Lowering Links - Page 2 - Yamaha FJR Forum : Yamaha FJR Owners Forums
 33Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 28 (permalink) Old 03-07-2020, 08:55 AM
Senior Member
High-G FJR Junkie!
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Rolling Prairie, Ind
Posts: 2,844
Also as Ray mentioned if you remove the plastic tray thingy under the seat it will give you a little bit of drop, plus you can shave the rubber bumpers a little under the seat,just be aware that the back edge of the seat will probably rub on the side covers, to much pressure and it could break the side cover. I added a strip of the fuzzy side of Velcro to the top of the side cover to protect the paint and the seat cover.

Steve P
Red 2014A, the fastest color !
Ride more,, worry less !
passx is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 28 (permalink) Old 03-07-2020, 02:04 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
Trainee Sport Tourer
 
wes_van's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 28
Thanks again for the feedback everyone. I didn't mention that when I purchased this bike used it has a Rich's seat on it but didn't come with the original seat. I'm in the dark as to where this seat is in terms of height, I do know it is comfy as **** so my option for this would be to get Rich's to modify it. (Don't want to mess with a good thing) I may even look at buying a stock seat and give that a try.
passx likes this.

81 HD Superglide. 82 CB900F. 82 GS1100 Katana. 83 GS750ES. 82 GS750E. 82 GS1100E 89 ZX600 Ninja 83 GS1100 Drag Bike. 98 VTR1000. 02 ST1100 06 ST1300 06 HD Road King
wes_van is offline  
post #13 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-16-2020, 10:17 PM
Junior Member
Training wheels fitted!
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: Hayward, WI & Gold Canyon, AZ
Posts: 1
Just say NO! I bought a 2008 and it came with the Soupy's links. Center stand was worthless and it was always a guessing game as to whether or not the bike would fall away from the side stand. After a while, it wasn't a problem as the foot broke off the side stand. To balance out those issues, the handling was awful! I have since replaced the side stand, tires, and put the stock links back on. Before you think I am 6 foot 14, let me assure you that I am 5' 7' with a 30 inch inseam. Even with being vertically challenged, I don't find the stock height to be an issue. That said, I also have a 2019 KTM Super Duke GT with a 32.9" seat height, and I manage it. Not without challenges (like trying to back out of a parking spot with a slight uphill run), but I can live with it. By the way, the SD GT is more fun than a 73 year old man should be allowed to have.
bounce likes this.
Boostmeister is offline  
 
post #14 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-16-2020, 11:43 PM
Senior Member
Farkle Trainee
 
zwartie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: London, ON
Posts: 149
wes_van,

I'm with Boostmeister on this one. I'm 5'8" with a 30" inseam. My '06 FJR has a Seth Laam seat which sits a bit higher and wider than stock. I have no problem with the seat height because I always stop in the ready position - left foot down, right foot on the brake. I've been a Canada Safety Council (CSC) Motorcycle Riding Instructor for going on 19 years and we teach the ready position as the correct way to come to a stop on any motorcycle - sport bike, cruiser, adventure-tourer, it doesn't matter. Yes, there are times when I put my right foot down or even have both feet down momentarily but I would say that 95% of the time I stop in the ready position. That includes riding two-up with the bike fully loaded for a multi-day trip with my wife. The motorcycle licencing program in Ontario is graduated - we do a weekend parking lot course for new riders to graduate from an M1 (90-day learner's permit) to an M2 which is good for 5 years. After 18 months they can take a road course with us to graduate to a full M licence. Most riders wait until their 5 years has almost expired (human nature) and are in a panic to get it before they run out of time. I would say that well over half, maybe even two thirds of those students who took our initial parking lot course 5 years earlier somehow forgot about stopping in the ready position. They come to a stop, put both feet down and often don't even have the front brake applied when they're waiting at an intersection - not good. So, it's back to basics to remind them of why the ready position is best practice. I know, I'm going on about this but it's important - how you do what you do results in what you get. A lot of people seem to think that you have to be able to touch both feet flat on the ground to ride a motorcycle - that just ain't true. If I'm off base here and you need the bike lowered for other reasons, please let me know. Otherwise, save your money on the lowering kit and instead spend it on a rider training course or even an advanced rider training course. You're in Vancouver, yes? Look up Advanced Rider Training - https://advancedridertraining.com/. It's run by Ryan Austin, a retired police officer who's conducted police rider training throughout North America. I took a two-day parking lot course with him last summer and it was excellent.

Zwartie
bounce likes this.
zwartie is offline  
post #15 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-17-2020, 09:08 AM
Senior Member
High-G FJR Junkie!
 
bounce's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 3,485
MSF teaches that same "ready" position but don't give it a name.
zwartie likes this.

