sure if itís the right choice. Thanks for your input.

Looking at your signature I might guess the 1953 is year born? If so that makes us the same age and if you have the Mrs on the back (I don't) then that sort of makes the both feet on the ground thing even more important.

We don't bounce like we use to!
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post #12 of 110 (permalink) Old 10-25-2019, 08:31 PM
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He wanted to know the market value of his FJR, didn't ask for our opinions and bike choices. He has probably already visited his inner self and decided what he wants. My friend and I both owned Yamaha's biggest cruiser they made and we both got different bikes because of the weight and maneuverability, I changed to the FJR and he changed to the Wing, and we are both as happy as a couple of jackasses in clover.
I've been on car and motorcycle forums multiple times daily for 18 years. It just works this way. Anything that gets posted is fair game for being commented on

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post #13 of 110 (permalink) Old 10-26-2019, 12:28 AM Thread Starter
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I've read on forums for years about the top heaviness of the FJR. I put 44,000 miles on my 2006 FJR and am now at 15,000 on my 2017 (in just ten months). I've never felt like it is top heavy. It's just heavy. To me it feels a lot less top heavy than the two 1600 BMWs I had. I have also had an ST1300 and Concours 14 and it does not feel any more top heavy than they did.

I had two Goldwings. I agree that due to the opposed engine they have a lower center of gravity, but they are still heavier to move around, but do have the benefit of reverse. Good luck with whatever you do.
Youíre right on the money. Iíve had an ST1300 and ridden the 1600 BMW. Next to them the FJR is noticeably lighter. My problem is a bad shoulder coupled with my advanced age which makes the higher CG of thr FJR a bigger issue. I know the Wing may not be the answer, but I am not a cruiser type of rider. I still want to ride as long as I can however. A lot of that riding is two up with the wife which is why Iím leaning towards the Wing. Thanks for your input, I appreciate it.
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post #14 of 110 (permalink) Old 10-26-2019, 12:33 AM
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Mopheadama,

I have to respectfully disagree. I've been a licensed rider for 36 years and a Canada Safety Council motorcycle riding instructor for 18 years. We tell our students time and time again that it is a myth that one needs to be able to get both feet flat on the ground when you straddle the bike. At 5'8" and a 30" inseam there would be a whole lot of motorcycles off my list if I had to follow that rule. I have an '06 FJR with a Seth Laam seat and cannot touch flat footed when sitting on the bike - It's close, but not flat footed. I ride two-up with my wife regularly and that includes multi-day rides with the bike fully loaded (heavy). How do I do it, you ask? I stop in the Ready Position 90+ percent of the time. That means left foot down, right foot on the brake, clutch pulled in, and right hand on the throttle so I'm ready to go, just as the name suggests. We teach this method to our students as best practice and it really is that. I've seen too many students who like to stop with both feet down, then when they start to move off from a stop if for some reason they need to come to a quick stop before they get their feet up on the pegs they have all their weight on the seat and only one brake to do the stopping - the front brake. This is particularly hazardous when making a turn at an intersection if at the last second a pedestrian, E-bike, skateboarder, or whatever decides to step, jump, run, or ride out in front of you. Front brake only on a slow turn at an intersection is a recipe for disaster. The ready position also allows the rider to "scooch" their butt over so they can get their left foot flat on the ground supporting the bike. Yes, sometimes the rider may need to put their right foot down instead if there is a pot hole, or the road surface is uneven but again, most of the time they should be able to stop with their left foot down. What I find with many "experienced" riders and most often with cruiser riders is that they like stopping with both feet down because they feel as though it is more secure and stable, but it really is not, for reasons that I previously mentioned. OK, it's after midnight here and I need to shut down. I appreciate any comments and feedback.

Zwartie

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Originally Posted by Mopheadama View Post
I am a tall guy so flat footing on the FJR isn't a problem for me. If you can't flat foot the FJR that is a problem. Like most folks here we have been on motorcycles for many years and when someone asks me what type of bike they should get my answer is always the same. If you can't get both feet flat on the ground when you straddle it, find something else that you can.
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post #15 of 110 (permalink) Old 10-26-2019, 12:35 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Mopheadama View Post
Looking at your signature I might guess the 1953 is year born? If so that makes us the same age and if you have the Mrs on the back (I don't) then that sort of makes the both feet on the ground thing even more important.

