Possible new owner and saying hello - Yamaha FJR Forum : Yamaha FJR Owners Forums
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-22-2020, 10:34 AM Thread Starter
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Possible new owner and saying hello

Hello to the group,
I am not currently an FJR1300 owner. I ride a 2015 Triumph Rocket three touring that I bought new in 2016.
I am almost 61 years old, and have been riding most of my adult life. I have mainly ridden cruiser types such as my Rocket, as well as a 1700 Nomad, and two Valkyrieís.
I am considering downsizing from my Rocket to maybe the FJ. I have been having more of a hard time handling my bike as time goes on mainly at slow speeds due to the extreme weight.
I have had a couple of arm surgeries, and shoulder surgery some years back. So, with some aging going on, Iím not as strong as I used to be.
Moving to the Yamaha would trim about 200 pounds off of the bike weight that I have now.
I am also looking at the more upright and taller seating position that the FJ offers compared to my Triumph. With the feet forward casual position that I have now, there is a lot of weight on the tailbone area, and basically nothing on the legs. So of course, the back comes into play too.
So, I am asking here what anyone thinks about my concerns that I have now, and if switching to an FJ may be a better path forward for me. Between the weight difference, and seating position, I am thinking that this would be a good move.
I am not worried about the different performance qualities between the two bikes. I have a lot of experience, and Iím sure that I can adapt. My Rocket is a beast load of torque, and is quite a bike. Thanks for any responses, Eric
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-22-2020, 11:48 AM
red
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Eric,

Welcome! The FJR is indeed lighter, but the mass is located higher than may be expected. As long as the bike is vertical when the feet are down, no problem. There is a tipping point though, beyond which nobody on the bike can prevent a drop. Since fall bars and frame sliders will cost less than repairing things after a drop, I recommend the protection there. I also recommend half a tank of gas or less, when getting accustomed to the FJR at feet-down speeds. Half a tank of gas should be good for more than 100 miles of travelling range, so make it easier for yourself, there.

The predecessor of the FJR-1300 was the FJ-1200, so it can be confusing to refer to the FJR as the FJ. I have one of each.

The FJR seat is not that great. Most riders will change to a Yamaha FJR Comfort Seat (as a minimum), to a Russel Day Long (as a maximum) for seating comfort. Most used FJRs will have some brand of aftermarket seat, unless the owner is selling the custom seat separately. Other comforts available include foot peg positions, handlebars or risers, windscreens of various shapes and sizes, gas-tank knee-grip panels, foam handgrips, and highway pegs. You should be able to make the bike exactly yours, as far as the ergonomics. FJRs are ridden long and hard, so if any one part might bite you, there is probably a good remedy available on the market.

Here is a .PDF file showing what changed and when, for the FJR line. Download the .PDF file, and you can zoom in a lot. Pre-2008 FJRs came with some shortfalls, but for 2008 and younger, the FJR just gets better each year.
https://drive.google.com/file/d/16Cb...OxYTkEip8/view

Happy hunting!
.

Cheers,
Red
2008 FJR1300A
- Pirelli Angel GT (Spec A) tires, RDL seat, TPMS, GPS digital speedometer (Amazon ~US$28.00).
P.S. Life is too short, and health is too valuable, to ride on cheap parade-duty tires.
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-22-2020, 11:50 AM
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Howdy and welcome to the forum.

The FJR is a nice motorcyle particularly the later ones with cruise, 6 speed trans and slipper clutch (not for the slipper feature, but for the reduced pull). The bike is lighter than a Rocket 3, or Harley or Goldwing, but it's no lightweight at 650ish pounds. it's rather tall too if you are under say 5'10". The riding position is a bit sporty and a lot of owners go for bar risers, taller windshields and more comfortable seats. If you can, you should try and get a test ride, or at least a test sit. Bike has plenty of power, and looks good.

