BMW Motorrad Says It's Made A Zero-Maintenance Chain - Page 2 - Yamaha FJR Forum : Yamaha FJR Owners Forums
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post #11 of 42 (permalink) Old 08-29-2020, 08:39 PM
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Once a year, remove the front sprocket cover and look for "spare" o-rings...... I think it best to give a little attention to preventing that if you can, but agree, not much maintenance needed... if you have a dirt bike, then there's less hope due to all the grit.

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post #12 of 42 (permalink) Old 08-29-2020, 08:46 PM
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I'm guessing you are a little harder on the acceleration from a dead stop, banging thru the gears, and down shifting quickly multiple times to take advantage of engine braking more than I do lol. All of those are tough on chains.

Today's chains really don't need much lubrication..mainly light lubing to keep the side plates from rusting, and very little adjustment over their life depending on how they are treated. Mine mainly get adjusted when putting on a new rear tire, so about 8-10,000 miles between adjustments. They really are light years ahead of the chains we had in the 60's. 70's 80's and 90's. They are excellent as far as chains go.

Thing is, a shaft system will go many many times as long as the longest lasting chain and sprockets on a few ounces of oil and some grease once in awhile.

Who here would buy a chain drive car? (BTW Honda used to make one)
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post #13 of 42 (permalink) Old 08-30-2020, 01:16 PM
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Probably end up spending all the money saved on chains on sprockets...

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post #14 of 42 (permalink) Old 08-30-2020, 04:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dubfjr View Post
Probably end up spending all the money saved on chains on sprockets...
If the chain doesn't wear, {stretch} then the sprockets should last pretty much forever as well.

07 FJR 48,000 miles 03 Yamaha FJR1300
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post #15 of 42 (permalink) Old 08-30-2020, 05:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the Ferret View Post
I'm guessing you are a little harder on the acceleration from a dead stop, banging thru the gears, and down shifting quickly multiple times to take advantage of engine braking more than I do lol. All of those are tough on chains.

Today's chains really don't need much lubrication..mainly light lubing to keep the side plates from rusting, and very little adjustment over their life depending on how they are treated. Mine mainly get adjusted when putting on a new rear tire, so about 8-10,000 miles between adjustments. They really are light years ahead of the chains we had in the 60's. 70's 80's and 90's. They are excellent as far as chains go.

Thing is, a shaft system will go many many times as long as the longest lasting chain and sprockets on a few ounces of oil and some grease once in awhile.

Who here would buy a chain drive car? (BTW Honda used to make one)
haha yeah, thatís me sometimes ...I tend to agree on your points, keeping the rings clean is the important bit. The real lubrication is on the inside.

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post #16 of 42 (permalink) Old 08-30-2020, 06:44 PM
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Chains have always been zero maintenance. No need to maintain, just replace!
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post #17 of 42 (permalink) Old 08-30-2020, 08:23 PM
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Hope it works better than there sealed for life drive units they came up with years ago, since discontinued.
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post #18 of 42 (permalink) Old 08-31-2020, 04:26 AM
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If the chain doesn't wear, {stretch} then the sprockets should last pretty much forever as well.
Would the harder chain not chew up the softer sprockets?

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post #19 of 42 (permalink) Old 08-31-2020, 04:45 AM
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It shouldn't in a perfect world Dub. Once this so called miraculous chain is installed and seated it should not effect the sprocket whatsoever.

But I know the world ain't perfect!! Lol, my last name is O'Brien and have always wanted to see/visit Ireland!! My Pops came here as a "wee little thing" lol.

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post #20 of 42 (permalink) Old 08-31-2020, 07:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Dubfjr View Post
Would the harder chain not chew up the softer sprockets?
I'm no expert, but the MAIN reason sprockets have to be replaced is that the chain "stretches" {the distance between the links increases as the chain wears, that's why you have to adjust the chain} As the chain links get further apart, instead of every roller contacting the sprocket at the base of each tooth and each carrying a small part of the load, when stretched, only one or two of the links contact one or two of the sprocket teeth at any given time, which makes for a lot of wear on the teeth AND even more accelerated wear on the chain. Then, because the links become so far apart they can't fit between the sprocket teeth, the chain rises up on the sprocket and is in contact with a higher, thinner, weaker part of the teeth and the teeth start being curved toward the direction of travel.

Almost ALL of this wear and deforming of the sprocket would not happen, if each link of the chain continued to sit down at the base of the teeth, and the power continued to be spread between ALL the teeth. At least that's what I think, my wife would disagree, LOL
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1986 Yamaha FZX700 1977 Kawasaki KX250 1978? Yamaha TY250 1979 Yamaha YZ250 1970 850 Moto Guzzi 1974? Honda XL 100 1978? Yamaha XT500 1975 Yamaha RD350B 1964 Bridgestone 90S

Last edited by philharmonic; 09-02-2020 at 07:02 AM.
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