We don't bounce like we use to!
Definitely donít bounce like I use to!
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post #16 of 110 (permalink) Old 10-26-2019, 01:23 AM Thread Starter
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Mopheadama,

I have to respectfully disagree. I've been a licensed rider for 36 years and a Canada Safety Council motorcycle riding instructor for 18 years. We tell our students time and time again that it is a myth that one needs to be able to get both feet flat on the ground when you straddle the bike. At 5'8" and a 30" inseam there would be a whole lot of motorcycles off my list if I had to follow that rule. I have an '06 FJR with a Seth Laam seat and cannot touch flat footed when sitting on the bike - It's close, but not flat footed. I ride two-up with my wife regularly and that includes multi-day rides with the bike fully loaded (heavy). How do I do it, you ask? I stop in the Ready Position 90+ percent of the time. That means left foot down, right foot on the brake, clutch pulled in, and right hand on the throttle so I'm ready to go, just as the name suggests. We teach this method to our students as best practice and it really is that. I've seen too many students who like to stop with both feet down, then when they start to move off from a stop if for some reason they need to come to a quick stop before they get their feet up on the pegs they have all their weight on the seat and only one brake to do the stopping - the front brake. This is particularly hazardous when making a turn at an intersection if at the last second a pedestrian, E-bike, skateboarder, or whatever decides to step, jump, run, or ride out in front of you. Front brake only on a slow turn at an intersection is a recipe for disaster. The ready position also allows the rider to "scooch" their butt over so they can get their left foot flat on the ground supporting the bike. Yes, sometimes the rider may need to put their right foot down instead if there is a pot hole, or the road surface is uneven but again, most of the time they should be able to stop with their left foot down. What I find with many "experienced" riders and most often with cruiser riders is that they like stopping with both feet down because they feel as though it is more secure and stable, but it really is not, for reasons that I previously mentioned. OK, it's after midnight here and I need to shut down. I appreciate any comments and feedback.

Zwartie
I rode and raced dirt bikes for years, non of which I could flat foot. But things are difererent now at my advanced age and in addition I have a bad shoulder. This makes me more dependent on my legs, mainly when Iím riding two up. Itís the unpredictable times when you come to a stop on uneven pavement, debris in the road, or what have you that makes flat footing to me more important. Sometimes I donít have to put either foot down, but itís the unexpected times when I need both feet to prevent a tip over that makes me think I would be better off with a bike with a lower center of gravity and seat height. Hence my interest in the new Gold Wing.
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post #17 of 110 (permalink) Old 10-26-2019, 08:01 AM
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kej1953,

I get it, and my apologies for hijacking this thread. The Ready Position is still best practice when it comes to stopping in traffic and moving off from a stop, especially if you're just about to make a right turn at an intersection. If that doesn't work for you, just be sure to get your right foot up on the peg (or floor board) as soon as possible so it's available in case you need to brake. My response was in regards to the blanket statement (and I'm paraphrasing) that all riders need to be able to touch down with both feet flat on the ground when straddling the bike - that just isn't true. That being said, we also tell riders (especially new riders) to choose a bike that they are comfortable with in terms of weight, height, and handling. Obviously the FJR no longer fits the bill for you. My dad rode a GL1100 20 years ago and I've seen him go from that to a Shadow 750, then a Burgman 650 and now a 1977 KZ200 (in mint condition). He's 83 now and despite suffering from congestive heart failure and a few other ailments that require a half dozen pills per day to keep him going, he's still riding. A couple instructor buddies of mine who are in their mid-late 60's each recently switched from larger, heavier bikes (Concours 1400 and Super Tenere) to Yamaha FJ-09s. The FJ-09 (now known as the Tracer) is lighter and more nimble than their previous rides. One of them actually rides two-up fairly regularly on the FJ-09 and looks much more stable on it than he did on the Super Ten. I've taken his FJ-09 for a rip and that 3 cylinder engine is an absolute blast.