Ridden wet. Put up hard.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
bounce is offline  
post #16 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-17-2020, 09:19 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
Trainee Sport Tourer
 
wes_van's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by zwartie View Post
wes_van,

I'm with Boostmeister on this one. I'm 5'8" with a 30" inseam. My '06 FJR has a Seth Laam seat which sits a bit higher and wider than stock. I have no problem with the seat height because I always stop in the ready position - left foot down, right foot on the brake. I've been a Canada Safety Council (CSC) Motorcycle Riding Instructor for going on 19 years and we teach the ready position as the correct way to come to a stop on any motorcycle - sport bike, cruiser, adventure-tourer, it doesn't matter. Yes, there are times when I put my right foot down or even have both feet down momentarily but I would say that 95% of the time I stop in the ready position. That includes riding two-up with the bike fully loaded for a multi-day trip with my wife. The motorcycle licencing program in Ontario is graduated - we do a weekend parking lot course for new riders to graduate from an M1 (90-day learner's permit) to an M2 which is good for 5 years. After 18 months they can take a road course with us to graduate to a full M licence. Most riders wait until their 5 years has almost expired (human nature) and are in a panic to get it before they run out of time. I would say that well over half, maybe even two thirds of those students who took our initial parking lot course 5 years earlier somehow forgot about stopping in the ready position. They come to a stop, put both feet down and often don't even have the front brake applied when they're waiting at an intersection - not good. So, it's back to basics to remind them of why the ready position is best practice. I know, I'm going on about this but it's important - how you do what you do results in what you get. A lot of people seem to think that you have to be able to touch both feet flat on the ground to ride a motorcycle - that just ain't true. If I'm off base here and you need the bike lowered for other reasons, please let me know. Otherwise, save your money on the lowering kit and instead spend it on a rider training course or even an advanced rider training course. You're in Vancouver, yes? Look up Advanced Rider Training - https://advancedridertraining.com/. It's run by Ryan Austin, a retired police officer who's conducted police rider training throughout North America. I took a two-day parking lot course with him last summer and it was excellent.

Zwartie
Thanks for the input on this, I did take the plunge and installed the lowering links dropping the back end approximately 1/2". Combined with moving the forks almost the same amount it's made a huge difference. For myself and I suspect many others it's about a 'comfort zone' while stopped on the bike. Interesting thing about your reference to the ready position, this is how I always come to a stop but have never taken any formal rider training. As for an advanced rider course it is definitely something I've considered.
passx, the Ferret and zwartie like this.

81 HD Superglide. 82 CB900F. 82 GS1100 Katana. 83 GS750ES. 82 GS750E. 82 GS1100E 89 ZX600 Ninja 83 GS1100 Drag Bike. 98 VTR1000. 02 ST1100 06 ST1300 06 HD Road King
wes_van is offline  
post #17 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-17-2020, 09:51 AM
Senior Member
High-G FJR Junkie!
 
bounce's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 3,485
2 feet down as a "need" is a myth. Didn't you ride a 26" bike as a gradeschooler? How'd you reach both feet down then? How about dirt bikes?
zwartie likes this.

Ridden wet. Put up hard.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
bounce is offline  
post #18 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-17-2020, 10:19 AM
Senior Member
FJR Top Gun
 
the Ferret's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 1,186
I rode a 20" bike as a kid, and the dirt bikes I rode (and raced) in the early 70's had seat heights of 28-30".

Some of us need a little help reaching the ground and lowering links are a valid method. Commonly used on lots of models of motorcycles. At my 5 51/2" and a 26" inseam, the nearly 32 " seat height on a stock FJR is the same as a nearly 38" seat height for a guy with a 32" inseam. Think about that. How many guys would be searching for a way to lower it if the FJR had a 38" seat height? Or how about riding a dirt bike with a 45" seat height?

A combo of lower links, sliding the fork tubes, waffle stopper boots and maybe a little seat work makes a short person a lot more comfortable when coming to a stop. Sure you COULD hold up a 650 pound bike with one toe in most circumstances, as long as there is no dip in the road surface, no sand, or gravel, as long as you don't have to back up a little

We are not all 6' tall you know.

SW Ohio
2018 Yamaha FJR 1300A
2014 Honda CB1100 DLX

It doesn't matter what I ride, where I ride, how fast I ride, or how far I ride... it only matters THAT I RIDE...EVERY DAY. "Ferret"

Last edited by the Ferret; 04-17-2020 at 10:39 AM.
the Ferret is offline  
post #19 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-17-2020, 11:14 AM
Member
Trainee Sport Tourer
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Windsor ON
Posts: 60
I have Soupy links and adjustable sidestand on my 2015. I use a 2x4 to get it on the centerstand, and have a short 2x4 under the seat for away from home use. Fits perfectly in the tray, works for me. I did get it on the centerstand once when I first had it lowered, but could not duplicate that feat again, thus the 2x4. 5'5", 29 inseam.

2015 FJR1300A
2003 Hayabusa
Joey is offline  
post #20 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-19-2020, 08:56 AM
Senior Member
High-G FJR Junkie!
 
bounce's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 3,485
Quote:
Originally Posted by the Ferret View Post
Some of us need a little help reaching the ground and lowering links are a valid method. Commonly used on lots of models of motorcycles. At my 5 51/2" and a 26" inseam, the nearly 32 " seat height on a stock FJR is the same as a nearly 38" seat height for a guy with a 32" inseam. Think about that. How many guys would be searching for a way to lower it if the FJR had a 38" seat height? Or how about riding a dirt bike with a 45" seat height?

I would take all of the above as the bike wasn't for me and that another would fit better. [Not 6' here either. 5' 10" with a 30" (or less) inseam.]

Ridden wet. Put up hard.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
bounce is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Yamaha FJR Forum : Yamaha FJR Owners Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome