Fuse Blocks? Which one? - Yamaha FJR Forum : Yamaha FJR Owners Forums
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post #1 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-06-2019, 11:26 AM Thread Starter
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Fuse Blocks? Which one?

I am adding a Givi V47 top box with the E132 remote control which requires "always on" power. I also have a GPS and likely will be looking at lighting options for the Givi V47 in the future (admore, givi basic lights, etc).

The previous owner wired the GPS using a relay so it is powered on and off with the key. I can wire the E132 directly to the battery and be done. But I thought if I am going down this road of adding this and potentially other devices in the future I should be looking for a fuse block.

After lots of research I was pretty much settled on the Fuzeblock FZ1 at $119 CAD + shipping + wiring (whether using their harness or self wired).

I considered the Denali ($175 CAD) and Innovv options and the PDM60 (just too expensive, although cool as heck).

However, this morning I found this one:

Show Chrome Electronic Fuse Block - 13-311

The price is about $30 CAD cheaper than the FuzeBlock, available with free shipping and comes with the wiring harness. It is limited to 2 x 12v always on and 3 x switched connections. The Fuzeblock has 6 which can be either. It also has wiring for lights (interesting, but not sure how useful it would be).

I am really interested in any opinions on this Show Chrome one or any of the others.

Current bike: 2015 FJR1300A
Previous bike: 2014 NC750x

Last edited by lue42; 12-06-2019 at 11:29 AM.
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post #2 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-06-2019, 01:32 PM
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I actually put one of the ShowChrome ones on my CBF this summer... a little bulky with all of it's inputs, but very functional for those adding auxiliary lighting (the CBF's rear end wiring not all that convenient to access). The Fuzeblock is the smallest, maybe next smallest is the Eastern Beaver PC-8.

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post #3 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-06-2019, 02:43 PM
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Highly recommend the Eastern Beaver stuff ... They also have a wiring harness specifically made for FJR ...


I have had many years of reliable service from my set up .... Priced right and very well engineered ...

My 2 cents ...

Workin' them angels overtime ...
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post #4 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-06-2019, 08:57 PM
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With the Givi remote control, you definitely want an unswitched "always on" connection to the battery.

My Givi V56 trunk runs an LED brake light setup. While you're wiring, might want that visibility with those high up lights.

Also want to make sure you switch any accessories that remain on the motorbike when you park. Apparently there are bikers that will charge their phones off of your USB on your bike when you take lunch. So my on-bike accessible accessories only run with the key in the ignition.

Here is my fuse block analysis: FuzeBlock, Show Chrome or Eastern Beaver?

Show Chrome - so few comments about it - I threw that option away.

FuzeBlock is run by the wife of the dead founder. No more development. Now it's just a business. Lots of money for a fuse block with an integrated relay - $89. With the Fuzeblock, if the relay fails, you're stuck unless it bypasses to open circuit. Tried to see if I could buy a back-up 30A relay and as far as I can tell, it's soldered onto their PCB board. No go then.

Eastern Beaver provides 2 more circuits than the FuzeBlock. So 8 circuits and they make an FJR1300 specific wiring harness. Very tempting unless you consider that they make their fuse blocks and harnesses in China yet don't pass the savings onto you. You are paying for the engineering and the R&D development which was recouped years ago. Now it's just an order to a Chinese factory and you still pay $130?

My decision?

Installed l my own fuse block from Amazon - but with 10-circuits for careful compliant expansion.

I bought $16 10-circuit fuse block with an integrated ground bus, 10' of fiberglass heat shield to protect wiring under gas tank, $10 in ring/clip connectors and a $16 Bosch relay and some 12 and 16 gauge wires . . . and saved some money.

If the relay blows, I can easily unplug and swap in a new one. Connection fails, I can troubleshoot. Back on the road. Need to add another circuit? I've got 10 circuits compared to their 6/8.

With this type of fuse block, if I blow a fuse, a red LED light will illuminate showing me which circuit I have to check and fix. Those others don't have that simple feature.