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Originally Posted by kej1953 View Post
I rode and raced dirt bikes for years, non of which I could flat foot. But things are different now at my advanced age and in addition I have a bad shoulder. This makes me more dependent on my legs, mainly when Iím riding two up. Itís the unpredictable times when you come to a stop on uneven pavement, debris in the road, or what have you that makes flat footing to me more important. Sometimes I donít have to put either foot down, but itís the unexpected times when I need both feet to prevent a tip over that makes me think I would be better off with a bike with a lower center of gravity and seat height. Hence my interest in the new Gold Wing.
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post #18 of 110 (permalink) Old 10-26-2019, 08:15 AM
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Originally Posted by zwartie View Post
Mopheadama,

I have to respectfully disagree. I've been a licensed rider for 36 years and a Canada Safety Council motorcycle riding instructor for 18 years. We tell our students time and time again that it is a myth that one needs to be able to get both feet flat on the ground when you straddle the bike. At 5'8" and a 30" inseam there would be a whole lot of motorcycles off my list if I had to follow that rule. I have an '06 FJR with a Seth Laam seat and cannot touch flat footed when sitting on the bike - It's close, but not flat footed. I ride two-up with my wife regularly and that includes multi-day rides with the bike fully loaded (heavy). How do I do it, you ask? I stop in the Ready Position 90+ percent of the time. That means left foot down, right foot on the brake, clutch pulled in, and right hand on the throttle so I'm ready to go, just as the name suggests. We teach this method to our students as best practice and it really is that. I've seen too many students who like to stop with both feet down, then when they start to move off from a stop if for some reason they need to come to a quick stop before they get their feet up on the pegs they have all their weight on the seat and only one brake to do the stopping - the front brake. This is particularly hazardous when making a turn at an intersection if at the last second a pedestrian, E-bike, skateboarder, or whatever decides to step, jump, run, or ride out in front of you. Front brake only on a slow turn at an intersection is a recipe for disaster. The ready position also allows the rider to "scooch" their butt over so they can get their left foot flat on the ground supporting the bike. Yes, sometimes the rider may need to put their right foot down instead if there is a pot hole, or the road surface is uneven but again, most of the time they should be able to stop with their left foot down. What I find with many "experienced" riders and most often with cruiser riders is that they like stopping with both feet down because they feel as though it is more secure and stable, but it really is not, for reasons that I previously mentioned. OK, it's after midnight here and I need to shut down. I appreciate any comments and feedback.

Zwartie


Well, I have to agree with Mopheadama, and disagree with you, but for different reasons.
Flat footing a bike with only ONE foot is dangerous, because if you're depending on that ONE foot (with the bike leaned that way) to stabilize you, you are in trouble if that foot slips on oil, gravel pebbles, etc. You lose your balance and the bike falls. Not good.


Plus, as we age, we get to the point where we can't always balance with only ONE foot/leg. We need two feet and legs to balance. I'll even go as far as saying that if you need help balancing an FJR1300, you're on the wrong bike...FOR YOU. An FJR is not a heavy bike. It's a lot lighter than a Honda ST1300, at 730 lbs. Top heavy or not, that's still about 100 lbs lighter than the ST1300, isn't it? It's been a while since I checked the FJR weight specs.
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post #19 of 110 (permalink) Old 10-26-2019, 10:47 AM
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Well, i’ll Through my .02 in here.... being a long time Wing guy (4 cyl versions) I will say the new wing in my opinion is physically about the same size as a fjr although about 200lbs heavier and the storage area appears to be less with a small top trunk. But the G-Wing even though it’s about 200lbs heavier has such a low Cg and very importantly like Mophead pointed out you can easily flat foot it which makes it easier to handle vs the tall and top heavy fjr.

I looked hard at the last gen Wing when the subframe had broken in my fjr because I really liked the 86 sei wing that I sold to buy the fjr, very similar in size and weight to the current Wing just not the performance. The really big downfall for me on the new wing is the cost and all the gadgetry is just more stuff to fail during ownership. Of course all of this is just my opinion, but I always keep the idea of owning a new(er) Wing in my mind.

And when the day comes that owning my fjr that I can no longer feel comfortable owning or riding its may just resort back to just riding one of my antiques.
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Ride more,, worry less !

Last edited by passx; 10-28-2019 at 09:10 AM.
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post #20 of 110 (permalink) Old 10-26-2019, 11:03 AM
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I sold my 2012 Wing about 2 years ago. I bought an FJR because i ride the mountains at least twice a year. At 77 years old it was a good choice for me. I consider it lighter and more maneuverable than the wing. Having said that the new wing is lighter and narrower,especially the six speed at 786 LBS. Either way they are both great bikes.
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