SW Ohio
2018 Yamaha FJR 1300A
2014 Honda CB1100 DLX

It doesn't matter what I ride, where I ride, how fast I ride, or how far I ride... it only matters THAT I RIDE...EVERY DAY. "Ferret"
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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-22-2020, 12:19 PM Thread Starter
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I would only be interested in new or leftover. I am six feet tall and weigh about 225. Reaching the ground should not be a problem. I think I would like the higher seating position with the fjr. As far as reaching a tipping point, my Rocket with the tall engine and a six gallon tank is unstoppable once you tip past a certain point. I know this from personal experience which I am not proud to say. I do believe that Yamaha being 200 pounds lighter has got to be somewhat easier to push around and park
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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-22-2020, 12:42 PM
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Eric, depends on the type of riding you want to do... FJ to me could be FJ-09, but better yet, the newer Tracer GT..... or look at the "lighter bike" thread. Outfitted with saddlebags, you can easily fit in with FJR's.
If you're having strength concerns in the legs/knees, then I'd say go lighter. I've done that, with the attitude of being able to enjoy a lighter bike much longer than a heavy one.
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Ray
Keep yer stick on the ice....
2014 FJR1300A - Root Beer (sold)
2009 CBF1000A - Sienna Red
1999 VFR800Fi - Pearl Shining Yellow
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-22-2020, 04:27 PM
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Eric, I had the much the same story as you back in 2017 when I bought my new 2016 FJR...I'll give you feedback on my experience:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric R. View Post
Hello to the group,
I have mainly ridden cruiser types such as my Rocket, as well as a 1700 Nomad, and two Valkyrieís.
I am considering downsizing from my Rocket to maybe the FJ. I have been having more of a hard time handling my bike as time goes on mainly at slow speeds due to the extreme weight.
I came from a long line of cruisers as well, but could not do the feet-forward position anymore due to a lower back that shot lightning up my spine each time I hit a bump, and, bumps or not, ached for hours after. I also wanted to trim a bit of weight off my ride. My last cruiser was a 2012 Triumph Thunderbird 1600.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric R. View Post
Moving to the Yamaha would trim about 200 pounds off of the bike weight that I have now.
The FJR trimmed about 50 pounds off the Thunderbird, but I have to say it felt like more...pretty surprising how even a slight reduction in true weight translates to felt savings.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric R. View Post
I am also looking at the more upright and taller seating position that the FJ offers compared to my Triumph. With the feet forward casual position that I have now, there is a lot of weight on the tailbone area, and basically nothing on the legs. So of course, the back comes into play too.
That was, as mentioned above, the primary reason for my moving to the FJR, and it certainly had the desired effect. That slight forward lean with your hips pivoted slightly forward and your legs beneath you in a standard position makes all the difference. You're on the right path to correct that issue.[/QUOTE]

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric R. View Post
So, I am asking here what anyone thinks about my concerns that I have now, and if switching to an FJ may be a better path forward for me. Between the weight difference, and seating position, I am thinking that this would be a good move.
I am not worried about the different performance qualities between the two bikes. I have a lot of experience, and Iím sure that I can adapt. My Rocket is a beast load of torque, and is quite a bike. Thanks for any responses, Eric
Here is my advice, coming from the same situation as you and having four years on my 2016 FJR *but* having just switched to another bike (a R1250R, a naked roadster w/ pannier option): IF your plan is to tour long-distance or otherwise focus on rides that incorporate a great deal of highway riding, the FJR cannot be beat. I found, however, that most of my riding was winding back country roads, carving corners on two-lane roads on sunny afternoon...for that, I ultimately found, after three years, that the top-heavy, 650(ish)-pound FJR is a bike that is significantly less suited for such riding as it takes -- for me -- far too much effort and input from the rider. Had I to do it over again and truly ensured that my bike choice matched my riding preference, I should have gone with the Tracer or similar...I would have received the same forward-lean benefit and the use of panniers, but the weight and handling would have been far more conducive to the type of riding I do 95% of the time.