Still need basic crimping and soldering skills. Basic wiring diagram attached below. 12 gauge wires from battery terminals to the fuse block, set up a relay. Wires positive and negative to your devices from the block.

That's what I did for about $85 including the wiring harness and fuses. Freed up space on my battery terminals for the few "always on" connections (battery changer SAE port, Hella horns).

My heated grips, heated riding gear coaxial plug and dual USB charger for phones are all on a switched/relay block. When I add some Denali driving lights, I'll wire them into the fuse block too.

Reality is that you may save an hour on the install going with a commercially produced fuse block compared to working up your own. But you will still be taking off a few battery and side panels, tilting the gas tank, removing the passenger seat, running wires, setting up a relay and doing a decent amount of soldering/crimping.

The result for me was a neater and safer electrical system compared to my prior rat's nest on my battery terminals and you safely take off load from our thin Yamaha factory wiring harnesses .

Worth it!
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2003 Honda Gold Wing GL1800A (Current), 2005 Yamaha FJR1300A (Former), 1985 Kawasaki GPZ900R Ninja (Former)
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Last edited by jtdunc; 12-07-2019 at 01:31 AM.
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post #5 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-07-2019, 12:48 AM
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At the time I bought my FuzeBlok (about 4 years ago), the only other solutions were the Eastern Beavers and that really expensive electronic one. The FZ-1 seemed to give me a little more flexibility than the EB.


Been really happy with it. And because I restore vintage electronics (amplifiers, radios, and test equipment), replacing a soldered in relay will not be a problem. In fact, I will offer my services for relay replacement if needed.

Time spent looking at motorcycles, even Harleys, is never wasted.

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post #6 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-07-2019, 08:40 AM
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I've installed 5-6 FuzeBlocks over the past 10 years or so. Never had an issue with the relay on one. The internal relay and option to make any circuit switched or unswitched just make it so dang convenient to use and easy to install. Has anyone experienced or heard of a relay failure on a FuzeBlock?

I do not recall the Centech AP-1 Fuse Panel being mentioned. It used to be pretty popular on bikes. Advantage is that the fuses can be accessed without using tools. No relay tho. https://www.centechwire.com/Auxiliar...Panel-AP-1.htm

But the cat's pajamas for adding electrical components to a bike is the Hex ezCAN made for BMWs. Simple plug and play and allows the use of original swithches to control add ons. For instance, you can program auxiliary lites to flash when the horn is beeped, to flash to pass inconjunction with the high beam, to be activated with the emergency flashers and alternate with the bikes turn signals, to be one brightness during the day and the another brightness at nite, to be one brightnes on high beam and another brightnes on low, when making a turn the lite on the side of an activated turn signal will go off so as not to mask the front turn signal. Pretty slick.

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post #7 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-07-2019, 10:17 AM
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DIY is always an option.

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post #8 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-07-2019, 10:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtdunc View Post
With the Givi remote control, you definitely want an unswitched "always on" connection to the battery.

My Givi V56 trunk runs an LED brake light setup. While you're wiring, might want that visibility with those high up lights.

Also want to make sure you switch any accessories that remain on the motorbike when you park. Apparently there are bikers that will charge their phones off of your USB on your bike when you take lunch. So my on-bike accessible accessories only run with the key in the ignition.

Here is my fuse block analysis: FuzeBlock, Show Chrome or Eastern Beaver?

Show Chrome - so few comments about it - I threw that option away.

FuzeBlock is run by the wife of the dead founder. No more development. Now it's just a business. Lots of money for a fuse block with an integrated relay - $89. With the Fuzeblock, if the relay fails, you're stuck unless it bypasses to open circuit. Tried to see if I could buy a back-up 30A relay and as far as I can tell, it's soldered onto their PCB board. No go then.

Eastern Beaver provides 2 more circuits than the FuzeBlock. So 8 circuits and they make an FJR1300 specific wiring harness. Very tempting unless you consider that they make their fuse blocks and harnesses in China yet don't pass the savings onto you. You are paying for the engineering and the R&D development which was recouped years ago. Now it's just an order to a Chinese factory and you still pay $130?

