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-   -   Which steering stem wrench is this? (https://www.fjrowners.com/forums/11-fjr-parts-servicing/139865-steering-stem-wrench.html)

Ditch 02-26-2018 01:40 PM

Which steering stem wrench is this?
 
1 Attachment(s)
This doesn't look like the factory one, can anyone tell me if the distance to the star is the same as their Yamaha one?

R!der 02-26-2018 03:07 PM

I don't think it matters, as long as you follow the procedure. The torque would be the same.

I made my own in the shape of a pin socket wrench. Literally, I used a piece of plumbing pipe the same OD as the nut and cut in the end, then welded a washer and socket to the other end so could connect my torque wrench. Worked great!

Ditch 02-26-2018 03:13 PM

My thoughts were that if the distance to the center is different, it would effect torque values because the leverage has changed.

R!der 02-26-2018 03:31 PM

At 90 degrees, to a point, there is no change in leverage. Using that offset tool, if you place your torque wrench parallel to extend the leverage, you increase torque; if you place the torque wrench parallel to the tool so that it overlaps over the nut, then you decrease effective torque. Somewhere in between (90 degrees), there is no change in torque.

The formula to calculate this is:

effective torque = torque spec / (1 + (B x COS ō)), where B is the length of that silly tool. The Cosine of 90 degrees is zero, so effective torque become equal to the torque spec.

doc 02-26-2018 03:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ditch (Post 1128353)
My thoughts were that if the distance to the center is different, it would effect torque values because the leverage has changed.


And you would be correct ;)


Sorry I can't help with your original question though.

R!der 02-26-2018 03:37 PM

Here is an online calculator to play with. Enter 90 degrees and any length of offset tool (up to half the length of your torque wrench):

http://www.cncexpo.com/TorqueAdapter.aspx

Bernie 02-26-2018 03:49 PM

Here is the proper tool to use, you will always get the correct torque. https://www.gbmotorcycleproducts.com...roduct_id=4508

R!der 02-26-2018 04:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bernie (Post 1128401)
Here is the proper tool to use, you will always get the correct torque. https://www.gbmotorcycleproducts.com...roduct_id=4508

I was too cheap for that. A resourceful chap could turn an old crusty socket into that with an angle grinder. You only need two opposing pins.

Someone once mentioned to me, Why build what you can buy?

I was even too cheap to buy a socket large enough. Bad enough I had to spring for a 36mm...

Ditch 02-26-2018 04:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bernie (Post 1128401)
Here is the proper tool to use, you will always get the correct torque. https://www.gbmotorcycleproducts.com...roduct_id=4508

The torque specs would be different than what Yamaha recommends because that's right over the nut and the tool I have is a couple of inches away, no?

Ditch 02-26-2018 04:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by R!der (Post 1128385)
Here is an online calculator to play with. Enter 90 degrees and any length of offset tool (up to half the length of your torque wrench):

http://www.cncexpo.com/TorqueAdapter.aspx

That's really cool but I still need the dimensions of the Yamaha one.


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