The FJR is a great bike (though apparently it's being discontinued after this year, or so the rumor mill says) and I don't regret the saddle time I had on one, but do be aware that it's still a heavy bike and carries that weight high. If that suits the type of riding you do, then you'd be challenged to find a better bike for the money, but if weight savings is as much as a priority (as it seems to be, based on your OP) as slightly forward ergonomics/lean and handling, then I would suggest you may want to look at either the new Tracer GT or BMW F900XR, as both offer the touring/pannier capability, but are significantly lighter in weight and handling. Do note, though, that both are chain driven...don't know if the shaft drive of the FJR was a driver in your decision.

Good luck in your decision, and as someone mentioned above, you may want to give the Thinking of Going Lighter thread a read...some good info and thoughts in there: https://www.fjrowners.com/forums/15-...g-lighter.html

2016 FJR1300A
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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-22-2020, 05:43 PM
red
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Possible new owner and saying hello

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric R. View Post
I would only be interested in new or leftover. I am six feet tall and weigh about 225. Reaching the ground should not be a problem. I think I would like the higher seating position with the fjr.
Eric,

I find that the FJR is a very respectable machine, until the tach approaches ~ 5000; from there on, the FJR can blur the landscape if you wish. In the higher RPM ranges, "respect" is almost too tame a word for it. Amazing, maybe . . . The bike is "sneaky-fast." You can be tooling around in town thinking that you are going about 45 mph, but then a check of the speedometer may show 60+ . . . Just take things easy, at first. In town, the lower gears will be your friends. The higher gears will attract unwanted attention, in town.

On the open road, the FJR should steer almost by thought command. On your test rides, if you notice any tendency for the bike to "fall into" turns, the front tire simply needs a few more pounds of air pressure. If the bike wants to "stand up" in turns, the front tire has a few pounds too much air pressure. In the golden range between these limits, steering will be very neutral and effortless. Start at about 38 PSI Front/ 42 PSI Rear, and tinker a bit from there, if needed. Some tires are more demanding of maintaining the correct pressures than others, of course. For ANY bike, I now recommend a TPMS, before you add any other gadgets. Two new valve caps and a USB cable, and the TPMS installation is a done deal. Just be sure that you can read the TPMS display in full sunlight.

The FJR can be turbine-smooth, in full flight. If you notice any vibration in the hand-grips (or any numbness in the hands or wrists), the bike is in need of some gentle attention. A Throttle Body Synchronization (TBS) will help a lot, and other "fixes" such as fuel injector cleaner, foam hand-grips, better gloves, and bar end weights are good options as well. Some people say that any inline fours just vibrate as a fact of life, but I think they may have stopped short of the goal, sometimes.
.

Cheers,
Red
2008 FJR1300A
- Pirelli Angel GT (Spec A) tires, RDL seat, TPMS, GPS digital speedometer (Amazon ~US$28.00).
P.S. Life is too short, and health is too valuable, to ride on cheap parade-duty tires.
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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-22-2020, 07:48 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you guys for the responses. I went to the dealer this afternoon just to see the 20 fjr and sit on one for the first time. I must say it felt small to me. I am a pretty big guy like I said. The bars seemed very narrow and I had to reach for them.
So parked right next to this new fjr was a 2020 Kawasaki 1400 Concourse. This bike fit me better. It felt bigger overall. My wife also thought I looked better on it. It had more fairing, and I didnít reach as much for the bars, plus they were a little wider.
It had more bodywork too so I donít know if engine heat would be an issue.
I definitely have to think about things. The dealer wants me to stop in Saturday with my r3t and have a look at it. I told him I would but I may not. Iíll see.
Thanks again for taking the time to reply to my post.
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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 07-22-2020, 10:10 PM
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The Connie bad heat issues were fixed in 2010, no cruise control, less gas mileage than an FJR, valve check very involved. But, I'll let former Connie owners chime in.

Ray
Keep yer stick on the ice....
2014 FJR1300A - Root Beer (sold)
2009 CBF1000A - Sienna Red
1999 VFR800Fi - Pearl Shining Yellow
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