My decision?

Installed l my own fuse block from Amazon - but with 10-circuits for careful compliant expansion.

I bought $16 10-circuit fuse block with an integrated ground bus, 10' of fiberglass heat shield to protect wiring under gas tank, $10 in ring/clip connectors and a $16 Bosch relay and some 12 and 16 gauge wires . . . and saved some money.

If the relay blows, I can easily unplug and swap in a new one. Connection fails, I can troubleshoot. Back on the road. Need to add another circuit? I've got 10 circuits compared to their 6/8.

With this type of fuse block, if I blow a fuse, a red LED light will illuminate showing me which circuit I have to check and fix. Those others don't have that simple feature.

Still need basic crimping and soldering skills. Basic wiring diagram attached below. 12 gauge wires from battery terminals to the fuse block, set up a relay. Wires positive and negative to your devices from the block.

That's what I did for about $85 including the wiring harness and fuses. Freed up space on my battery terminals for the few "always on" connections (battery changer SAE port, Hella horns).

My heated grips, heated riding gear coaxial plug and dual USB charger for phones are all on a switched/relay block. When I add some Denali driving lights, I'll wire them into the fuse block too.

Reality is that you may save an hour on the install going with a commercially produced fuse block compared to working up your own. But you will still be taking off a few battery and side panels, tilting the gas tank, removing the passenger seat, running wires, setting up a relay and doing a decent amount of soldering/crimping.

The result for me was a neater and safer electrical system compared to my prior rat's nest on my battery terminals and you safely take off load from our thin Yamaha factory wiring harnesses .

Worth it!
I've always used commercially available fuse blocks and relays. McMaster Carr, Grainger, Amazon, local auto parts store, doesn't really matter. I could never understand the need for "motorcycle" fuse block/relays. I mounted mine under the seat. Easy to access if needed.
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post #9 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-07-2019, 10:37 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pterodactyl View Post
Has anyone experienced or heard of a relay failure on a FuzeBlock?
That is what I was wondering... there is a lot of mention of the relays, but I haven't read in any reviews anywhere of any relays needing to be replaced.

Thank you everyone for your responses!

For better or worse, at risk of making the broken relay option even more risky, I think I will go with the Show Chrome one that has even more relays than the FZ1 mostly for cost and availability (my wife wants an easy and quick to order gift idea for Christmas - and it is on Amazon). The separate relays "for complete isolation" for the lights is interesting - I would love to get a trailer in the future so this would be useful for that. Right now, I think the 3+2 connections are good enough as I only have 1x switched and 1x hot connections so far.

And, what's the worse that can happen - it fails and I replace it with a different model - I don't think there is any risk to the bike, just the hassle and extra cost down the road. Of the things that I would be connecting - GPS, Givi remote, lights... none of them would strand me the side of the road if they stopped working.

Again, thanks for the discussion.

Current bike: 2015 FJR1300A
Previous bike: 2014 NC750x
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post #10 of 20 (permalink) Old 12-07-2019, 02:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lue42 View Post
For better or worse, at risk of making the broken relay option even more risky, I think I will go with the Show Chrome one that has even more relays than the FZ1 mostly for cost and availability (my wife wants an easy and quick to order gift idea for Christmas - and it is on Amazon).

Again, thanks for the discussion.
@lue42 and fellow posters, really enjoyed this thread!

Sometimes we're "so serious" [Joker reference] on these matters that we forget the fun in all of it. For years, I've enjoyed teaching my Boy Scouts how to solder and do simple wiring.

Here in the U.S., Radio Shack closed because too many people do not get into electronics, ham radios or even soldering and wiring. Couldn't even find employees that knew anything about relays or LEDs. Can't even buy soldering tips from the retail stories around Seattle.

Wire on!
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ATGATT - My Safety Gear Has Saved Me Twice!
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Last edited by jtdunc; 12-07-2019 at 02:25 PM.
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